Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Seneca County New York Biographies

In the 1980’s a series of newsletters were published four times a year by Seneca County NY featuring historical information concerning Seneca county and her past residents. The current historian for Seneca County placed these online using PDF files. One of the main features of each edition were biographical sketches of early settlers of Seneca County. Unfortunately, while they provided an index inside of a spreadsheet for the 189 biographies, it is difficult for the average user to quickly get around. I’ve taken their spreadsheet and linked each edition to the PDF file. Once you’ve found the biography you want, click on the newsletter edition and then browse the pages until you find the specific biography you were looking for. This should help you find these wonderful biographies a little easier. SurnameGivenNewsletter Edition AckleyBenjaminSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleyJacobSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 4 AckleySamuel J.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 3 AlexanderWilliam H.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 2 AllenSilasSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 AlmySamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 4 No. 1 ArmstrongJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 3 No. 1 BachmanJosephSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 1 BaileyEbenezerSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 4 BaileyGeorge & SamuelSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeJohnSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeMahlonSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgePeterSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BainbridgeSeneca County History newsletter Vol. 1, No. 2 BaldwinJonas C.Seneca County History newsletter Vol. 2, No. 2 BangsAbnerSeneca County History...

Narrative of Robert Eastburn – Indian Captivities

A Faithful Narrative of the Many Dangers and Sufferings, as well as wonderful and surprising deliverances, of Robert Eastburn, during his late captivity among the Indians. Written by Himself. Published at the earnest request of many persons, for the benefit of the Public. With a recommendatory Preface by the Rev. Gilbert Tennent. Psalms 24, 6, 7, and 193, 2, 4. Philadelphia: Printed. Boston: Reprinted and sold by Green & Russell, opposite the Probate Office in Queen street, 1753. Preface Candid Reader: The author (and subject) of the ensuing narrative (who is a deacon of our church, and has been so for many years) is of such an established good character, that he needs no recommendation of others where he is known; a proof of which was the general joy of the inhabitants of this city, occasioned by his return from a miserable captivity; together with the readiness of divers persons to contribute to the relief of himself and necessitous family, without any request of his, or the least motion of that tendency. But seeing the following sheets are like to spread into many places where he is not known, permit me to say that, upon long acquaintance, I have found him to be a person of candor, integrity, and sincere piety, whose testimony may with safety be depended upon; which give his narrative the greater weight, and may induce to read it with the greater pleasure. The design of it is evidently pious; the matters contained in it and manner of handling them, will, I hope, be esteemed by the impartial to be entertaining and improving. I wish it...

Slave Narrative of Edd Shirley

Interviewer: Lenneth Jones Person Interviewed: Edd Shirley Location: Kentucky Age: 97 Occupation:  Janitor Monroe County. Folklore. (Lenneth Jones-242) [HW: Essay] Uncle Edd Shirley (97): Janitor at Tompkinsville Drug Co. and Hospital, Tompkinsville, Ky. [TR: Information moved from bottom of page.] Slaves: I am 97 years old and am still working as janitor and support my family. My father was a white man and my mother was a colored lady. I was owned three different times, or rather was sold to three different families. I was first owned by the Waldens; then I was sold to a man by the name of Jackson, of Glasgow, Kentucky. Then my father, of this county, bought me. I have had many slave experiences. Some slaves were treated good, and some were treated awful bad by the white people; but most of them were treated good if they would do what their master told them to do. I onced saw a light colored gal tied to the rafters of a barn, and her master whipped her until blood ran down her back and made a large pool on the ground. And I have seen negro men tied to stakes drove in the ground and whipped because they would not mind their master; but most white folks were better to their slaves and treated them better than they are now. After their work in the fields was finished on Saturday, they would have parties and have a good time. Some old negro man would play the banjo while the young darkies would dance and sing. The white folks would set around and watch; and would sometimes...

Biographical Sketch of John Shirley

John Shirley, a soldier of the Revolution, was born on board ship coming from England, and was brought up in Boston. He came to Fitzwilliam about 1780, settling in the village, and married Submit Bogle, of Sudbury, Mass. He reared a family of nine children, and died at the age of ninety-three, in the house where his grandson, William H., now lives. His son, Henry, was born in the town, held the office of selectman several years, and died at the same place his father did, at the age of seventy-two. William H., son of Henry, was born in the house where he now lives, on road 46, and is first selectman of the...

Shirley, Orville Dee – Obituary

Orville Dee Shirley, 79, of La Grande, died June 2, 2006, at St. Elizabeth Health Services. Cremation will take place at Eastern Oregon Pioneer Crematory in Baker City. Burial of the cremated remains will be later at the Enterprise Cemetery. Orville as born on Oct. 21, 1926, at Wallowa to Chet and Lady Clair Mabor Shirley. He lived at Enterprise until age 15 when the family moved to the Willamette Valley. He worked in the Oregon shipyards during the war. He later made his career in the timber industry as a log truck driver and millwright. He took a position with Boise Cascade in La Grande where he worked until his retirement. Orville enjoyed hunting and fishing. He also liked working with automobiles, of which he had several. Survivors include his sons, Dee Allan Shirley and George Lee Shirley, both of La Grande. Gray’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Used with permission from: Baker City Herald, Baker City, Oregon, June 9, 2006 Transcribed by: Belva...

Shirley, Orville Dee – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Orville Dee Shirley, 79, of La Grande died June 2 at St. Elizabeth Health Services in Baker City. Burial will be at the Enterprise Cemetery. Gary’s West & Co. Pioneer Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Mr. Shirley was born Oct. 21, 1926, to Chet and Lady Clair Mabor Shirley in Wallowa. The family lived in Enterprise before moving to the Willamette Valley. He worked in the shipyards during World War II and later worked in the timber industry as a log-truck driver and millwright. He worked for Boise Cascade in La Grande until his retirement. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and working on automobiles. Survivors include sons, Dee Allan Shirley and George Lee Shirley, both of La Grande. The Observer Online, Obituaries for the week ending June 10, 2006, Published June 8,...

Shirley, Michael L. – Obituary

Union, Oregon Michel L. Shirley, 60, of Milton-Freewater and formerly of Union died Aug. 13 at St. Mary Medical Center in Walla Walla. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Mr. Shirley was born Nov. 5, 1945, to Ancle L. and Eva M. Fulp Shirley in Tranquillity, Calif. He graduated from Union High School in 1963, and served in the Air Force specializing in computer systems. In 1966 he was assigned to NORAD Headquarters in Cheyenne Mountain, Colorado Springs, Colo., where he received the Armed Forces Commendation Medal. He graduated from the USAAFSS NCO Academy, and finished his military career as the computer operations supervisor at Yakima Research Station. On July 24, 1965, he married Kaylene Fletcher in Enterprise. The family spent several years in Wallowa County where he started a new career in facilities support. He was housekeeping supervisor and facilities manager at Wallowa Memorial Hospital, and from 1980 to 1986 he worked at St. Mary Medical Center as director of plant operations and maintenance. He worked in hospitality management and retired because of his health in 1989 from Walla Walla Community College as director of plant facilities. He enjoyed fishing, gardening, artistic endeavors and church activities. He was a member of the New Life Assembly of God Church, EMT, the American Society for Hospital Engineering, and was formerly a member of BPOE Lodge 1829. Survivors include his wife of Milton-Freewater; daughters Sharim Shirley of Lynnwood, Wash., Sandaleigh Shirley of Caldwell, Idaho, and Heather Shirley of Moss Beach, Calif.; two brothers Gaston Shirley and Atherd Shirley; seven sisters, Louvilla Sievers, Marline Hendrix, Jessie LaFontaine, Montaze...

Biography of John Shirley

John Shirley, one of Santa Ana’s most respected citizens, is a native of Hancock County, Ohio, born in 1835, and his parents were Daniel and Annie (Crow) Shirley, natives of Virginia. His father, a farmer and blacksmith, moved to Jackson County, Iowa, in 1850, and died there in 1872. When a lad the subject of this sketch drove an ox team across the plains to this State, and for the first several years here he followed mining at Placerville and other places till 1864, when he came with the soldiers to Southern California and Arizona. He enlisted in Company K, Seventh Regiment, California Volunteer Infantry, and served two years. He returned to Iowa and went to Clay County, Nebraska, where he erected the first good grain elevator in the county, and speculated in land and grain for a period of seventeen years. Having been very successful, and desiring a more congenial climate, he sold out his interests in Nebraska, in October, 1887, and came to the Golden State, selecting Santa Ana as his home. He bought a lot on Ross and Orchard streets, where he erected a neat and commodious residence. He has held some important offices, among which are those of justice of the peace in Clay County, Nebraska, for twelve years; chairman of the council four terms; associate judge with Judge Keyser, 1861-’62. As an evidence of his popularity, it may be stated that he was nominated for County Judge of Clay County, Nebraska, in 1887, even though he was at the time in California. He has traveled a great deal, crossing this continent eight times. Since...

Pin It on Pinterest