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Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Adams, Absalom Adams, James M. Allums, Britton Amoss, James Barnes, William Bays, John R. Bays, Moses Bays, Nathaniel Boman, Isham Boman, Larkin Boman, Levi Boman, Robert Boman, William Brooks, Isaac R. Brooks, John Brooks, William Burson, Isaac C. Butler, Whitaker Cardwell, William Collum, James Crawley, Bird Crawley, Turner Culberson, David H. Culberson, James H. Culberson, Jeremiah C. Curry, James Daniel, James L. Daniel, William B. Day, Stephen Dennis, Peter Dickson, Thomas Dunn, Barney Ethredge, Bryant Ethridge, Zachariah Funderburk, Washington Furgison, Burrell Gibson, Churchill Gibson, William Glenn, James Gresham, Davis E. Grizzle, Kinchen Guyse, Joel Harbuck, Henry, Sr. Harbuck, Henry, Jr. Harbuck, William Hendon, Henry T. Hicks, Jacob Hicks, Littleberry Hicks, Nathaniel Holmes, Benjamin Holt, William Hopson, William Horton, Jeremiah Jackson, Thomas Jenkins, John Jenkins, Robert Jennings, Robert M. Johnson, Lewis Johnson, Mordecai Jones, Willie Keeth, James M. Kilgore, Robert Kilgore, William Kirkland, John Kolb, Jonathan Latimer, Samuel M. Layton, Thomas S. Lewis, Henry. Lipham, John McCullars, Andrew McPost, Lindsey Mays, James Mays, Robert Meadows, Simeon Meadows, Vincent Miller, John C. Mobley, William Moran, Jesse Moran, William J. Morgan, Wilson Norman, Jeremiah Pace, Noel Patterson, James Patterson, John, Jr. Patterson, Thomas Patterson, William Peppin, Noah Phipps, Thomas Poe, Gilbert Poe, Jonathan Poe, Solomon Post, John B. Post, Samuel B. Powers, James G. Redding, John Reeves, James Rigsby, Allen Rigsby, Eli Rigsby, Noah Rigsby, William, Sr. Rigsby, William, Jr. Rockmore, James M. Roe, David Salmons, John B. Sanders, Jordan Scogins, Gillam Scogins, Gresham Scogins, John W. Shipp, Richard Shipp, Ransom Shoemaker, Jeremiah Shorter, James Stamps, Eason Stanford, Joshua T. Stewart, James E....

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

William Lewis Genealogy

Professor K. O. Thompson, author of the Lewis Family Genealogy descended the family tree through the line of Nathaniel Lewis, son of William Lewis and Mary Cheevers, for nine total generations in this free manuscript. If you descend from Nathaniel Lewis or William Lewis then this rare manuscript could be quite valuable to you.

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Biographical Sketch of Edward Payson Roe

Edward Payson Roe was one of Orange County’s most distinguished writers. He was born in Moodna, Orange County, N. Y., in 1838, and died at his home near Cornwall-on-Hudson in 1888. He is best remembered as a novelist whose works achieved great popularity in America and abroad, several of his novels being translated into foreign languages. He studied for the ministry, but illness caused him to abandon his studies while attending Williams College before graduation, but he afterward received a Bachelor’s degree, studied at Auburn and Union Seminaries, and in 1862-65, was a chaplain in the volunteer service during the Civil War between the states. He was from then until 1874 pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Highland Falls, N. Y., after which he gave himself up to lecturing, writing and fruit culture. His first novel, “Barriers Burned Away,” (1872,) was a story suggested by the great Chicago fire. This was followed by “Play and Profit in My Garden,” (1873.) These two works established his reputation as a writer, and were followed in rapid succession by “What Can She Do,” (1873,) `Opening a Chestnut Burr,” (1874,) “From Jest to Earnest,” (1875,) “Near to Nature’s Heart,” (1876,) “A Knight of the Nineteenth Century,” (1877,) “A Face Illuminated,” (1878,) “A Day of Fate,” (1880,) “A Young Girl’s Wooing,” (1884,) “An Original Belle,” (1885,) “Driven Back to Eden,” (1885,) “He Fell in Love With His Wife,” (1886,) “The Earth Trembled,” (1887.) He also wrote “Success With Small Fruits,” (1880,) and “Nature’s Serial Story,”...

Biography of James H. Roe

James H. Roe, a member of the firm of Holmes, Roe & Pierson, the publishers of the Riverside Daily Press and Weekly Horticulturist, is classed among the pioneers of Riverside, and for the sixteen years preceding this writing has been prominently connected with the interests and industries of the colony. The brief facts gathered relating to his life are of interest: He was born in Birmingham, England, in 1843, his parents being the Rev. Charles Hill, a native of the north of Ireland, and Mary (Steadman) Roe, a native of England. His father emigrated with his family to the United States in 1851, and located in Boone County, Illinois, where he was engaged in his ministerial duties until the breaking out of the civil war, when he entered the United States service as a chaplain, and later was the superintendent of the Freedmen’s Aid Commission, having jurisdiction of the affairs of that association in the southwest. He was a sincere Christian, a philanthropist and able orator, and visited England delivering lectures, and obtaining aid for the suffering freedmen of the South. Mr. Roe was reared and schooled in Boone County until 1859, when he entered the University of Chicago and was diligently pursuing his course of study in that institution when the breaking out of the war induced him to abandon his college studies and tender his aid. In 1862 he accompanied his father, who was chaplain of the fifty-sixth Regiment Illinois Infantry, to the field, and participated in the campaign of the Shenandoah Valley under General Banks, and later was at the siege and surrender of Harper’s Ferry....

Ponca Tribe

Ponca Indians. One of the five tribes of the so-called Dhegiha group of the Siouan family, forming with the Omaha, Osage, and Kansa, the upper Dhegiha or Omaha division. The Ponca and Omaha have the same language, differing only in some dialectic forms and approximating the Quapaw rather than the Kansa and Osage languages. The early history of the tribe is the same as that of the other tribes of the group, and, after the first separation, is identical with that, of the Omaha. After the migration of the combined body to the mouth of Osage river the first division of the Omaha group took place, the Osage settling on that stream, and the Kansa continuing up Missouri river, while the Omaha and Ponca crossed to the north side. The course of the latter is given from the tradition recorded by J. O. Dorsey1 as follows: The Omaha and Ponca, after crossing the Missouri, ascended a tributary of that river, which may have been Chariton River, and finally reached the pipestone quarry in south west Minnesota. All the traditions agree in stating that the people built earth lodges or permanent villages, cultivated the soil, and hunted buffalo and other animals. When game became scarce they abandoned their villages and moved north west. On reaching a place where game was plentiful, other villages were built and occupied for years. Thus they lived and moved until they reached the pipestone quarry. After reaching Big Sioux river they built a fort. The Dakota made war on the Omaha and their allies, defeating them and compelling them to flee south west until they reached Lake Andes, South Dakota. There, according to Omaha and...

Biographical Sketch of Jonas L. Roe

JONAS L. ROE.- Mr. Roe was born at Huntington, Pennsylvania, January 10, 1852, and is the son of James Roe, a farmer and carpenter, and a captain in the state militia. In 1854 our subject removed with his parents to Iowa, and subsequently shared with them the returns of hard labor and sagacious investments. Being a bright boy, dividing his time between following the plow and attending school, and growing up a vigorous youth, he took a thorough course of study at the Kirksville, Missouri, State Normal school, and at the age of twenty-one began independent life as teacher in Iowa. Crossing the plains to Oregon in 1880, he continued in the same public-spirited profession, and in 1883 anchored himself to the permanent interests of the country by purchasing a choice tract of land in the section known as the Sand Ridge, near Union, Oregon, a region justly celebrated for the production of wheat. There he has devoted himself exclusively to farming, having made a financial success of the undertaking, and has thereby provided his family a delightful home. He was married to Miss Lucy C. Cochran in 1875, and has a son and two daughters. Having ably filled local offices, he was in 1888 elected by the people of Union county to care for their political interests in the state legislature. In that capacity he has made an honorable record, and has extended his influence to adjoining counties. In 1889 he received an appointment as special agent of the general land-office, having been a great admirer and warm supporter of President Harrison in the late campaign. His canvass...

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