Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Leroy Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Albertsen, Albert. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 274.63 ac., sec. 1. (16.) Owner, Edwin F. Johnson. Anderson, A. R. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 360 ac., sec. 25. (33.) Anderson, Chris. Wf. Christina; ch. Christina, Lauritz, Amelia, Iler, Alfred, Samuel and Clarence. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 80 ac., sec. 26. (8.) Anderson, Jens C. Wf. Marie; ch. A. H. C., Carrie, Dagmar, Samuel, Dorcas and Theodora. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. O. 240 ac., sec. 19, and in Sharon Twp., O. 80 ac. (40.) Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Anderson, L. J. Wf. Mary; ch. Edwin, Esther, Elvia, Edna and Raymond. P. O. Audubon, R. 6. O. 323.04 ac., sec. 7. (38.) Andreasen, A. M. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. R. 154 ac., sec. 17. (32.) Owner, Jens Andreasen. Andreasen, Marius. Wf. Dagna. P. O. Audubon, R. 1. R. 154 ac., sec. 17. (25.) Owner, Jens Andreasen. Anthes, Emmit. Wf. Rose. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 80 ac., sec. 12. (21.) Owner, Don J. Preston. Anthes, Oscar. Wf. Sarah; ch. Mildred and Fay. P. O. Audubon, R. 4. O. 80 ac.,...

Postmasters and Postal Service in Norwich Vermont

It was fifteen years after the admission of Vermont into the Federal Union, and forty years after the settlement of the town, before Norwich had a post office. The first post office was established at Norwich Plain, July 1, 1805, and Jacob Burton was appointed postmaster. Postmaster Burton kept the office in his harness shop on the main street of the village, nearly opposite the present residence of Mrs. William E. Lewis. Probably the duties of the office were not so great as to interfere much with the prosecution of his trade. It is doubtful if Mr. Burton had more than two mails per week to distribute, and these were much smaller in bulk than either of the three daily mails now received at the village office. It is certain that less mail matter was then handled here in the course of a year than now in a week, although the territory accommodated at the office and the population of the town itself were each considerably greater than at present. It is safe to say, moreover, that the people now living in Norwich receive more letters and miscellaneous mail matter every year than did all the 150,000 inhabitants of Vermont in the year 1805. The post office is essentially a modern institution, whose importance and value increases year by year with cheaper postage and the general diffusion of cheap printed matter among the people. At the time of the admission of Vermont into the Union, in 1791, there were only five post offices in the State (at Brattleboro, Windsor, and Newbury on the Connecticut River, and at Bennington and...

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B. Williams, Hugh McGinn, Samuel Davis, William Reid, Charles B. Wood, Marion J. Willison, Herbert Dilno, Jerry Davidson, Edward Campbell, John Markham, Jason B. Johnson, Josiah A. Birchard, Richard S. Briggs, John Ewing, George Crowell, Henry Legge, James W. Johnston, Luther Tubbs, Oscar Munroe, John W. Manzer, Henry E. Hart, Leander B. Cook, Cyrus L. Higgins, Martin Avery, John M. Anson, Washington Wade, George P. Stevens, James Driscoll, Alexander A. Clark, Antoine Edwards, George Kocher, Charles W. Beers, Lester C. Spaulding, George Martin, Griffen Wilson, Sr., Amos W. Bowen, Josiah G. Stocking, Charles A. Turner, Levi 0. Johnson, Sullivan W. Gibson, Alonzo Chittenden. Benton Township. – Oliver P. Edman, Charles T. Ford, Emanuel Ream, Samuel Bradenberry, Isaac Mosher, Ezra W. Griffith, Joshua Wright, Michael Lynn, Mitchell Chalender, Luther Johnson, George A. Godsmark, George Wigent, Daniel Place, John J. DeWitt, Jay Henderson, William H. Barr, Josephus Sanborn, John C. Thomas, Michael Hamill, William Mitchell, Henry Thrall, William Motter, George Upright, Thomas J. Hitchcock, Asa Goodrich, Charles Albright, George Hoag, David Wise,...

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Slave Narrative of Mrs. Preston

Interviewer: G. Monroe Person Interviewed: Mrs. Preston Location: Madison, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana G. Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County SLAVE STORY MRS. PRESTON’S STORY Mrs. Preston is an old lady, 83 years old, very charming and hospitable She lives on North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana. Her first recollections of slavery were of sleeping on the foot of her mistress’ bed, where she could get up during the night to “feed” the fire with chips she had gathered before dark or to get a drink or anything else her mistress might want in the night. Her ‘Marse Brown’, resided in Frankfort having taken his best horses and hogs, and leaving his family in the care of an overseer on a farm. He was afraid the Union soldiers would kill him, but thought his wife would be safe. This opinion proved to be true. The overseer called the slaves to work at four o’clock, and they worked until six in the evening. When Mrs. Preston was a little older part of her work was to drive about a dozen cows to and from the stable. Many a time she warmed her bare feet in the cattle bedding. She said they did not always go barefooted but their shoes were old or their feet wrapped in rags. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY...

Biographical Sketch of Edwin F. Preston

Preston, Edwin F., New Haven, was born in Burlington, Vt., on March 4, 1857. He is a physician; was reared in Waltham, Vt., and began the study of medicine with Dr. C. W. B. Kidder, of Vergennes, Vt., in 1881; entered the medical department of the Burlington University in the spring of 1882, which he was graduated from in the fall of 1884, and immediately located in New Haven, Vt., where he has since resided. He was married on June 17, 1885, to Cora H. Holley, a daughter of Truman R. and Juliaette (Sanford) Holley, of Cornwall, Vt. He was a son of John and Ann E. (Hall) Preston. His father was a native of Ireland, and his mother of Shelburne, Vt., and were residents of this county for many years; they are now living in Waltham, Vt. They have had a family of twelve children, nine of whom are now living — Samuel J., Edwin F., Sarah (Mrs. A. J. Thompson), John P., Libbie L., Ethel H., Frank B., Wallace, and Nancy...

Biographical Sketch of John G. Preston

John G. Preston, farmer, Section 19, P. O. Oakland, is a native of England. In 1842, he came to America; in 1852, he engaged in railroading and continued in this business about twenty-eight years. In 1867, he purchased this land, and in the spring of 1880, located here. He owns 800 acres in this county, also 100 acres in Douglas County; is largely engaged in livestock, and now owns 135 head of cattle, and 125 hogs. About five teams are used in working this farm, which is one of the largest in this...

Pin It on Pinterest