Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Muster Roll of Captain Benjamin Beals’ Company

Muster Roll of Captain Benjamin Beals’ Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when mustered. Captain Benjamin Beals. Lieutenant Lora B. Stevens. Ensign Daniel Foss. Musicians George Austin. Leonard Griffin. Sergeants George Gould. John E. Sawyer David Wheeler, Ellas L. Lothrop. Corporals Harrison Rose. Loren Parcher. Gustavus Gilbert. William Day. Privates Additon, Charles A. Bishop, Zadoc. Carver, Caleb. Caswell, Chandler. Caswell, Marcus. Clark, Amos, Jr. Coffin, James, Jr. Cummings, Jesse A. Day, Samuel B. Dunn, David T. Foss, Levi. George, George W. Gilbert, John N. Gilbert, Judson. Grover, John. Gould, Joseph. Harvey, Harrison. Hodgdon, Ebenezer. Mitchell, Jesse. Palmer, Manley. Pettengill, Jason. Ricker, Harris. Sedgely, Edward. Stetson, Benjamin F. Stetson, Nathaniel. Stubbs, Lorenzo D. Thoms, Peter...

A Brief History of Norwich University

In 1835, the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy became “Norwich University,” by virtue of an act of incorporation granted by the legislature of Vermont the previous year. Captain Alden Partridge remained at the head of the institution until 1843, and soon after sold the buildings and grounds to the Trustees of the University. There was one feature in the scheme of education established at Norwich University which honorably distinguished it from nearly all other similar institutions of its time in New England. From the first it was wholly free from sectarian influence. This principle was prominently set forth in its charter as drawn by its founder, Captain Partridge, which provided “that no rules, laws or regulations of a sectarian character, either in religion or politics, should be adopted or imposed; nor shall any student ever be questioned or controlled on account of his religious or political belief by the Board of Trustees or the Faculty of said institution, either directly or indirectly. ” In his prospectus of the University, declaring the principles upon which it was founded, Captain Partridge begins as follows: ”Everything of a sectarian character in religion is utterly excluded from its walls. The founders of this Institution, as well as the legislature of Vermont which granted the act of incorporation, believed that there was no natural or necessary connection between the propagation of sectarian dogmas, and education rightly understood. They believed that the great object of education should be to prepare youth in the best possible manner for the correct and efficient discharge of the great duties of life, in any situation in which fortune...

Biography of George Pettengill

The subject of this review is one whose history touches the pioneer epoch in the annals of the state of Idaho, and whose days form an integral part of that indissoluble chain which linked the early formative period with that of latter day progress and prosperity. Not alone is there particular interest attaching to his career as one of the pioneers of Idaho, but in reviewing his genealogical record we find his lineage tracing back to the colonial history of the nation and to that period which marked the inception of the grandest republic the world has ever known. Through such sources have we attained the true American type, and along this line must our investigations proceed if we would learn of the steadfast and unyielding elements which constitute the basis upon which has been reared the lofty and magnificent superstructure of an en-lightened and favored commonwealth. In 1620 Richard Pettengill was born in Staffordshire, England, and in 1641 he landed on the shores of New England, there to found a family that has sent its branches out into various sections of the country. He married Johanna Ingersol, and their son, Samuel, was married February 3, 1674, to Sarah Poor. On the 18th of December. 1692, was born to them a son, to whom they gave the name of Benjamin. He was the father of Andrew P. Pettengill, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch. He was born in 1742 and removed to Salisbury, New Hampshire, where he married Miss Sarah Abigail Greely, who was born in 1749. Their son, David Pettengill, father of our subject, was born...

Pin It on Pinterest