Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Slave Narrative of Mollie Williams

Person Interviewed: Mollie Williams Location: Terry, Mississippi Age: 83 Mollie Williams, who lives two miles west of Terry, Miss., tells her story: “Iffen I lives’ til nex’ September 15, I’ll be eighty fo’! I was born ’bout three miles frum Utica on de Newsome place. Me an’ brudder Hamp b’longed to Marse George Newsome. Marse George was named afte’ George Washington up in Virginny whar he come frum. Miss Margurite was our mistiss. My mammy? Well, I’ll have to tell you now ’bout her. “You see, Marse George come off down here frum Virginny lak young folks venturin’ ’bout, an’ mar’ied Mis’ Margurite an’ wanted to start up livin’ right over thar near Utica whar I was born. But Marse George was po’, an’ he sho’ foun’ out ye can’t make no crop wid’out’n a start of darkies, so he writ home to Virginny fer to git some darkies. All dey sont him was fo’ mens an’ old Aunt Harriet fer to cook. “One day Marse George an’ his Uncle, Mr. John Davenport—now thar was a rich man fer ye, why, he had two carri’ge drivers—dey rid over to Grand Gulf whar dey was a sellin’ slabes offen de block an’ Mr. John tol’ Marse George to pick hisself out a pair of darkies to mate so’s he could git hisself a start of darkies fer to chop his cotton an’ like. So Marse George pick out my pappy fust. My pappy come frum North Ca’lina. Den he seen my mammy an’ she was big an’ strengthy an’ he wanted her pow’ful bad. But lak I tol’ you, he...

Slave Narrative of Sarah Anderson

Interviewer: Mrs. Bernice Bowden Person Interviewed: Sarah Anderson Location: 3815 W. Second Avenue, Pine Bluff, Arkansas Age: 78? “I don’t know when I was born. When the Civil War ended, I was bout four or five years old. “I jes’ remember when the people come back—the soldiers—when the War ended. We chillun run under the house. That was the Yankees. “I was born in Bibb County, Georgia. That’s where I was bred and born. “I been in Arkansas ever since I was fourteen. That was shortly after the Civil War, I reckon. We come here when they was emigratin’ to Arkansas. I’m tellin’ you the truth, I been here a long time. “I member when the soldiers went by and we chillun run under the house. It was the Yankee cavalry, and they made so much noise. Dat’s what the old folks told us. I member dat we run under the house and called our self hidin’. “My master was Madison Newsome and my missis was Sarah Newsome. Named after her? Must a done it. Ma and her chillun was out wallowin’ in the dirt when the Yankees come by. Sometimes I stayed in the house with my white folks all night. “My mother and father say they was well treated. That’s what they say. “Old folks didn’t low us chillun round when they was talkin’ bout their business, no ma’am. “We stayed with old master a good while after freedom—till they commenced emigratin’ from Georgia to Arkansas. Yes ma’am! “I’m the mother of fourteen chillun—two pairs of twins. I married young—bout fifteen or sixteen, I reckon. I married...

Henry C. Newsome

Private, Med. Corps, 81st Div., 306th Regt., Amntn. Tr. Born in Union County; son of A. M. and Mrs. Sally Newsome. Husband of Mrs. Jennie W. Newsome. Entered service April 25, 1918, at Marshville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 8, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Returned to USA June, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson June 24,...

Pin It on Pinterest