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Descendants of Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman of Taunton, MA

CUSHMAN (Taunton family). The Cushman family of Taunton here briefly reviewed, the family and lineage of the late Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman, long one of the leading citizens and substantial men of Taunton, at one time the city’s chief executive officer, and who had served most efficiently in both branches of the city government, as alderman and councilman, and who in turn has been followed by his son, Seth Leonard Cushman, Esq., who for many years has been president of the Bristol County National Bank, is a branch of the family bearing the name of ancient Plymouth, which with its allied connections is one of the historic families of New England. Its progenitor, though of short life in New England, was one of the leading spirits in all the preliminary movements in both England and Holland incident to the coming of the “Mayflower” Pilgrims to New England, where his descendants soon allied themselves with those of the “Mayflower” passengers. There follow in brief some of the incidents in the lives of members of this Taunton family, and in those of their forefathers, in chronological order beginning with Robert Cushman, one of the leaders among the Pilgrims. Robert Cushman, a wool carder of Canterbury, England, married (second) at Leyden, Holland, June 3, 1617, Mary, widow of Thomas Chingleton, of Sandwich, England. He was associated with William Brewster as agent of the Leyden Church in negotiations for removal. He came to New England in the “Fortune” in 1621, bringing with him his only son, Thomas. He returned to England on business of the Colony, and died there in 1626. He left...

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of the county (ten towns reported) was then but 1,205, mostly confined to the first and second tiers of towns west of the Connecticut River. Twenty years later, in 1791, Hartland led all the towns of the county with 1,652 inhabitants, Woodstock and Windsor coming next with 1,605 and 1,542 respectively. Exceptional causes made the little town of Guilford (now numbering scarcely more than one thousand inhabitants), till after the year 1800, the most populous town in the state. In Norwich, the great falling off in the size of families in recent years is seen in the fact, that in the year 1800, the number of children of school age was 604, out of a total population of 1,486, while in 1880 with a nearly equal population (1,471) it was but 390. In the removal of large numbers of the native-born inhabitants by emigration, we must find the principal cause of the decline of our rural population. Preeminently is this true of Norwich. The outflow of people began very early and now for more than a century there has been one unbroken, living stream of emigration pouring over our borders. Several families that had first located here became, before the close of the Revolutionary War, the pioneer settlers of Royalton, Tunbridge, and Randolph. Some of...

History of Norwich Vermont Education

From the town records it appears that the first attempt to divide the town into school districts, was at a town meeting held November 19, 1782, when John Slafter, Elijah Brownson, Ithamar Bartlett, Joseph Loveland, Paul Bingham, Joseph Hatch, Daniel Baldwin, Abel Wilder and Samuel Brown, Jr., were made a committee for that purpose. Soon thereafter the committee reported that they “could effect nothing on the business of their appointment,” and were discharged. No further move in town meeting towards districting the town for school purposes appears to have been made until March 30, 1785, when, on petition of persons residing in the southeastern part of the town, the territory, to be described, was embraced in a district designated as the “First School District: Beginning at the southeast bound of Norwich; thence running on the line between Hartford and Norwich, two miles; thence northerly so wide as to include Benjamin Hatch and Benjamin Burton and Mr. John Knight; thence easterly so as to take into s’d district Nathaniel Brown, Esq., Esquire Elisha Partridge and the Rev. Lyman Potter; thence due east to Connecticut River.” At a town meeting held March 14, 1791, districts Nos. 1 to 12, both inclusive, were established; March 13, 1798, district No. 13 was organized; No. 14 (from the consolidation of districts 9 and 10) in 1818; No. 15 (Bicknell), in 1827; No. 16, March, 1828; No. 17, June, 1828; No. 19, March, 1834; No. 20, Oct. 20, 1834; No. 18 (Podunk), 1841. At a town meeting held in May, 1834, it was “voted to set off Ira Baxter, Isaac Partridge, Cyrus Partridge, and Calvin...

Norwich Vermont in the War of 1812

In the spring of 1812, war with Great Britain again seemed imminent. Causes of complaint against the aggressions of the British government had existed for a long time, and the irritation was now increasing on all sides. It did not seem possible that actual war could much longer be postponed, although public opinion in the United States was still far from unanimous for an immediate appeal to arms. Norwich, as had been her wont in Revolutionary times, again let her voice be heard when great public and national interests were being agitated before the people. At the close of a town meeting held June 18, 1812, a paper was presented to the meeting containing the preamble and resolutions which we copy below. On account of the great length of the preamble, we are obliged to abridge it considerably. The document was obviously drawn up with much care by some person familiar with the political history of the country. After some debate the clerk was directed to read the paper. A spirited discussion ensued, and the preamble and resolutions were finally adopted by a large majority, as true in their statement of facts and expressive of the sense of the town on the question at issue. It was voted that the same be put* on record in the town clerk’s office. A final clause appended to the fourth resolution denouncing in severe terms as enemies of their country that portion of the Federal party who were at that time most unsparing in their criticisms of the war policy of President Madison, and the measures of Congress then pending to procure...

Biography of Garner Miner

For thirty-eight years Garner Miner has been a resident of Idaho, having come to the territory in 1861, when the development of this great northwest was in its incipiency and the frontiersmen had to meet many privations and dangers. The Indians were frequently on the warpath, carrying death and devastation wherever they went; and separated from the base of sup-plies, from the comforts and luxuries of the east the pioneers endured hardships undreamed of by the present generation. In those days brave hearts were necessary, indeed, but the same spirit of Anglo-Saxon daring, fortitude and stability, which, has characterized the people of this fair land from its earliest colonization, and has carried the English language and English supremacy to all parts of the globe, found renewed manifestations among the mountains and valleys of Idaho, and thus were laid the foundations of the state, which now occupies a prominent place in the great galaxy of states west of the Mississippi. In all the work of progress and development, in the task of subduing the wild land to the purposes of civilization. Garner Miner bore his part, and now in the evening of life is living retired at his pleasant home in Caldwell, enjoying a well earned rest. Mr. Miner was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on the 5th of November 1822, his parents being John and Mary (Marshall) Miner, also natives of the Nutmeg state. In their family were five children. Garner Miner attended school in New Haven and in New York and subsequently removed to Ohio, where he worked at the carpenter’s and millwright’s trades. He was married in...

Timothy Todd of Rutland VT

Timothy Todd5, (Timothy4, Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born May 16, 1758, died Dec. 1, 1806, married Nov. 27, 1783, Phebe, daughter of Jehiel Buel of Killingworth, Conn. “Timothy Todd was sergeant after the Lexington Alarm, served as coast guard 150 days. Enlisted May 15, 1780.” He was a physician in Southern Vermont. Dr. Todd removed to Arlington, Vermont, having previously seen Vermont while in the Continental army as he was engaged in the battle of Bennington. “He was active, resolute and Persevering, his professional reputation rising and he soon had an extensive medical practice.” He was a man of considerable literary taste and talent, and wrote many medical and other articles for the journals of the day, and on various occasions pronounced popular orations. A curious little memorandum book of his, still preserved, contains, in his own hand writing, “an abstract view of the miscellaneous writings of Timothy Todd, the unfortunate.” The catalog gives the titles of orations, contributions to magazines, poems and plays, some of which were acted, and some operas, most of them having reference to politics. He was a Freemason and termed a noted mason. He joined the military and bore a captain’s commission. Represented Arlington for at least five years in the General Assembly, and for three years he was a member of the Governor’s Council, a body of twelve men which, under the old Colonial Constitution, took the place of the Senate. At the time of his withdrawal from public life he was on the point of being elected Governor. A few months before his last child was born, the doctor moved from Arlington to...

Ellen Jerusha Todd Miner of Cornwall CT

MINER, Ellen Jerusha Todd7, (Carrington6, Daniel5, Daniel4, Daniel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Jan. 24, 1825, in Cornwall, Conn., died (???) 19–, married April 8, 1846, Luther Miner, Jr., who was born June 22, 1818, died Feb. 21, 1875. Children: I. Harriet Elizabeth, b. July 9, 1848, m. Jan. 13, 1869, Wilbur F. Harrison, who was b. in 1845, d. April 13, 1890. She lives now (1914) in Madison, Conn. II. John Luther, b. Nov. 30, 1849, m. Sept. 2, 1875, Sarah A. Higley, who was b. June 8, 1845, d. Dec. 17, 1905. Issue: (1) Lorin Luther, b. Jan. 20, 1878. III. Almon Lewis, b. Nov. 1, 1854, m. May 15, 1878, Katherine L. Whitney, who was b. April 22, 1856, d. April 22, 1901. Issue: (1) Grace Elizabeth b. March 8, 1879, m. Dec. 22, 1896, Levi Van Dorn Lippincott, who was b. April 9, 1871. Issue: (a)Whitney Van Dorn, b. April 2, 1899; (b) Almon Miner b. Dec. 5, 1904; (2) William Whitney, b. Nov. 6, 1880, m. July 19, 1905, Lena Gertrude Parmalee, who was b. July 10, 1886, d. July 31, 1906. Issue: (a) Doris Catherine, b. July 30, 1906; (3) Mary Ellen, b. Aug. 13, 1883; (4) Katherine Ruth, b. June 6, 1887; (5) Ernestine, b. Aug. 18, 1892; (6) Dorothy Swift, b. March 16, 1900. IV. Ellen Rebecca, b. May 21, 1859, m. Feb. 13, 1884, Frank C. Dowd. Issue: (1) Marion Louise, b. March 9, 1885; (2) Rachel, b. Sept. 12, 1886; (3) George, d. May 18, 1888; (4) John Douglass, b. Sept. 16, 1890; (5) Frances Miner, b. July 3, 1895; (6)...

Biography of Alfred B. Miner

Alfred B. Miner, one of the leading and representative businessmen of Colton, and as the president of the Colton Packing Company is at the head of one of the most important industries of that city. Mr. Miner is a native of Michigan, dating his birth in Genesee County in 1842. His father, Pilo Miner, was reared in Genesee County, New York, and was an early settler in Michigan, and engaged in farming. Mr. Miner was reared to farm life, and given a fair education in the public schools. He was an energetic and thorough worker, but he was never intended for a farmer; as soon as he reached his majority he struck out in life, locating in Chicago. There he engaged in business pursuits, and was for the next ten years employed by the well-known firm of Tyler, Graham & Co., as a traveling agent and salesman. In 1876 he was prostrated by sickness and compelled to abandon his labor. The next eighteen months was spent by Mr. Miner in seeking a restoration of his health. Failing in that, he decided to seek the milder climate of the Pacific coast, and in 1877 he came to California and located at San Jose. His first occupation in that city was as a clerk in a grocery store, but his business talents soon gained him recognition in business circles, and he obtained a position with the San Jose Fruit Packing Company, first as clerk and later as their general agent and salesman. He was also agent for Speckles & Co., of San Francisco, and later agent for the American Sugar Refinery...

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