Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel. Woven in the narratives of it’s people, however, is the story of Colorado. Initial expeditions by European settlers in this area were for trade with the Natives or as a throughfare to California further west. It wasn’t until one of those wagon trains came a man name of Ralston and he dipped his pan into a creek which would later bare his name and pulled out a troy ounce of gold, worth $5 at the time. A decade later, and other miners began to claim the land in the eastern Colorado area. Pushing ever westward in search of the golden dust they eventually found their way into western Coloado. Some of these miners would eventually settle in the area of their mines and became Colorado’s first residents. Some would have their claim luck out and would stay taking up other responsibilities such as ranching, politics, merchandising, etc. In these people’s lives became the story of Colorado – so while this volume is comprised almost solely of biographies, it is also comprised of the history of early Western Colorado. Click on the page number to view the biography. SurnameGivenMiddleView Bio BurgerFrankMPage 17 TaylorEdwardTPage 18 ZerbeAllenLPage 21 VeatchWilliamLPage 23 HarpHoraceSPage 24 GeorgeAlfredPage 25 BrownHoraceGPage 26 HeatonWilliamVPage 27 ThompsonBenjaminHPage 28 WatsonBenjaminKPage 29 SherwoodBenjaminPage 30 DicksonAmosJPage...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Biography of Hon. Robert P. Henry

The son of a Revolutionary soldier and the representative of a distinguished family was Robert P. Henry. He was born in 1788 in Scott County, Ky., where his father, Gen. William Henry, had settled among the first in that region. He graduated in Transylvania University at Lexington, and studied law with Henry Clay. In 1809 he was admitted to the bar, and the same year was appointed Commonwealth’s Attorney for the district. He served in the war of 1812 as aid to his father, with the rank of Major. In 1811 he married Miss Gabriella F. Pitts, of Georgetown, Ky., and some years after the close of the war of 1812 he removed to Christian County, where he continued to reside to the end of his life. Soon after he came to Hopkinsville he was appointed Commonwealth’s Attorney, a position he filled with ability. He was elected to Congress from this district in 1823, and re-elected in 1825. As a member of the Committee on “Roads and Canals ” was instrumental in obtaining the first appropriation ever granted for the improvement of the Mississippi River. While in Congress he was appointed a Judge of the Court of Appeals, an honor he declined. He died suddenly before the close of his second congressional term, and before he had hardly reached the prime of life. As a lawyer, Mr. Henry was positive in his positions when taken. He rapidly gained a practice, which steadily increased until he entered the political field. He was a good pleader, and his address to a jury was always clear, logical and often eloquent. His mental...

Ball Play amongst the Choctaws

To the ancient Choctaw warrior and hunter, excitement of some kind was indispensable to relieve the tedium of the nothing-to-do in which a great part of his life was spent. Hence the intervals between war and hunting were filled up by various amusements, ball plays, dances, foot and horse races, trials of strength and activity in wrestling and jumping, all of which being regulated by rules and regulations of a complicated etiquette.

Biography of James N. McClure

JAMES N. McCLURE. – In the person of the gentleman of whom who now write, we have one of those men, who have passed almost their entire life in this county, and hence are familiar with its resources and advantages in every department. James N. McClure was born on January 2, 1858, in Eugene, Marion county, Oregon, whence six years later he came with his parents, Charles M. and Laura V. (Pierce) McClure, to this county and here he has received his education and grown to his present prominent position in the county, having manifested, in the long years in which he has moved in the business and social circles of this realm, an uprightness, born of sound principles, and integrity and worth coupled with sagacity, that have given him a very enviable prestige throughout the county and stamped him as one of its most substantial and worthy citizens. When he came to this county he made his home with his parents until 1887 and then launched out into the world in independent action. In 1886, he purchased his present home of one hundred and sixty acres, which is situated eight miles south from Lagrande. The farm is well improved and every where hears testimony to thrift and industry. He has one of the finest orchards in the county and is skillful in the production of the fruits of the soil, and in raising stock. On January 2, 1887, the marriage of Mr. McClure and Miss Helen D., daughter of Mary A. Earl, was solemnized. They have been blessed with the advent of the following children. Harley E., Lucy,...
Page 1 of 212

Pin It on Pinterest