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Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the first Theodore, b. in Boston in 1636, m. Sarah Myrick, Apr. 27, 1664, and lived on the side of the “Upper Green,” in Newburyport, Mass. His son, John Atkinson, m. Sarah Woodman, in 1693, and had Thomas, b. Mar. 16, 1694, who m. Mary Pike, of Salisbury, Aug. 5, 17 19. He was the father of: Humphrey Atkinson, b. June 12, 1720; m. Sarah Hale, of Newburyport, May 25, 1743, and lived in that town until 1760, when he came to Buxton. He had purchased land in the township previously; was a shipwright. He d. in 1775, and with his wife was buried at Pleasant Point. Children named as follows, being born in Newbury: Sarah Atkinson, b. June 25, 1744; m. Jabez Bradbury. Joseph Atkinson, b. Aug. 24, 1745; m. Olive, dau. of Capt. Joseph Woodman, Dec. 18, 1767, and in 1769 his father conveyed to him forty acres of land, upon which he settled and died. He was deacon of the Baptist church. He and his brother m....

The Original Grantees of Norwich Vermont

The following is a list of men who received grants of land in the future town of Norwich Vermont on 5 July 1761. Most of these men resided in and around Mansfield Connecticut. Many of the men never set foot in the actual town of Norwich, choosing at some point not to accept Eleaer Wales Daniel Welch Abner Barker Ebenezer Wales Ebenezer Heath William Johnson ye 3d Gideon Noble James West Daniel Baldwin Calvin Topliff Samuel Johnson Elisha Wales Seth Wales Amos Fellows Jedidiah Brinton John Fowler Nathan Strong Robert Turner William Johnson Samuel Root Solomon Wales Joseph Blanchard Josiah Root Adoniram Grant George Swain Samuel Root junr Benja Jennings Moses Holmes Benjamin Sheapard Elisha Carpenter Lemuel Holmes Abner Barker Jr. Nathaniel Harriman Samuel Long Ebenezer Smith John Johnson Thomas Welch Joseph Storrs Samuel Cobb Judah Heath James Russell Hezekiah Johnson Jonathan Hatch Samuel Slafter Benja Whitney James Bicknall Jacob Fenton Moses Barnard AleazerWest Andrew Crocker Eliphas Hunt Stephen Palmer Eleazr Warner Abijah Learned The Hon. Theodore Atkinson Esq. Richard Wilbird Esq. Henry Sherburne Esq. Mr. Andrew Clarkson Clement March Esq. John Shackford Mesheck Weare Esq. Rev. Mr. Samuel Havem Peter Gilman...

John Gyles Captivity Narrative – Indian Captivities

John Gyles captivity narrative provides a stunning display of Abenaki culture and lifestyle, as it was in the 1690’s. John was 10 years old when he was taken captive in the attack on Pemaquid (Bristol Maine) and his narrative provides an accounting of his harrowing treatment by his Indian captors, as well as the three years exile with his French owners at Jemseg New Bruswick. His faith in Christ remains central in the well-being of his mind throughout his ordeal.

March, Nellie – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Nellie March, 85, of La Grande, died May 10 at a local care home. A celebration of life will begin at 2 p.m. Thursday at the First Christian Church in La Grande. A complete obituary will be available later. Loveland Funeral Chapel & Crematory is in charge of arrangements. La Grande Observer – Obituaries for the day of May 12, 2008 ___________________________________ Nellie March, 85, of La Grande, died May 10. A celebration of life will begin at 2 p.m. Thursday at the First Christian Church in La Grande. A viewing will precede from 9 a.m. to noon at Loveland Funeral Chapel. Burial will be at Restlawn Cemetery in Salem. Loveland Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Nellie Stella Antonichuk was born July 1, 1922, to John and Stella Antonichuk at home in Star City, Saskatchewan, Canada. She married Stephen March on July 18, 1944. Nellie and Steve emigrated to the United States in 1947 and made their home in Santa Cruz, Calif., and Eugene. Nellie moved to La Grande in 2003 after her husband’s death. Nellie went to school in a one-room schoolhouse and helped her parents raise her younger siblings along with working on the farm. Nellie’s love of flowers, dancing, music, cooking and gardening and her pride in her Ukranian heritage have been passed on to her children and grandchildren. Above all else, family was most important in Nellie’s life. Nellie was one of 11 children in a close-knit family that continues to have reunions in Canada every four years. Survivors include three children and their families, Patricia March and Michael Mullett...

Biography of T. J. March, Sr.

T. J. March, Sr., dealer in furniture, Charleston; was born in Baltimore, Md., March 22, 1807; he is the only son of John and Eliza March; losing his father in early childhood, he was very early in life thrown upon his own resources; at the age of 8 years, he was placed in a tailor shop, where he was put to ripping up old clothes, after which he worked successively for a tobacconist in stripping tobacco, in a chair-factory, learning to bottom chairs, and in a sieve-factory. In his 15th year, he began learning the house-joiner’s trade, and on becoming of age, went to Philadelphia, where he followed his trade up to 1835, two years of which time he spent in the employ of Stephen Girard, and helped to build the large and elegant structures composing Girard’s Square. He was married March 22, 1831, to Miss Rosina D. Creighton, a daughter of John and Margaret Creighton, of Philadelphia; she was born in that city November 1, 1810; they have had nine children, five of whom are living – Thomas J. (of Charleston), Lizzie I. (wife of J. M. Ashmore, of Charleston), George A. (of Downey, Los Angeles Co., Cal.), Robert A. (of Charleston) and Rosina D. (now Mrs. H. E. Brooks, of Charleston). On the 4th of July, 1835, Mr. March left Philadelphia and removed to Louisville, Ky., and in March, 1836, came to Coles Co.; he put up a rail cabin ten feet square in what is now Morgan Tp., and there lived with his family for three months, when they removed to Charleston; after following his trade...

Oliver March & Co.,

Oliver March & Co., proprietors of the Dodge City Steam Flouring Mills. These mills were erected in the fall of 1879. Size 60×90 feet, three stories and basement, built of wood at a cost of $20,000. Capacity is 15,000 pounds of flour in twenty-four hours. They employ four men. Oliver Marsh and son became proprietors in 1882. Mr. Marsh first came to Central City, Anderson Co., Kan., with his family in 1857, built a hotel and opened a general store. In 1859 he became a licensed Indian Trader with J. A. Coffey, at Humboldt, Kan., and remained until 1864, when they moved to Kansas City, Mo., and embarked in the wholesale grocery trade three years. He then went to Chetopa, Labette Co., and engaged in merchandising and the stock business for eleven years. He then came to Dodge City and engaged in the mercantile milling business. He was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, October 21, 1826; lived there with his parents for twelve years and came with them to Fort Madison, Iowa, where he lived until twenty-one-years old, when he came to Kansas. He was married in 1852 to Miss Clarissa A. Smiley, of Urbania, Ohio. They have four children-Grace A., Arthur E., Stephen and Mark. Mrs. Marsh is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Dodge City. Mr. Marsh is a member of Blue Lodge,...

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