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Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

Stover Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Jeremiah Stover. He was born in Penobscot Dec. 5, 1770; came to Blue Hill a young man, built the house referred to before 1800. He married, Dec. 16, 1793, Abigail Devereux. He was a farmer and tanner and currier. The family consisted of nine children, as follows: Lois, Abigail, Jonathan, Hannah, Newton, Jeremiah, Lydia, Cynthia, and Martha.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Harris Family Genealogy of East Bridgewater Massachusetts

The Harris family here briefly considered — that of some of the descendants of the late Deacon and Hon. William Harris, of East Bridgewater, who for a quarter of a century was town clerk, for several years town treasurer, and a representative in the Massachusetts General Court — is one of the ancient and honorable families of the Bridgewaters. Deacon Harris’s son, the late Hon. Benjamin Winslow Harris, lawyer, statesman and judge through nearly sixty years, had a long, useful and honored public career; and his son, Hon. Robert Orr Harris, has for thirty years held a high place at the bar of his county and State, and been honored in the old home town of the family, being for nine years district attorney (an honor long before bestowed upon his father), a representative in the General Court of the State, later judge of the Superior court of Massachusetts, and now Congressman from the Fourteenth Massachusetts district. Sketches of the careers of these men, together with their family history and Harris lineage from their first known American ancestor, chronologically arranged, follow: (I) Arthur Harris, of Duxbury as early as 1640, became one of the original proprietors of Bridgewater and was among the first settlers in West Bridgewater. He removed to Boston, where he made his will in 1673, and where he died June 10, 1674. The Christian name of his wife was Martha. His children were (perhaps others): Isaac Harris.* Samuel Harris. Martha Harris. Mary Harris. (II) Isaac Harris, son of Arthur, married (first) Mercy, daughter of Robert Latham, and (second) Mary, daughter of Robert Dunbar, of Hingham. He...

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