Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to the number of 34,555 for the defense of the Union. Of the 178 men enlisting from Norwich, twenty-seven laid down their young lives in the service of the country. The soil of every southern state, from the Potomac to the Rio Grande, was moistened by the blood or supplied a grave to one or more of these. The town paid the larger part of these men liberal bounties, amounting to about $32,000, in addition to their state and government pay. All calls for men upon the town by the national authorities were promptly and fully met. The patriotic response of our people to the expenses and sacrifices of the war was, in general, hearty and emphatic; and yet candor and the truth of history compels us to confess that there were here, as in most other towns throughout the north, a few disloyal spirits who sympathized with the Slaveholders’ rebellion, who denounced the war from beginning to end, and who scarcely concealed their satisfaction when news came of rebel...

Biography of Maj. Harrison H. Hilton

MAJOR HARRISON H. HILTON. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch is one of the prosperous old-time merchants of Arkansas, and is one of the pioneers of the section in which he resides. He has fought the hard battle of life bravely and well, has bent the force of circumstances to his will, and although he began at the bottom round of the ladder, he has attained an enviable place at the top through sheer force of character. He was born in Ashe County, N. C., in 1826, a son of Christopher and Josephine (Wolf) Hilton, who were born in Rockingham County, Virginia, their marriage taking place in the Old North State. After residing there for some time they returned to their native county in Virginia, where the father died in 1831, at about the age of sixty-five years, having been a farmer throughout life. The mother died in Monroe County, Tennessee, and Harrison H. Hilton is her only surviving child, a daughter having died many years ago. At the age of fourteen years the subject of this sketch came West and began farming on the Arkansas River, near Clarksville, Johnson County, Arkansas In 1850 he took up his residence at Bellefonte, Boone County, where, in 1861, he organized the First Arkansas Battalion of Confederate Cavalry and was at once given the rank of major. He served until captured near Marshfield, Missouri, in 1863, and after being kept a prisoner at St. Louis for a time was paroled. During his service he was on scouting duty the most of the time. At the close of the war he went...

Pin It on Pinterest