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Descendancts of John Remington of Haverhill, MA

As early as 1661 John Remington and his wife Abigail were at Haverhill, where their children, Daniel and Hannah, were born. John Remington is credited by one writer as being the emigrant ancestor from Wales of the Rhode Island Remingtons. He appears of record as early as 1669 at Jamestown, R. I., where Aug. 28th of that year he and two others were ordered to assemble inhabitants of Conanicut Island to consider what might be most suitable for defense and preservation against any invasion or insurrection of the Indians. He had been earlier at Haverhill, Mass. (1661), and Andover. He was one of the grantees in 1677 of what became East Greenwich, R. I. He and his sons were taxed in 1680. In 1695 he gave his son Thomas Remington, of Warwick, a deed for his Haverhill interests, and redeeded to him the same in 1709, he then being apparently of Warwick, R. I., the former deed having become “damnified through disaster.”

Dedham Massachusetts Historical Society Register 1890-1903

From 1890-1903, the Dedham Historical Society in Dedham Massachusetts printed a quarterly pamphlet for it’s historical society called the “Dedham Historical Register.” In this pamphlet a variety of genealogical data was published on families of Dedham and the villages emanating from the early residents of Dedham, such as Dorchester, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Needham, and Sharon, etc.

Howard Family of Brockton Massachusetts

This article is to treat particularly of the John Haward/Howard branch of the family to which belonged the late Daniel S. Howard, who was one of Brockton’s foremost citizens and most successful shoe manufacturers; his brother, Gorham B. Howard, now retired, who for a number of years was one of that city’s successful merchants, engaged in the dry goods business; and the former’s sons, Warren A. Howard, now deceased, who for years was extensively engaged in the manufacture of shoes, and Daniel S. Howard, Jr., who is president of the Emerson Shoe Company, of Rockland, Massachusetts.

People and Buildings of the Choctaw Nation

The missionaries found the precepts of the Choctaw’s to be moral; and also that they respected old age, and kept fresh in memory the wise councils of their; fathers, whose lessons of wisdom the experience of the past, taught their youthful minds to look upward, and whose teachings they did not forget in their mature years. Their tenderness to and watchful care of the aged and infirm was truly remarkable; they looked upon home and regarded their country as sacred institutions, and in the defense of which they freely staked their lives; they also inculcated a high regard for parents, and were always courteous by instinct as well as by teaching; they held in high veneration the names of the wise, the good, and the brave of their ancestors, and from their sentiment toward the dead grew sweet flowers in the heart. They believed that integrity alone was worthy of station, and that promotion should rest on capacity and faithfulness; they also had swift and sure methods of dealing with the incorrigible, official or private; nor were they impatient of the slow processes of the years but knew how to wait in faith and contentment; and if they were not as progressive, as our opinion demands in its rush for gain and pompous show, they had at least conquered the secret of National and individual steadfastness. Today we are a prodigal and wasteful people; the Indians are frugal and economical. In 14 months after the location of the mission at Elliot by the indefatigable perseverance of Mr. Kingsbury, a sufficiency of houses were erected, a school was opened, and...

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Biographical Sketch of George Hawes

George Hawes, son of John, was born in Barre, Mass. He married Eunice M., daughter of Joseph Day, of Chesterfield, N. H., in 1858, and lived in Worcester, Mass., where he was engaged in railroad business about twenty years. He removed to this town in 1870, where he now resides. He has an adopted daughter, Bessie B., who was the daughter of Willis Bemis, of Brattleboro,...

Biographical Sketch of Frank B. Hawes

Frank B. Hawes, son of David Hawes and brother of Major Charles W. Hawes, was born in the City of Rock Island on November 14, 1844. (See biographies David Hawes and Major Charles W. Hawes). Since April 13, 1891, the subject of this sketch has been prominently connected with the head offices of the Modern Woodmen of America. For years he was the society’s statistician, but of late years he has discharged the responsible duties of chief of the final accounting department. He has supervision over the most important set of accounts maintained by the Modern Woodmen Society-the financial. It is naturally to be inferred that Mr. Hawes possesses superior ability as an accountant and mathematician. Prior to the establishment of his connection with the Modern Woodmen Society, Mr. Hawes was for twenty-one years the cashier of the E. P. Reynolds & Company railroad contracting firm. During the period 1860-1890, inclusive, this firm built thousands of miles of western railroad, and Mr. Hawes as cashier, handled millions of dollars without the loss of a single cent. In 1875 Mr. Hawes was united in wedlock to Miss Elizabeth A Rector, of Walworth, Wisconsin. One son, David R , a graduate of the Illinois School of Dentistry, University of Illinois, is the fruit of this union. Mr. Hawes is recognized as one of Rock Island’s most progressive citizens. He is active in his support of all policies and measures making for the betterment of Rock Island and the country at large. In national politics, he has always been an ardent and influential supporter of Republican principles. With his family, he resides...

Biography of Major Charles W. Hawes

Major Charles W. Hawes is probably the oldest male “native” of Rock Island, Illinois, born within the Village of Stephenson, now embraced in the city limits of Rock Island, prior to 1842. His father was David Hawes, a native of Belchertown, Massachusetts, and his mother was Julia M. Babcock, a native of   Ware, Massachusetts, both of Revolutionary stock. (See biography David Hawes) Major Hawes’s father arrived in Rock Island from Massachusetts via St. Louis and the Mississippi River in October, 1835, where Mrs. Hawes joined him later, and Major Hawes was born March 7, 1841. He had the advantage of a better education than most frontier boys of his day, attending the Harsha Academy at Dixon, Illinois, after graduating from the local schools. At the outbreak of the War in 1861, he was serving as deputy sheriff under his father, who was then Sheriff of Rock Island County. On July 20, 1861, Major Hawes enlisted in Company A, of the Thirty-seventh Illinois Infantry, Volunteers, being made first sergeant of the Company. The Companies of the Regiment assembled at Camp Webb, Chicago, Illinois, and it was there, while the Regiment of raw recruits was being whipped into fighting condition, that Major Hawes received his first promotion. He was commissioned second Lieutenant on August 10, 1861. On December 31, 1861, he was commissioned as first Lieutenant, and on July 20, 1862, one year from the date of his enlistment, he was raised to the rank of Captain. As Captain of his Company, Major Hawes served with credit in the Army of the Frontier, later known as the Thirteenth Army Corps, of...

Biography of Mrs. Mary Fay Hawes

Mrs. Mary Fay Hawes, wife of Major Charles W. Hawes, and a member of the board of supreme managers of the Royal Neighbors of America, is an admirable type of the purposeful woman of the day. She proves in her own person that the American woman may exert a powerful influence in the enlargement of woman’s sphere without loss to any of the attributes of true womanhood. Mrs. Hawes was born in Fulton, Illinois, July 22, 1866, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Fay, and the eldest of a family of nine children, all living at this date. She graduated from high school in May, 1883, and spent the following two years in the Northern Illinois College at Fulton. In 1887 Mrs. Hawes, then Miss Fay, engaged in a clerical capacity with the Modern Woodmen of America, the head offices of which were at that time located at Fulton. She continued with the Society for several years, a valued attache of the head office, and thus met Major Hawes, who was elected head clerk of the Society in 1890. Her marriage to Major Hawes on December 25, 1894, marked her retirement from the Woodmen Society’s employ; but shortly thereafter, having been actively identified with the Royal Neighbors of America, the ladies auxiliary of the Modern Woodmen of America, she was chosen as one of its board of supreme managers. She has been re-elected at each succeeding national convention since January, 1895, and her present term expires in May, 1908. Mrs. Hawes, in American fraternal circles, is widely known; indeed, is one of that circle of able women...

Biography of David Hawes

David Hawes, the subject of this biography, father of Major Chas. W. and Frank B. Hawes, was born in Belchertown, Massachusetts, October 19, 1809, and died in Rock Island, Illinois, April 20, 1900, aged ninety years six months and one day. In all that makes for good citizenship, it may be truly said that David Hawes was a model. He was one of the earliest settlers of Rock Island His grandfather, John Hawes, was a Revolutionary soldier, fighting with the American patriots at Lexington and Bunker Hill, and later participating in the capture of Ticonderoga, being wounded in this latter engagement. David Hawes resided in Massachusetts until 1835, when, in company with Lemuel Andrews, his brother-in-law, he set his face westward. He reached St. Louis a month later, and in October of 1835, arrived in Rock Island. Rock Island, at the time of his arrival here, was a trading post for the Sac and Fox Indians. There were but ten houses in the village inhabited by white men. In December of 1835, Mr. Hawes returned to St. Louis, overland, accompanied by Mr. Andrews. They followed the old Indian or “Cow” trail. The trip was one filled with hardships. Lost in a blizzard, Mr. Andrews almost succumbed and Mr. Hawes struggled through the storm to the nearest settlement. Mr. Andrews was rescued in the nick of time. In January of 1836, Mr. Hawes returned to Massachusetts from St. Louis, and returned to Illinois, accompanied by his wife, who was Miss Julia M. Babcock, of Ware, Massachusetts, locating at Naples. He engaged in the hotel business at that point for a...

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