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Swift Family of New Bedford, MA

SWIFT. For a hundred years and more the Swift family in and about New Bedford has been one of prominence, wealth. and influence, not only in the several local communities in which its members have resided but out through the Commonwealth and into the nation, where their extensive enterprises have extended. These Acushnet-New Bedford Swifts, a branch of the Cape Cod family, brought to their new field of effort that activity, industry, ability and honesty that had for generations characterized their forefathers and also the line of business that had enriched earlier generations in the old home section – the dealing in live oak timber and its manufacture into water craft, in shipbuilding for not only the United States government, but for those across the water. William Swift, the progenitor of the Swifts under consideration in this article, was at Watertown in the year 1634, and it seems had then been there some time, coming thither from Booking, England. He disposed of his estate in 1637, removed to Sandwich, and there died in January, 1644. His widow Joan, perhaps a second wife, made her will in October, 1662, mentioning therein her son William and his children. His daughter Hannah married Nov. 5, 1642, Daniel Wing. William Swift (2), son of William the settler, was born in England, came to New England and lived in Sandwich, Mass., dying in the year 1705-06. He married a woman whose Christian name was Ruth, and their children were: William, born Aug. 28, 1654, died in 1700-01; he married Elizabeth, and their children were William, Joseph, Benjamin, Thomas, Josiah and Ebenezer. Ephraim, born June...

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed, and records how that success has usually crowned their efforts. It tells also of many, very many, who, not seeking the applause of the world, have pursued “the even tenor of their way,” content to have it said of them, as Christ said of the woman performing a deed of mercy – “They have done what they could.” It tells how that many in the pride and strength of young manhood left the plow and the anvil, the lawyer’s office and the counting-room, left every trade and profession, and at their country’s call went forth valiantly “to do or die,” and how through their efforts the Union was restored and peace once more reigned in the land. In the life of every man and of every woman is a lesson that should not be lost upon those who follow after. Genealogists will appreciate this volume from the fact that it contains so much that would never find its way into public records, and which would otherwise be inaccessible. Great...

Biography of Simon Gulick

Simon Gulick is engaged in farming in Dover Township, where he was born and has always resided. His natal day was August 16, 1856, his parents being Eagleson and Isabelle (Qualset) Gulick. The paternal grandfather was Eagle Gulick, who became a resident of Dover Township and here lived to the age of eighty-two years. His son, Eagleson Gulick, was born in Norway, December 1, 1827, and is still living, being now in the eighty-ninth year of his age. He was married in Rochester to Isabelle Qualset, whose birth occurred in Norway in 1816, and in that country her parents spent their entire lives. It was in 1843 that Eagleson Gulick became a resident of Dover Township and that the County was then but sparsely settled is indicated in the fact that he was able to purchase eighty acres of land at three dollars per acre. He then cleared the land, prepared it for the plow, and in course of time gathered good harvests as a reward for the care and labor which he bestowed upon his fields. In 1848 he built a log house and in that primitive home occurred the birth of his seven children, of whom four are now living: Edward, a resident farmer of Nebraska; Simon; Isabelle, the wife of Henry Mossmann, a railroad man of Missoula, Montana; and Mary the wife of Melvin Bemis, who is connected with a fur store in St. Paul. The mother passed away in 1907, being then ninety years of age. She was a member of the Lutheran church to which Mr. Gulick also belongs. His early political allegiance was...

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