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Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District

Captain McGehee, G. M. D. No. 673, Harrisonville District Allen, James A. Allen, John A. Allen, Matthew Arnold, John Bailey, Jeremiah Bailey, Joseph Bailey, William Baley, James W. Barnes, Micajah R. Beck, Jacob Bird, John Black, Joseph Brooks, Biving Brooks, Julius H. Brown, Robert W. Bruster, Sheriff Bryant, Ransom R. Butt, Frederick A. Cardin, Jesse Cardwell, James Cardwell, John Cawsey, Absalom Cawsey, William Chapman, Berry Clark, John Cobb, Samuel B. Coney, William Cook, Philip Cox, Thomas W. Dewberry, Giles Dewberry, John Duke, John M. Duke, Thomas Duncan, Nathaniel Edwards, Asa Evans, William G. Ford, Bartholomew Ford, Jesse Freel, Howell Fuller, David Furgerson, William Galding, Robert Germany, Augustus B. Germany, John P. Glenn, James, Esq. Goode, James S. Goode, Mackarness Gray, Thomas Greer, Henry Grice, Larry Hallsey, Benjamin L. Harrist, Archibald M. Harrist, Daniel Harrist, John Harrist, Thomas M. Hewston, James Hightower, Arnold Holderfield, John Holsey, Benjamin W. Holt, Thomas S. Horn, Joshua Howell, Philip Hutchins, Littleberry Jennings, Coleman Jennings, James R. Jennings, John Johnson, James F. Johnson, Sankey T. Johnston, Isham Johnston, James Johnston, Lindsey Johnston, Posey Johnston, Samuel A. Jones, Jefferson Justice, William Leath, William C. Lee, Athanatius Looser, John C. Loran, John Lyons, Robert Matthews, Frederick McGehee, William McKnight, William McLain, James Meacham, John Menefee, William Miller, Homer P. M. Mitcham, Hezekiah Mitcham, James Morton, Duke O’Kelly, Stephen O’Neal, Bryan Owen, Jeremiah Pane, Joseph Patterson, John, Sr. Peavy, Hiram P. Peavy, James Peavy, James (2) Peavy, James E. Phillips, Hardy Phillips, Henry J. B. Phillips, James T. Poe, William Pugh, John Reason, Richard A. Richardson, Jacob Richardson, Lucian H. Richardson, Moses Saint John, Thomas B. Scroggins, Sanders...

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Mary F., emp. H. S. & H., h. 16 East Main View the Complete Directory Surnames in the Town of Lakeville Massachusetts You will find the directory of Lakeville Massachusetts starts on page 161. Aldrich, Allen, Anderson, Ashley, Audet, Barnes, Barney, Barton, Bassett, Bennett, Benton, Best, Boman, Briggs, Brown, Bullock, Bump, Bumpus, Burgess, Canedy, Card, Carlin, Caswell, Chace, Clark, Clarke, Cole, Collins, Coombs, Cudworth, Cushman, Davis, Dean, DeMoranville, Dexter, Drake, Dushane, Ellers, Elmer, Elwell, Farmer, Farnham, Ford, Frades, Freeman, Frost, Gerrish, Gifford, Gilman, Gilpatrick, Godfrey, Grady, Griffith, Hackett, Hafford, Hale, Hall, Hammond, Harlow, Harrington, Harvey, Haskell, Haskins, Hayes, Haynes, Hinds, Hinkley, Hoard, Hoffman, Holloway, Horr, Horton, Morton, Howland, Johnson, Jones, Keith, Kelley, Kenney, Kinsley, Lang, Leach, Leonard, Letcher, Lincoln, Loner, Luther, Macomber, Mann, Manning, Marrah, McCulby, McDonald, McGowan, Moody, Morgan, Mosher, Murphy, Nelson, Nickerson, Norris, Orrall, Osborne, Parker, Parkhurst, Parris, Parry, Paun, Peirce, Perry, Phinney, Pickens, Pierce, Pittsley, Plummer, porter, Pratt, Quell, Ramsdell, Reed, Reynolds, Robbins, Robinson, Rogers, Russell, Sampson, Sanford, Sawyer, Scott, Seekell, Sharidan, Shaw, Shockley, Shove,...

I. S. Greer & Company

This establishment is a credit to Burns. Their building, of which we present a cut, was erected in 1892, and is one of the first stone buildings put up in the interior. They carry a large and well assorted stock of shelf and heavy hardware, stoves and tinnier, crockery, glassware, sporting goods, cutlery &c. They are exclusive agents for the Peters Cartridge Co., Queen heating stoves, Born steel ranges, D. M. Osborn & Co.’s farm machinery, Heath & Milligan paints, and other special lines. They have the only tin shop in the interior, doing plumbing, jobbing and repairing. The also carry a full line of undertaker’s supplies, also paints, oils, varnishes, glass, brushes, doors, windows, and builder’s supplies, and have lately bought the Sayer’s saw mill, situated about 15 miles northwest of town, which is the largest and by far the best equipped one in the country. Both members of the firm are progressive businessmen and their maxim has been the satisfaction of all customers, and with that idea in view have built up a clientage that is a credit to...

Slave Narrative of Jenny Greer

Person Interviewed: Jenny Greer Location: Nashville, Tennessee Place of Birth: Florence, Alabama Age: 84 Place of Residence: 706 Overton Street, Nashville, Tennessee “Am 84 y’ars ole en wuz bawn in Florence, Alabama, ’bout seben miles fum town. Wuz bawn on de Collier plantashun en Marster en Missis wuz James en Jeanette Collier. Mah daddy en mammy wuz named Nelson en Jane Collier. I wuz named atter one ob mah Missis’ daughters. Our family wuz neber sold er divided.” “I’se bin ma’ied once. Ma’ied Neeley Greer. Thank de Lawd I aint got no chilluns. Chilluns ez so bad now I can’t stand dem ter save mah life.” “Useter go ter de bap’isin’s en dey would start shoutin’ en singin’ w’en we lef’ de chuch. Went ter deze bap’isin’s in Alabama, Memphis, en ‘yer in Nashville. Lawdy hab mercy, how we useter sing. Only song I members ez ‘De Ole Time ‘ligion.’ I useter go ter camp meetin’s. Eve’rbody had a jolly time, preachin’, shoutin’ en eatin’ good things.” “We didn’t git a thing w’en we wuz freed. W’en dey said we wuz free mah people had ter look out fer demselves.” “Don’ member now ’bout K.K.K. er ‘structshun days. Mah mammy useter tell us a lot ob stories but I’se fergot dem. I’se neber voted en dunno ob any frens bein’ in office.” “No mam, no mam, don’t b’leeve in diff’ent colurs ma’rin. I member one ole sign-‘bad luck ter empty ashes atter dark.'” “I’se hired out wuk’n in white folks house since freedum. I’se a widow now en live ‘yer wid mah neice en mah...

Slave Narrative of Robert Toatley

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Robert Toatley Location: Winnsboro, South Carolina Date of Birth: May 15, 1855 Age: 82 Robert Toatley lives with his daughter, his son, his son’s wife, and their six children, near White Oak, seven miles north of Winnsboro, S.C. Robert owns the four-room frame house and farm containing 235 acres. He has been prosperous up from slavery, until the boll weevil made its appearance on his farm and the depression came on the country at large, in 1929. He has been compelled to mortgage his home but is now coming forward again, having reduced the mortgage to a negligible balance, which he expects to liquidate with the present 1937 crop of cotton. Robert is one of the full blooded Negroes of pure African descent. His face, in repose, possesses a kind of majesty that one would expect in beholding a chief of an African tribe. “I was born on de ‘Lizabeth Mobley place. Us always called it ‘Cedar Shades’. Dere was a half mile of cedars on both sides of de road leading to de fine house dat our white folks lived in. My birthday was May 15, 1855. My mistress was a daughter of Dr. John Glover. My master married her when her was twelve years old. Her first child, Sam, got to be a doctor, and they sho’ did look lak brother and sister. When her oldest child, Sam, come back from college, he fetched a classmate, Jim Carlisle, wid him. I played marbles wid them. Dat boy, Jim, made his mark, got ‘ligion, and went to de top of a college...

Biography of R. D. Greer

It is with pleasure that we. are enabled to grant consideration in this volume of the history of Malheur County to the estimable gentleman whose name is at the head of this article, since he is one who partakes of die real spin of the pioneer and since he is a man of excellent qualities and since he has wrought in this vicinity for the substantial progress and up building of the same for many years. Mr. Greer was born in Ohio, on September 28, 1850, being the son of Guin and Elizabeth Greer. In 1866 he came with his parents to Lancaster County. Nebraska and there he received the completion of his education and gave his attention to farming. He first came to Malheur County in 1875, and then two years later returned to Nebraska, only to come west again in 188o. Settlement was made at Emmett, Idaho, and twelve years he labored there, then removed to Weiser, where he operated in the lumbering industry and then moved to Ontario, and there embarked on the mercantile sea. He continued in a successful business there until 1900, when he sold his interests and came to his present place, one mile southeast from Owyhee post office. He has one quarter section, well irrigated and improved and productive of good dividends annually. Mr. Greer is active in the affairs of the County and has ever been allied on the side of progress and enterprise. The marriage of Mr. Greer and Mrs. Alice L. Conley, a native of Michigan, was solemnized in 1872, at Lincoln, Nebraska, and they have one daughter, Myrtle....

Biography of Capt. Samuel W. Greer

CAPT. SAMUEL W. GREER. Industry, frugality and honesty were the main principles instilled into the lives of their children by the parents of Capt. Samuel W. Greer. Who can doubt but these principles, which have been adopted by Mr. Greer throughout his career, have had much to do with his success? He was born in Rockingham County, N. C., July 28, 1828. The son of John and Mary Jane (Brown) Greer, natives also of the Old North State. The mother died in that State when our subject was but a boy and the father afterward married Miss Parthenia Tuer. In 1849 they moved to Smith County, Tennessee, and from there to Missouri in 1859, locating in Oregon County. There the father died in 1867 when about fifty-nine years of age. He was a very successful farmer and bought the land which Capt. Greer now owns, near Alton. Mr. Greer was a member of the Methodist Church and was a class leader as far back as our subject can remember. He was a Mason, a member of blue lodge, and in politics a Whig at first, and later a Democrat. His father, Truman Greer, was born in Norfolk, Virginia, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. He died in North Carolina. By his first marriage John Greer became the father of eight children, two sons and six daughters, five of whom are now living. There were no children born to the second union that grew to mature years. Capt. Samuel W. Greer was the eldest of the children born to the first union. He spent his school days...

Greer, Amos A. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Amos A. Greer, well known rancher and workman of Willow Springs district, died suddenly of pneumonia Tuesday night, Sept. 19. Mr. Greer had been ill but was supposed to be on the road to recovery when a relapse came and he died in a few hours. The deceased was born in Ohio in 1871 and came to Wallow County nine years ago. He was a member of Wallowa lodge No. 154, IOOF, and that order had charge of the remains to the depot on the way to Moscow, Idaho for interment, funeral being held there Saturday. A widow and six children survive to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father. Enterprise Record Chieftain, Wallowa County, Oregon, Thursday September 28, 1911 Contributed by Charlotte...

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