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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Slave Narrative of Mary Grayson

Person Interviewed: Mary Grayson Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 83 I am what we colored people call a “native.” That means that I didn’t come into the Indian country from somewhere in the Old South, after the war, like so many Negroes did, but I was born here in the old Creek Nation, and my master was a Creek Indian. That was eighty three years ago, so I am told. My mammy belonged to white people back in Alabama when she was born, down in the southern part I think, for she told me that after she was a sizeable girl her white people moved into the eastern part of Alabama where there was a lot of Creeks. Some of them Creeks was mixed up with the whites, and some of the big men in the Creeks who come to talk to her master was almost white, it looked like. “My white folks moved around a lot when I was a little girl”, she told me. When mammy was about 10 or 12 years old some of the Creeks begun to come out to the Territory in little bunches. They wasn’t the ones who was taken out here by the soldiers and contractor men, they come on ahead by themselves and most of them had plenty of money, too. A Creek come to my mammy’s master and bought her to bring out here, but she heard she was being sold and run off into the woods. There was an old clay pit, dug way back into a high bank, where the slaves had been getting clay to mix with hog...

Slave Narrative of Lucinda Davis

Person Interviewed: Davis Lucinda Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 89 “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? Set in de corner wid my lips pooched out! Laway! “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? “What yo’ gwine do when de meat give out? Set in de corner wid my lips pooched out! Laway! Dat’s about de only little nigger song I know, less’n it be de one about: “Great big nigger, laying ‘hind de log- Finger on de trigger and eye on the hawg! Click go de trigger and bang go de gun! Here come de owner and de buck nigger run!” And I think I learn both of dem long after I been grown, ’cause I belong to a full-blood Creek Indian and I didn’t know nothing but Creek talk long after de Civil War. My mistress was part white and knowed English talk, but she never did talk it because none of de people talked it. I heard it sometime, but it sound like whole lot of wild shoat in de cedar brake scared at something when I do hear it. Dat was when I was little girl in time of de war. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA...

Biography of Washington Grayson

Washington Grayson, prominently identified with the tribal government of the Creek Nation and closely associated with many public interests of importance to community and state, makes his home in Eufaula, where he is held in high respect and honor by all who know him. Mr. Grayson was born at Eufaula, Oklahoma, on the 15th of May, 1882, and is a son of George W. and Annie (Stidham) Grayson, both of whom are half-blood Creeks. The former was reared in and near Eufaula and was closely associated with public events in that section of Oklahoma then a part of the Indian Territory. George W. Grayson began his education in the district schools of the Creek Nation and later became a student in the Eufaula Boarding school. He afterward went to Webb City, Missouri, where he attended the Baptist school and at a later period became a student in a business college at Galveston, Texas. He next attended the West Texas Military Academy at San Antonio, Texas, for a period of four years and on completing his course there immediately received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Philippine Constabulary. Going to the Orient he served from August, 1903, until July, 1913, becoming familiar with all of the problems government. At length resigning his position, Mr. Grayson returned to Eufaula and the next two years constituted a period of leisure in his life. He was afterward made official Creek tribal secretary but after America’s entrance into the World war in 1917, he resigned his position and went to the Officers’ Training Camp at Fort Logan H. Roots, near Little Rock, Arkansas....

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