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Biography of Lieutenant William Gaston

William Gaston was born at Newburn, North Carolina, April 5th, 1834. He was the oldest of a family of three children of Alexander and Eliza W. Gaston. Alexander Gaston was a man who exercised marked local influence and was of some political prominence in his state. Among the public duties committed to him was that of representing Hyde County in the State Convention of 1835. Judge William Gaston, father of Alexander Gaston, served as a judge of the Supreme Court of North Carolina. He was also for several years a member of Congress from that state. The Gaston family is an old one in the United States, and several of its members participated in the war for independence. The descendants of the old families are now widely scattered throughout the Union. The family of Alexander and Eliza Gaston, however, is now extinct. Their children were William, Hugh, and Susan. Hugh, the second son, was born in 1836. Early in the war between the states he entered the Confederate army and became a Captain. He was mortally wounded at the battle of Antietam, or Sharpsburg, and died on October 11th, 1862. Susan Gaston married Robert D. Baelieff, and at her death left no descendants. Alexander Gaston, by another marriage, had a daughter named Eliza; a half-sister, therefore, to William, Hugh and Susan. Eliza married S. S. Kirkland and has one son, John Gaston Kirkland, whose home is at Tampa, Florida. William Gaston graduated from the Military Academy at West Point in 1856, at the age of twenty-two. General Hylan B. Lyon, who afterward, as a lieutenant with Colonel Wright, assisted...

Biographical Sketch of William Gaston

Gaston, William; clergyman; born, Columbiana County, O., April 19, 1835; son of James W. and Rebecca Conke Gaston; A. B., Washington College, Pa., 1858; grad. Western Theological Seminary, 1861; (D. D., 1887, LL. D., 1892, Richmond College Ohio); married, Julia M. Cunningham, of Smith’s Ferry, Pa., May 4, 1855 (died March, 1896); second wife, Jennie L. Wise, of Washington, Pa., Aug. 2, 1898; ordained Presbyterian ministry, 1861; pastor, Smith’s Ferry, Pa., 1861-1865; First Church, Bellaire, O., 1865-1880; North Church, Cleveland, 1880-1907; Emeretus, 1907; chaplain U. S. Christian Comma in Civil War, director University of Wooster, O.; Republican; Presbyterian; has traveled in Europe and the...

Biography of L. U. Gaston

L. U. Gaston, Chief of Police of Bartlesville, Washington county, Oklahoma, was born in Neosho, Kansas, October 13, 1873, a son of James Monroe and Laodicea (Smith) Gaston, both of whom were natives of Illinois. His father was a farmer of Kansas and followed that occupation to the time of his death, which occurred in 1877. His wife died in 1895. Mr. Gaston attended the public schools of Neosho county, Kansas, during his early boyhood and when his school days were over he engaged in the livery business, which he followed for a few years. He then removed to St. Louis, Missouri, remaining there until 1908, when he came to Bartlesville, Oklahoma. A short time after his arrival in the latter city he joined the police force as patrolman but resigned from the position two years later. However, in the spring of 1917 he was appointed chief of police and has since held this position, rendering valuable service to the citizens of Bartlesville. He was recently instrumental in suppressing the movies of the Tulsa riot, his action meeting with the approval of the general public. He has a force of eighteen men under him, who are alert and energetic and who are prepared to meet any emergency that might present itself. Mr. Gaston has been married twice. In 1895 at Erie, Kansas, he married Miss Lulu Hudson, and to them was born a daughter, Nellie E., now the wife of R. H. McCullough of Okmulgee. The wife and mother passed away in 1899 and two years later, or in February, 1901, in St. Louis, Missouri, he wedded Miss Katherine...

Biography of Joseph Gaston

JOSEPH GASTON. – Joseph Gaston, the pioneer railroad man of Oregon, was born in Lloydsville, Belmont county, Ohio, in 1833. His ancestors on is father’s side were Huguenots, who were expelled from France by the Roman Catholic King in the sixteenth century, on account of their adhesion to the protestant reformation. They settled first in Ireland, and from thence in 1562 removed to North Carolina, from whence numerous branches of the family scattered out over the United States. William Gaston, the granduncle of Joseph, was chief justice of North Carolina, and for many years member of Congress from that state, and was spoken as one of the great orators of his day. He was also founder of the city of Gaston in the “old North State.” Mr. Gaston’s cousin, William Gaston of Boston, was elected governor of Massachusetts in 1874, being the first Democratic governor of that state in fifty years. His grandfather on is mother’s side was a distinguished soldier of the war of 1812, fighting with Perry in his victory on Lake Erie. His father dying, Joseph was left to the care of relatives, and at the age of fifteen set up in life for himself, working for wages on the farm and in the sawmill. By his own earnings and efforts he procured a common-school education and the means to study law, and was admitted to practice in the supreme court of Ohio in 1856. When the Southern Rebellion broke out in 1860 he raised a company of volunteers, and offered his services to President Lincoln, but was rejected by the examining surgeon for a disease...

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