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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

The Seminole War of 1816 and 1817 – Indian Wars

After the close of the war with Great Britain, in 1815, when the British forces were withdrawn from the Florida’s, Edward Nicholls, formerly a colonel, and James Woodbine, a captain in the British service, who had both been engaged in exciting the Indians and Blacks to hostility, remained in the territory for the purpose of forming combinations against the southwestern frontier of the United States. Nicholls even went so far as to assume the character of a British agent, promising the Creeks the assistance of the British forces if they would rise and assert their claim to the land which had been ceded to the United States. As an aid in effecting their purposes, Nicholls and Woodbine erected a fort on the Appalachicola River, between East and West Florida, as a rendezvous for runaway Blacks and hostile Indians. In July, 1816, upwards of four hundred Blacks and Indians were collected at this place, which was strong by its position, well supplied with ammunition and provisions, and with twelve pieces of artillery. To break up this horde of outlaws, Colonel Clinch, with a detachment of United States troops and five hundred friendly Indians, under the celebrated McIntosh, proceeded from the head waters of the Appalachicola, and laid siege to the fort on the land side. After exacting an oath from their followers not to suffer an American to approach the fort alive, Nicholls and Woodbine left the fort to their keeping. To supply Colonel Clinch’s forces with munitions and provisions for the siege, two schooners, from New Orleans, proceeded up the river on the 10th of July, under convoy of...

Biographical Sketch of Susan Frances Garrett

(See Foreman) Rachel Catherine, daughter of John and Susan Louella (Foreman) Horn, was born June 7, 1860, was educated in the Female Seminary. She married Oct. 21, 1883, Joseph Monroe Garett, who was born Oct. 23, 1859 in Green Co., Ark. He died April 8, 1899. They were the parents of Mattie Bell, born Sept. 27, 1884; Robert Monroe, born February 7, 1886; Frank Pierson, born September 16, 1889; Susan Frances, born July 8, 1891; Eva, born February 13, 1896; and Joseph Bruce Garrett, born March 28, 1899. Miss Susan Frances, whose Cherokee name is Khawk, is a member of the Methodist church. She was educated in the Cherokee Female Seminary, and the Northeastern Oklahoma State Normal School, and has been teaching in the schools of Oklahoma since 1911. The children of Rachel Katherine and Joe M. Garrett are Claude Stephen Garrett, born Aug. 29, 1887, and Henry Edgar Garrett, born Jan. 21,...

Biographical Sketch of R. B. Garrett

(See Grant and Ward) Robert Bruce Garrett, born December 2. 1876 near Baptist Mission, Going Snake District educated in the Cherokee Public Schools and graduated from Male Seminary May 31, 1901. Appointed principal of the Cherokee Orphan Asylum in 1902. Married October 3, 1903, Cherokee Dora Edmondson, born October 23, 1879 in Delaware District, educated in the National Schools and graduated from Female Seminary June 23, 1897. They are the parents of Kathleen Butler Garrett, born January 22. 1906. James Robert Garrett, born June 29, 1850 in Carroll County, Tennessee married March 17, 1875, Elizabeth Greer, born August 30, 1854. He was appointed Clerk of Going Snake District, July 29, 1890 and elected to the same office, August 3, 1891. Mrs. J. R. Garrett died in 1903 and he died in January 1918. They were the parents of Robert Bruce, born Dec. 2, 1876; Simeon, born January 24, 1878 and died Oct. 1902; Mary E. born May 30, 1881; Allie R. born March 3, 1885; Lola born November 29, 1889; Captain J. W. born January 20, 1890 and Thomas B. Garrett, born April 16, 1892. Robert Bruce Garrett’s Cherokee name is Oochalata and that of his wife is Cherokee, They are members of the Methodist church. He is a Mason and Knight of Pythias and she is an Eastern...

Slave Narrative of Alice Douglass

Person Interviewed: Alice Douglass Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Sumner County, Tennessee Date of Birth: December 22, 1860 Age: 73 I was born December 22, 1880 in Summer County, Tennessee. My mother, I mean mammy, ’cause what did we know ’bout mother and mama. Master and Mistress made dey chillun call all nigger women. “Black Harmy.” Jest as I was saying my mammy was named Millie Elkins and my pappy was named Isaac Garrett. My sisters and brothers was Frank, Susie and Mollie. They is all in Nashville, Tennessee right now. They lived in log houses. I ‘member my grandpappy and when he died. I allus slept in the Big House in a cradle wid white babies. We all the time wore cotton dresses and we weaved our own cloth. The boys jest wore shirts. Some wore shoes, and I sho’ did. I kin see ’em now as they measured my feets to git my shoes. We had doctors to wait on us iffen we got sick and ailing. We wore asafedida to keep all diseases offen us. When a nigger man got ready to marry, he go and tell his master that they was a woman on sech and sech a farm that he’d lak to have. Iffen master give his resent, then he go and ask her master and iffen he say yes, well, they jest jump the broomstick. Hens could jest see their wives on Sadday nite. They laid peoples ‘cross barrels and whupped ’em wid bull whups till the blood come. They’d half feed ’em and niggers’d steal food and cook all night....

Biography of Prof. B. R. Garrett

Prof. B. R. Garrett, son-in-law of Dr. Elam, was born in the vicinity of where he now lives April 20, 1858, a son of T. H. and Henrietta (Hinson) Garrett, and grandson of Thomas Garrett, who died in Tennessee a few years ago. T. H. Garrett was born and reared in that State, and in 1852 became a resident of Arkansas, the journey being made by wagon, and from that time until he was killed in 1864 he was engaged in tilling the soil in this county. Being exempt from army service he remained at home and was killed by Union scouts. He was a Democrat, a man of excellent reputation, and acquired considerable property. His widow is still living and makes her home with her children, being now in her seventy-eighth year. She was born in Tennessee, a daughter of George Hinson, of that State, and to her marriage the following children were given: William and Wesley, who were killed during the war while serving in the Fourteenth Arkansas Infantry; Lizzie, wife of Henry A. Fullbright; Parasiada C., wife of John Angle, of Bruno; Nancy A., wife of J. D. Wilson, of Harrison, Arkansas; Jasper N., of Texas; James, of Washington County, Arkansas; Sarah, the deceased wife of Hilary Wilburn; Charity is the widow of Frank Dobbs. and resides in Arkansas; B. R.; and Margaret, wife of Mr. Phillips, of Eros. Prof. Garrett was reared on the farm on which he now lives, was educated in the country schools, the Hindsville, Arkansas, school, the school at Valley Springs, and the State University at Fayetteville, after which he took...

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