Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Ellis Genealogy of Blue Hill, Maine

Jonathan Ellis was born in Bellingham June, 1774, married Susannah Parker, Sept. 11, 1795, daughter of Peter Parker, Sr.; she was born June 27, 1772; died August 17, 1803; her husband died Dec. 23, 1806. Children were: Jonathan, Charles, Almira and Amos.

Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Burrell’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Burrell’s Company of Infantry in Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous Augusta, Maine, to the nineteenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

Elnathan Todd of Long Ridge CT

Elnathan Todd7, (Elnathan6, John5, John4, John3, John2, Christopher1) born Oct. 15, 1812, died Feb. 19, 1897, married Oct. 29, 1855, Henrietta C., daughter of Samuel Crane, whose family and ancestors had controlled large grants of land in Bedford, New York, descendants of John Crane who came from England in early colonial times. She was often urged to try to secure her supposed rights in the Jennings estate of England. She was born April 13, 1825, died Feb. 7, 1895. Mr. Todd was born in Pound Ridge, which is a short distance north of Long Ridge, both communities being included in the town of Stamford, Conn. He finally settled in Long Ridge. He and his cousin, Frederick Schofield, owned the only store for miles around. They also, established a shoe business there, and when it had expanded to large proportions, they sold the factory which they had occupied, to Seth Smith Cook and Charles H. Lounsbury. Their business prospered and thrived for a number of years. Distance from the railroad caused them to move to Stamford, having sold the business at Long Ridge, to John E. Todd, son of Elnathan, one of the founders. Children: 1136. John Everett Todd, born June 19, 1857, in Long Ridge, Stamford, Conn., died Jan. 11, 1908, married Oct. 19, 1887, Sally Gardner. Mr. Todd bought and managed the shoe manufacturing business in Long Ridge, which he purchased of his father and partner, for a short time, when he too, went to Stamford. This removal was a severe loss to the village. Child: 1847. Ruth Gardiner, b. Oct. 13, 1888, in Long Ridge, Stamford, Conn.,...

Victims of the Fugitive Slave Law – Fugitive Slave Law

The remainder of this Tract will be devoted to a record, as complete as circumstances enable us to make, of the Victims Of The Fugitive Slave Law. It is a terrible record, which the people of this country should never allow to sleep in oblivion, until the disgraceful and bloody system of Slavery is swept from our land, and with it, all Compromise Bills, all Constitutional Guarantees to Slavery, all Fugitive Slave Laws. The established and accredited newspapers of the day, without reference to party distinctions, are the authorities relied upon in making up this record, and the dates being given with each case, the reader is enabled to verify the same, and the few particulars which the compass of the Tract allows to be given with each. With all the effort which has been made to secure a good degree of completeness and exactness, the present record must of necessity be an imperfect one, and fall short of exhibiting all the enormities of the Act in question. James Hamlet, of New York, September, 1850, was the first victim. He was surrendered by United States Commissioner Gardiner to the agent of one Mary Brown, of Baltimore, who claimed him as her slave. He was taken to Baltimore. An effort was immediately made to purchase his freedom, and in the existing state of the public feeling, the sum demanded by his mistress, $800, was quickly raised. Hamlet was brought back to New York with great rejoicings. Near Bedford, Penn., October 1. Ten fugitives, from Virginia, were attacked in Pennsylvania—, one mortally wounded, another dangerously. Next morning, both were captured. Five...

Biographical Sketch of Alex Gardiner

Alex Gardiner general farmer and fruit-raiser near Fullerton, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1838, the fourth son of William and Mary Gardiner, who came to America in 1855, in a sailing vessel, landing in New York; thence they immediately sailed to Charleston, South Carolina, and thence they proceeded to Knoxville, Tennessee, locating ten miles south of Knoxville at Rockford. William Gardiner was a cotton spinner by trade. The subject of this sketch served five years as a machinist in Scotland, leaving school at the age of twelve years. In 1869 he came overland to California, starting from Knoxville, Tennessee, September 21, 1869, and arrived at Watsonville, this State, October 6. He hunted along the coast for a home, and December 6 found him in Los Angeles. Directly he purchased 160 acres two miles and a half northwest of Anaheim, where he has since resided; was one of the first settlers there, buying of the Los Angeles and San Bernardino Land Company. Out of a barren waste he has made a fruitful farm, and as a general agriculturist and horticulturist he has been successful. Mrs. Gardiner, whose maiden name was Susan M. Reeder, was born in Blount County, Tennessee, and her parents, Majors and Jane (Williams) Reader, were natives of Virginia and had ten children. Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner were married in East Tennessee in 1864. Their children are: Jennie, wife of Otto des Granges, Jr.; Mary, Frank, John. James, Lilburn and Alex....

Biography of Dr. J. S. Gardiner

Dr. J. S. Gardiner, Postmaster at Anaheim, was born in Maryville, Tennessee, in 1841. His ancestors were from Scotland formerly. He received his literary education at the common schools of his native county. In 1861 he entered the University of Pennsylvania, and continued there during one term. Then the war coming on in 1862, he entered the Confederate army. He enlisted April 13, 1862, in Company I, Thirty-seventh Tennessee State Volunteer Infantry, and served until September 4, 1864, when he was discharged on account of disability. He then re-entered the University and was graduated with the degree of M. D., in 1865. In the fall of this year he began the practice of medicine in Blount County, Tennessee, and continued there until September 1, 1869, when he set out for California, and soon after his arrival here he, with his brother, bought 160 acres of land near Anaheim. In 1870 he began the practice of his profession and continued at it until 1885, when he was appointed Postmaster, which position he holds at this time. October 31, 1876, he was married to Mrs. M. J. Tarver, a native of Alabama, but principally reared in Texas. She was the widow of Charles Tarver, who, at one time was district attorney for Bastrop County, Texas. She and her husband crossed the plains in wagons in 1868. By her first husband she had one daughter, Charles Louise, now the wife of Victor Montgomery, a prominent attorney at Santa Ana. Her union with Dr. Gardiner has been blessed with two daughters, Mary and Jessie, the latter of whom died at the age of...

Biographical Sketch of Jacob Janse Gardiner

Jacob Janse Gardinier, also Flooder, was the progenitor of Gardiner and Gardner families, or the greater part of them, in 1790. In 1790 the heads of families of these surnames, included in Columbia county, Dirck. Peter A., Peter H., Peter J., Samuel H.. Andrew, Gideon, Godrey, James, Labon and John. Jacob J. was at Beverwyck as early as 1638 and came from Holland. In 1656 he owned land on the north side of Wall street from William to Pearl street, New Amsterdam, and he divided this tract into house lots and sold them through his agent, Sander Leendertse Glen. He bought land early in Kinderhook together with Goyer’s Kill opposite or near Apje’s Island and his immediate descendants settled very generally in this section. Three families of descendants were in Kinderhook in 1790, Dirck, Peter A. and Godfrey bung the fathers. Jacob J. married (first) Jospyna who died February 16. 1664; (second) Barentje Stratsmans, widow of Hans Coenraatse. In 1688 she was again a widow, having then living ten children by her first husband and five by the second. Children of Jacob J. Gardinier: Jan; Samuel; Andrew; Hendrick; Albert; Aeltje, married Adam Dingman. Benjamin Gardner was a farmer in Columbia county and is believed to have been of this...

Pin It on Pinterest