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Peace Attempts with Western Prairie Indians, 1833

What was known as the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into in Mississippi with the Choctaw Indians September 27, 1830;1 pursuant to the terms of the treaty, in 1832 the movement of the Choctaw to their new home between the Canadian and Red rivers was under way but they were in danger from incursions of the Comanche and Pani Picts2 or Wichita, and the Kiowa tribe, who came east as far as the Washita and Blue rivers; these Indians had also evinced a hostile attitude toward white citizens and had attacked and plundered Santa Fe traders, trappers, and other unprotected travelers. A party of twelve traders had left Santa Fe in December, 1832, under Judge Carr of Saint Louis for their homes in Missouri. Their baggage and about ten thousand dollars in specie were packed upon mules. They were descending the Canadian River when, near the present town of Lathrop in the Panhandle of Texas, they were attacked by an overwhelming force of Comanche and Kiowa Indians. Two of the men, one named Pratt, and the other Mitchell, were killed; and after a siege of thirty-six hours the survivors made their escape at night on foot, leaving all their property in possession of the Indians. The party became separated and after incredible hardship and suffering five of them made their way to the Creek settlements on the Arkansas and to Fort Gibson where they found succor. Of the other five only two survived. The money secured by the Indians was the first they had ever seen.3 Colonel Arbuckle on May 6, ordered4 a military force to Red...

Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors.1 French Influence in Arkansas One of the first of the French traders up the Arkansas whose name has been recorded was Joseph Bogy, an early resident of the old French town, Arkansas Post, from which point he traded with the Osage Indians in the vicinity of the Three Forks. On one of his expeditions he had ascended the Arkansas with a boatload of merchandise, to trade to the Osage near the mouth of the Verdigris. There on the seventh of January, 1807, he was attacked and robbed of all his goods by a large band of Choctaw Indians under the famous chief, Pushmataha.2 When charged with the offense, Pushmataha admitted it and justified the robbery on the ground that they were at war with the Osage, against whom they were proceeding at the time; and that as Bogy was trading with their enemies, he was a proper subject for reprisal. Bogy laid a claim before the Government for nine thousand dollars damages against the Choctaw, based on the protection guaranteed by his trader’s license. This claim was pending until after 1835, before it was allowed. Among the interesting papers in connection with the claim, is Bogy’s report of having met on...

Expeditions of Fowler and James to Santa Fe, 1821

When Pike returned from his western expedition and related his experiences in Santa Fe and other places among the Spaniards, his accounts excited great interest in the east, which resulted in further exploits. In 1812, an expedition was undertaken1 by Robert McKnight, James Baird, Samuel Chambers, Peter Baum, Benjamin Shrive, Alfred Allen, Michael McDonald, William Mines, and Thomas Cook, all citizens of Missouri Territory; they were arrested by the Spaniards, charged with being in Spanish territory without a passport, and thrown into the calabazos of Chihuahua, where they were kept for nine years. In 1821, two of them escaped, and coming down Canadian and Arkansas rivers met Hugh Glenn, owner of a trading house at the mouth of the Verdigris, and told him of the wonders of Santa Fe. Inspired by the accounts of these travelers, Glenn engaged in an enterprise with Major Jacob Fowler and Captain Pryor for an expedition from the Verdigris to Santa Fe.2 The members of the McKnight party who had escaped from the Spaniards, continued their journey to Saint Louis, where they repeated their romantic tale to John McKnight, a brother of Robert McKnight who was still a prisoner with the Spaniards, and to others. As a result of their account, McKnight and General Thomas James organized an expedition to go from Saint Louis to Santa Fe. James’s purpose was to trade with the Indians, and John McKnight went to see his brother and procure his release, if possible. The two expeditions got under way the same summer, and both went by way of the Arkansas as high as the Verdigris, which at that...

Dawson Family Genealogy

The Dawson Family Genealogy is a large compilation of numerous Dawson genealogies in the United States deriving from a variety of different immigrant ancestors. For Dawson descendants it remains the go-to resource.

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Viola Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allen, Charles F. Wf. Libbie; ch. Ray and Fred. P. O. Gray, R. 1. O. 468.64 ac., sec. 7. (40.) Allen, R. L. Wf. Laura. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160ac., sec. 7. (20.) Owner, Chas. F. Allen. Anderson, Charles. Ch. Jennie, Fred, Frank and John. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. O. 298.41 ac., sec. 1;O. 40 ac., sec. 12. (27.) Anderson, D. B. Wf. Lillie; ch. Bessie, Nellie, Alice, Mary and Hope. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. O. 320 ac., sec. 34. (46.) Bamsey, G. C. Wf. Phoebe; ch. Russell, Ralph, Lewis and Arlene. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 30; O. 80 ac., sec. 29. (30.) Beck, C. M. Wf. Mary; ch. Carl, Harry and Hans. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 159 ac., sec. 22. (28.) Bonney, John J. Wf. Francis; ch. John and Harold. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 2; R. 80 ac., sec. 11. (3.) Breeder of Duroc Jersey Hogs. Owner, J. C. Bonwell. Bonwell, John C. Ch. Pauline, Gertrude and Leora. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 480 ac., sec. 28; O. 80 ac., sec. 27; O. 160 ac., sec. 1; O. 80 ac., sec. 12; O. 80 ac., sec. 2; O. 80 ac., sec. 11. (46.)Breeder of Polled Hereford Cattle. “Viola Center Farm.” Boyer, H. C. Wf. Grace; ch. Jimmie and Joseph. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. R. 160 ac., sec. 35. (29.) Owner, Elizabeth A. Hinkson. Brannan, James H. Wf. Ellen; ch....

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Melville Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Anderson, L. A. Wf. Mathilda; ch.Emmert and Lucile. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 36. (18.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs. Andresen, Christ. Wf. Hansena; ch. Mary, Nina, Emil, Estra, Hu1ga and Hannah. P. O. Audubon,R. 3. R. 240 ac., sec. 26. (22.) Owner, H. M. McClanahan. Andrews, James. Wf. Allie; ch. Lois and Harvey. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 28. (37.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs and Holstein Cattle. Arts, John N. Wf. Dorothy; ch. Nora L. P. O.Audubon, R. 3. O. 120 ac., sec. 22. (20.) Beurns, James. Wf. Ida; ch. Minnie, John, Albert, Monroe, Bessie, Labelle, Lottie and McKinley. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 24. (45.) Owner, Annis Weighton. Black, Benjamin. Wf. Mattie; ch. Wayne, Everett, Lucile and Therm. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 80 ac., sec. 24. (33.) Blake, J. R. P. O. Guthrie Center. R. 160 ac., sec. 36. (3.) Owner, Almira Blake. Blohm, F. E. Wf. Ruth. P. O. Hamlin, R. 1. R. 120 ac., sec. 32; R. 40 ac., sec. 31. (27.) Owner, E. F. Bilharz. Brown, A. W. Wf. Lennie; ch. Virginia and Dorothy. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. Store in sec. 13. (15.) Buckner, C. E. We. Kathrine; ch. George and Lewis. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. O. 120 ac., sec. 9;O. 40 ac., sec. 4. (35.) Burris, W. M. Wf. Lena. P. O. Audubon, R. 3.R. 80 ac., sec. 14. (25.) Bylund, Axel. Wf. Vendla; ch. Edna and...

Biography of Hon. John Shaw Dawson

On the roll of men who have been prominently identified with the civie affairs of the State of Kansas during the past two decades, the name of Hon. John Shaw Dawson occupies a leading and conspienous place. When he came to this state, in 1887, it was as a country school teacher, but he possessed the ambition and ability necessary to carry him to high position, and it was not long are he became connected with public matters, and, being admitted to the bar in 1898, rose rapidly in his profession and in public confidence. After serving in various positions of trust, in 1914 he was elevated to the bench of the Supreme Court, where he still remains as an associate justice. Judge Dawson was born at Grantown-on-Spey, Scotland, June 10, 1869, a son of James J. and Annie (Shaw) Dawson. His father spent the greater part of his life in railroad work in Great Britain, but in his later years followed merchandising in Scotland and held the position of postmaster in the village where he yet resides. John Shaw Dawson was primarily educated in the public schools, later attanding the Robert Gorden’s College, at Aberdeen, an institution of wide repute as a superior technical school. It was his father’s desire that he should enter the ministry for his life work, but, meeting with opposition from the prospective dominie, he was “permitted” to go to the wilds (as the father supposed) of Illinois, in the United States, where he had many relatives residing. Instead of sickening the boy of the hardships of frontier life and probably making him more...

Slave Narrative of Anthony Dawson

Person Interviewed: Anthony Dawson Location: 1008 E. Owen St., Tulsa, Oklahoma Age: 105 “Run nigger, run, De Patteroll git you! Run nigger, run, De Patteroll come! “Watch nigger, Watch- De Patteroll trick you! Watch nigger, watch, He got a big gun!” Dat one of the songs de slaves all knowed, and de children down on de “twenty acres” used to sing it when dey playing in de moonlight ’round de cabins in de quarters. Sometime I wonder iffen de white folks didn’t make dat song up so us niggers would keep in line. None of my old Master’s boys tried to git away ‘cepting two. and dey met up wid evil, both of ’em. One of dem niggers was fotching a bull-tongue from a piece of new ground way at de back of de plantation, and bringing it to my pappy to git it sharped. My pappy was de blacksmith. Dis boy got out in de big road to walk in de soft send, and long come a wagon wid a white overseer and five, six, niggers going somewhar, Dey stopped and told dat boy to git in and ride. Dat was de last anybody seem him. Dat overseer and another one was cotched after awhile, and showed up to be underground railroaders. Dey would take a bunch of niggers into town for some excuse, and on de way jest pick up a extra nigger and show him whar to go to git on de “railroad system.” When de runaway niggers got to de North dey had to go in de army, and dat boy from our place got...

Biographical Sketch of Robert H. Dawson

Dawson, Robert H.; lawyer; born, Pontiac, Mich., March 28, 1882; son of John W. and Jean Hamilton Dawson; educated, University of Michigan, A. B., 1903, and Western Reserve University, 1909, LL. B.; married, Pueblo, Colo., Sept. 14, 1910, Miss Luna Cooper; member Phi Delta Phi Fraternity. Recreations: Baseball and...
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