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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the table below you can find the name of those whom biographies can be found and click on the page number – it will take you directly to their biography. If you wish to access the history portion of the manuscript then it is contained in volumes 1-2, volume 3 being devoted entirely to biographies. Gallery of Western Nebraska’s People 143 full page photographs of families, couples, group photographs, individual people, and homesteads found within the manuscript History of Western Nebraska & It’s People, Volume 3. Volume 1 – History of Western Nebraska Volume 2 – History of Western Nebraska Biographies of Western Nebraska – Volume 3 SurnameGivePageNotes BusheeBerton Kenyon5 GentryBenjamin F.6 DownerAmon R.7 KirkhamValle B.7 LammWilliam H.8 NeeleyRobert G.8 HamptonRodolphus M.9 HardingWilliam Henry11 WesterveltJames P.11 GrimmJoseph L.12 McHenryMatthew H.12 RaymondLewis L.13 LymanWilliam H.14 SimmonsRobert G.14 DenslowLloyd15 PeckhamJohn S.16 PeckhamGeorge B.16 AndersonVictor17M.D. FrenchWilliam F.17 DavisEvan G.18 HanksRobert M.18 LammWilliam19Sr. ProhsOtto J.19 JonesHoward O.20D.D.S. MillerRobert G.20 AtkinsAuburn W.21 BrownWilliam G.22D.D.S. IrelandTed L.22 HamiltonLuther F.23 YoungFrank B.23M. D. ScottFremont24 MaginnisPatrick25 FaughtArthur M.27M....

History of the Methodist Church at Norwich Vermont

Prior to the year 1800, Methodism had scarcely gained a foothold in Vermont. The first Methodist society in the State is said to have been formed at Vershire by Nicholas Suethen in 1796. Two years later, only one hundred church members were returned as residents in the Vershire Circuit, then including the whole of eastern Vermont. Zadock Thompson, in the first edition of his Gazetteer of Vermont, published in 1824, gives the number of preachers, traveling and local, at that time as about one hundred, and the number of societies much greater. Probably no religious body ever made so rapid a growth in the state or the country as did the Methodists during the first twenty-five years of the nineteenth century. Although largely outnumbering every other at the present time, its later rate of increase is comparatively slow. We have no information that fixes the time at which Methodist meetings began to be held in Norwich. The earliest preaching was by circuit preachers, and of these Eleazer Wells and Nathaniel Stearns were among the first. Both of these men had the certificates of their ordination to the ministry (as early as 1810 or 1811) by Bishop McKendree entered upon the town records, and both doubtless labored here more or less about that time. Rev. Amasa Taylor was also here some part of the time about 1813. About 1815, the first church building was erected by the Methodists, a wooden structure of modest dimensions, which stood near the forks of the highway leading from Union Village to Norwich Plain, and about two miles south of the former place. Some members...

Biography of George W. Dailey

Few men can recite the story of Kansas since statehood from their own recollection. One of these men is George W. Dailey, now a resident of Topeka. Mr. Dailey is a true pioneer of Kansas. He arrived when this and all the country west of the Missouri River was a wilderness. He bore the hardships and difficult circumstances of the frontier settler. He helped defend the country when there was danger, and a public spirit and willingness to sacrifice himself for the benefit of others had been one of the distinguishing traits of his character. In March, 1860, he arrived in Topeka on horseback, he having traveled that way from Marshall, Missouri. He went direct from Topeka to Mission Creek, now called Dover, and with his cousin Charles W. Dailey acquired 800 acres of land in Wabannses county, just across the Shawnee County line. Thus he entered upon his life in Kansas on a comparatively large scale even for those days. After two years on that land he moved to Mission Creek and bought the Doty farm, now known generally as the Dailey farm. On March 7, 1862, Mr. Dailey married Eliza J. Doty. For a quarter of a century Mr. Dailey found all his time and energies absorbed in the management of his extensive farming and stock raising interests in the vicinity of Dover. In 1885 he moved to Topeka, and that city had since been his home, though his interests are still represented in the country districts of Shawnee County. George W. Dailey was born April 6, 1835, in Monroe County, New York, and grew up and...

Dailey, Letha – Obituary

Word has been received of the death of Letha E. Dailey in a Portland hospital. She was born April 28, 1898 in Paradise, Oregon and passed away Sept. 3rd, 1967. She is survived by one brother, Donald Applegate, of Tillamook, Oregon; one sister, Mrs. Vadna Kuhn of La Grande; one son, Billy W. Dailey of Eugene, Oregon; one daughter, Mrs. Joan Alber of Portland, Oregon; five grandchildren and one great-grandson. Mrs. Dailey will be remembered as Letha Applegate in Wallowa County where she spent her early years. Source: Wallowa County Chieftain, Wallowa County, Oregon, September 1967 Contributed by: Sue...

Biographical Sketch of George A. Dailey

Is a native of Kentucky, born in 1844. He pitched his tent’ in the “lone star” state in the year 1857, a lad of thirteen years. He went into the mercantile business with a capital of $3000.00, in 1866, when about 21 years of age. His business was that of general merchandise, which he followed for two years, when he opened a drug store at Honey Grove, and has remained in that town conducting a large drug store, ever since. He does a gross annual business amounting to $18,000.00 or $20,000.00. Mr. Dailey is a fine businessman, a good pharmacist, pleasing and entertaining in his address and manner, and possesses a full store of knowledge and general information, as well as of drugs, books and jewelry. He is one of the stake and stay of Honey Grove, a Tree mason, a knight of honor, and member of other secret and benevolent orders, treasurer of the Honey grove Building and Loan Association, and Vice President of the Walcott Institute. Mr. Dailey is a young looking man for his age, and his usefulness as a citizen is not likely to be cut off...

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