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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Biography of Abel Curtis

In the abundance of able men that adorned the first twenty-five years of the history of the town, there is no more brilliant name than that of Abel Curtis. He was a son of Simeon Curtis and came with his father from Lebanon, Conn., where he was born June 13, 1755. The son graduated from Dartmouth College in the class of 1776, being the first graduate from this town, one year earlier than the Rev. Asa Burton. Abel Curtis is first mentioned in connection with town affairs in November, 1778, when he was chosen delegate to the Cornish convention of December following, in company with Peter Olcott and Nathaniel Brown. From this time until his death in 1783, a period full of important events shaping the future of state and country, he was prominent in all the transactions of the town, representative for three years in the legislature; serving on many committees; delegate to Congress in 1782, with Ira Allen and Jonas Fay; assistant judge of the county court in 1782; delegate to the Charlestown convention of January, 1781, sitting at Windsor, by the joint action of which with the legislature of Vermont, the second union of New Hampshire towns was effected on the 22nd of February, following; delegate to the Thetford convention of June 1782, by which he was commissioned agent of the towns of Hartford, Norwich, Bradford, and Newbury to carry to the Government of New Hampshire a memorial, drawn up by himself, proposing to place said towns under the jurisdiction of that state, in certain contingencies. The last public service he performed for the state was...

Norwich Vermont in the Revolutionary War

The sources of information in regard to the part taken by the town in the Revolutionary struggle are few and scanty. The earliest allusion in the town records to this important epoch of the country’s history is found in the election of a Committee of Safety at the annual town meeting, March 11, 1777. This committee was five in number: Deacon Joseph Smalley, Samuel Hutchinson, John Hatch, Captain Hezekiah Johnson and John Hopson. There is much reason to believe, however, that this was not the first Committee of Safety that acted for the town; but was a new committee selected to conform to a recommendation made to the towns in Cumberland and Gloucester Counties by the Convention at Westminster which declared the independence of Vermont the preceding January.1 It is pretty certain that a company of militia was organized in Norwich as early as the year 1774 or 1775. Of this company Peter Olcott was chosen Captain and Thomas Murdock, Ensign, doubtless by the votes of the men enrolled in the same. The company was probably a purely voluntary organization of patriotic young men, in Colonel Seth Warner‘s regiment of Rangers in 1775, in the continental service. Colonel Timothy Bedell, of Haverhill, N. H., also raised a regiment the same year for service in Canada. Fresh regiments were enlisted early in the spring of 1776, by both Colonel Bedell and Colonel Warner. Again on the 7th of March Colonel Morey writes to the New Hampshire Committee of Safety: “Some recruiting officers from Colonel Warner‘s party [regiment] have enlisted a considerable number of fine men, they had the money to...

Biographical Sketch of J. Milton Curtiss

Curtiss, J. Milton; pres. The Curtiss-Ambler Realty Co.; born, Harrisville, Medina County, O., Feb. 26, 1840; educated in the district and city schools, Brooklyn Academy and Cleveland Institute, University Heights, now Lincoln Heights; taught district school one year; engaged in the nursery business for twenty years, helped to organize and was one of the first trustees of Brooklyn village; moved to Cleveland in 1868; member City Council, 1876 to 1883; appointed Park Commissioner by Mayor Herrick; served two years; for five years supt. Riverside Cemetery; pres. Riverside Cemetery...

Maria Irene Todd Curtiss of New York

CURTISS, Maria Irene Todd8, (Zerah7, Jehiel6, Stephen5, Stephen4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born June 8, 1831, in Toddsville, N. Y., married at Oriskany Falls, N. Y., Oct. 14, 1851, Samuel Curtiss, who was born Dec. 15, 1824, died Oct. 31, 1870. He was in government employ as master mechanic, building piers in Oswego, N. Y. harbor. One day the government inspector appeared during a heavy wind and wished to examine the piers which were being constructed. So three men started out in a small boat, to see what effect the waves had upon the piers under the light-house. The wind was blowing a perfect gale at the time and the boat became unmanageable and drifted into the breakers between the piers, capsized and Samuel Curtiss was drowned. Children: I. Ada Rosetta, b. Feb. 6, 1854, d. March 12, 1912. II. Julia Almira, b. March 16, 1856, d. 1898. III. William Marvin, b. April 24,...

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