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Ancestors of William P. Whitman of Brockton, MA

WILLIAM P. WHITMAN, president and treasurer of the well-known shoe manufacturing concern of the Whitman & Keith Company, of Brockton, and one of that city’s successful and progressive business men, as was his father before him, is a descendant of distinguished and historic New England ancestry. Mr. Whitman is a direct descendant of John Alden and Priscilla Mullins, of the “Mayflower,” 1620; of Rev. James Keith, the first ordained minister of Bridgewater; and of John Whitman, who settled in Weymouth, Mass., as early as 1638, from whom descended many persons eminent in professional life and otherwise, among them Dr. Marcus Whitman, who saved the vast territory of Oregon to the United States; Hon. Ezekiel Whitman, for many years chief justice of the Superior and Supreme courts of the State of Maine; and Hon. William E. Russell, twice governor of Massachusetts.

Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

Pierce Family of North Bridgewater, MA

The Pierce families of this country are and have long been very numerous. Early in the settlement of New England came representatives from England, most of them not related, so far as now known. Among them were Abraham, of Plymouth, 1623, who became one of the original purchasers of Bridgewater in 1645; Daniel, of Newbury, blacksmith, who came from Ipswich, County of Suffolk, in 1634, aged twenty-three years; John, of Dorchester, mariner from Stepney, Middlesex, before 1631; another John, of Dorchester and Boston; John, of Watertown, 1638; Capt. Michael, of Hingham and Scituate; Richard, of Portsmouth, R. I.; Robert, of Dorchester; Thomas, of Charlestown, who was admitted to the church there in 1634; and Capt. William, of Boston, who was a distinguished shipmaster of his time.

Miller Family of Middleboro MA

ABISHAI MILLER, than whom no man connected with the iron industry in New England stood higher in reputation for skill and efficiency in workmanship, and at the time of his death, Jan. 30, 1883, president of the Atlantic Works, which he had helped to organize and in the prosperity of which he had long been a vital factor, was born June 22, 1809, in Fall Brook, Middleboro, Mass., son of John and Susanna (Sparrow) Miller, and a member of a family which located in that town in the seventeenth century. John Miller, a native of England, born in 1624, was a member of the Grand Inquest at Middleboro in 1672. He was among the proprietors of the Twenty-six Men’s Purchase (1661-62) at their meeting in 1677. Previous to April 29, 1678, he bought a house lot of Edward Gray. He was the owner of lot No. 154 in the South Purchase (1673), and was one of the owners of the Sixteen Shilling Purchase (1675). Mr. Miller lived on Thompson street not far from the brook near the house of the late Elijah Shaw, in Middleboro. He died May 11, 1720, in the ninety-seventh year of his age. His monument stands in the cemetery at “The ‘ Green,” where rest the remains of six or more generations of his descendants. The Christian name of the wife of Mr. Miller was Mercy, and their children were: John, Mary and Elizabeth. John Miller (2), son of John, born in 1669, married Feb. 12, 1701-02, Lydia Coombs, born in 1678, daughter of Francis and Deborah (Morton) Coombs. He lived in Middleboro, and there...

Copeland Family of Easton, MA

COPELAND (Whitman family). The family bearing this name is one of long and honorable standing in southeastern Massachusetts. Early at Braintree, then at Bridgewater, and for generations in the town of Easton, this Easton-Whitman branch of the earlier Braintree stock has for several generations been one of Easton’s leading families, and more recently – a later generation – in the new town of Whitman, formerly South Abington. Reference is made to the forefathers of the present George Copeland and Horatio Franklin Copeland, M. D., brothers. The latter though of Easton birth has been for nearly half a century active and prominent in the professional and social life of what is now Whitman. Himself a veteran of the Civil war, the Doctor is a representative of patriotic ancestry, his father being a soldier of the war of 1812 and his great-grandfather of the Revolution, and he, too, is representative of the Pilgrim Fathers, descending in direct line from John Alden and Priscilla Mullins, of the “Mayflower.” There follows in chronological order from his first paternal American ancestor Dr. Copeland’s lineage. Lawrence Copeland is of record at Braintree as early as 1651, Dec. 12th of which year he married Lydia Townsend. His death occurred Dec. 30, 1699, when, according to the gravestone, he was aged an hundred years. His widow Lydia died Jan. 8, 1688. Their children were: Thomas, born May 10, 1652; Thomas (2), born in 1654 or 1655; William, born Nov. 15, 1656; John, born Feb. 10, 1659; Lydia, born May 31, 1661; Ephraim, born Jan. 17, 1665; Hannah, born Feb. 25, 1668; Richard, born July 11, 1672; and...

Descendants of Frederick Packard of Brockton, MA

FREDERICK PACKARD, late of Brockton, was not only one of the best known men in the line of shoe manufacturing in that city but also one of its most honorable and respected citizens. He ranked among the city’s most successful business men, one whose start in life was obtained by his energy and push, and these traits, combined with excellent business acumen, had long secured for him a position of affluence, and caused the firm of which he had so long been the head to become one of the best known in its line in the country. Mr. Packard was born Dec. 11, 1836, in North Bridgewater (now Brockton), son of the late Josiah and Betsey D. (Bolton) Packard, and was descended from old and sturdy New England ancestry. The following history of his branch of the Packard family is given in chronological order from the American progenitor. Samuel Packard came from Windham, near Hingham, England, with his wife and child in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, in 1638, John Martin, master, there being 133 passengers on board. Samuel Packard settled first in Hingham, Mass., where he was a proprietor in 1638. Later he removed to the West parish of Bridgewater, where the first interior settlement in the State was made. He was constable in 1644, and licensed to keep a tavern in 1670. His will was probated March 3, 1684-85, from which it appears that the Christian name of his wife was Elizabeth. His children were: Elizabeth, Samuel, Jr., Zaccheus, Thomas, John, Nathaniel, Mary, Hannah, Israel, Jael, Deborah and Deliverance. Zaccheus Packard, son of Samuel, married Sarah Howard,...

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Descendants of Charles Howard, North Bridgewater, MA

CHARLES HOWARD, founder and president of the Howard & Poster Company, one of the largest and best known shoe manufacturing concerns in this Commonwealth, and an original promoter of the Brockton Agricultural Society, of which he is also president, is one of the foremost business men and citizens of Brockton, Plymouth Co., Mass., for over forty years continuously and prominently identified with the industrial and financial growth of that city. Mr. Howard was born Jan. 9, 1837, in North Bridgewater, now Brockton, eldest son of the late Charles and Lavina (Rounds) Howard, and a descendant of several of New England’s earliest settled families. The Howard family is one of long and honorable standing in this Commonwealth, the name being variously spelled Haywood, Hayward and Howard, and these forms are often confounded, by many being pronounced alike. They seem to have been the same name originally, although for several generations many bearing the name have adopted the spelling Howard. The genealogy of the family here under consideration follows, the generations being given in chronological order from the first American ancestor of this branch of the family. (I) William Hayward or Haywood was an early inhabitant of Charlestown, Mass., where he was a proprietor in 1637. He removed to Braintree, where he was deputy in 1641, and bought land in 1648. He signed his name “William Haywood” as witness to a deed of James Everill in 1654. He was drowned the 10th day of the 3d month, 1659. Administration was granted the 14th of June, 1659, to his widow Margery for herself and children. The widow died the 18th of the...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

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