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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Viola Iowa

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Allen, Charles F. Wf. Libbie; ch. Ray and Fred. P. O. Gray, R. 1. O. 468.64 ac., sec. 7. (40.) Allen, R. L. Wf. Laura. P. O. Gray, R. 1. R. 160ac., sec. 7. (20.) Owner, Chas. F. Allen. Anderson, Charles. Ch. Jennie, Fred, Frank and John. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. O. 298.41 ac., sec. 1;O. 40 ac., sec. 12. (27.) Anderson, D. B. Wf. Lillie; ch. Bessie, Nellie, Alice, Mary and Hope. P. O. Audubon, R. 2. O. 320 ac., sec. 34. (46.) Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now Bamsey, G. C. Wf. Phoebe; ch. Russell, Ralph, Lewis and Arlene. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 80 ac., sec. 30; O. 80 ac., sec. 29. (30.) Beck, C. M. Wf. Mary; ch. Carl, Harry and Hans. P. O. Ross, R. 1. O. 159 ac., sec. 22. (28.) Bonney, John J. Wf. Francis; ch. John and Harold. P. O. Coon Rapids, R. 3. R. 80 ac., sec. 2; R. 80 ac., sec. 11. (3.) Breeder of Duroc Jersey Hogs. Owner, J. C. Bonwell. Bonwell, John C. Ch. Pauline, Gertrude and Leora. P. O. Ross, R....

Massacre at Howard’s Well and Other Depredations – Indian Wars

Closely following the outbreak of the┬áCherokees and half -breed renegades at Whitemore‘s, Barren Fork, came on attack by a similar party of Indians, half breeds, and Mexicans combined, on a train of supplies, en route to Fort Stockton, at Howard’s Well, near old Fort Lancaster. The facts of this one of the most inhuman massacres in history were reported to the “War Department, by Col. Merritt, through General Angua, under date of April 29th, 1872. We give the report as written: On the 20th inst, I arrived with the cavalry of my command at Howard’s Well, a few hours too late to prevent one of the most horrible massacres that has ever been perpetrated on this frontier. A Mexican train, loaded with United States commissary and ordinance stores, on its way from San Antonio to Fort Stockton, was attacked by Indians, plundered and burned. All the people with the train, seventeen souls in all, were killed or wounded, except one woman. My command buried eleven bodies, and brought three wounded men and one woman into this post. Before arriving at the burning train, the first intimation we had of the horrible disaster were the charred and blackened corpses of some of the poor victims, but no one was alive to tell the horrors of the affair. I supposed, up to this time, that Capt. Sheridan, with the infantry of my command was in camp at Howard’s Well, about a mile from the scene of the massacre, and while yet some distance from the point the smoke of the burning wagons, mistaken for his camp fires, confirmed me in this...

Biography of William Edward Cooney

WILLIAM EDWARD COONEY – Both the hotel and the general real estate interests of Northampton have benefited very materially during the past forty years through Mr. Cooney’s association with a development and management of both departments of activity, as his capable methods have been such as to bring substantial results to the community. In earlier years, an all-round printer of widely recognized ability, Mr. Cooney also observed and shared in the growth and advancement of this part of the State through the newspaper and publishing field, and his family have always been known for thorough workmanship in all their undertakings. His grandmother, Ellen (Hanley) Cooney, was the first of this branch to come to the United States; she died in Haydenville, Massachusetts, about 1880. Her husband, Michael Cooney, grandfather of William E. Cooney, lived and died in Ireland. His children were: Michael, of whom further; Elizabeth, who married Michael Keating; Katherine, who married Michael Hearn; Ellen, who married John Fogerty; Mary, who married a Dady; Johanna, who married a Davin. Michael Cooney, who was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, died in Haydenville, in the town of Williamsburg, Massachusetts, in 1885. He attended school in Ireland, and came to the United States when he was nineteen years of age, stopping first in Brooklyn, New York, and thence coming to Leeds, Massachusetts, where he was employed for awhile in the Musgrave Woolen Mill. He then went to Haydenville, to work in the Japan Button Shop, and he was afterwards employed by the Haydenville Brass Company as a truckman. He married Rosanna Martin, who was born in Kings County, Ireland, and died...

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