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Clifford Family of New Bedford, MA

Among the most prominent law offices in southern Massachusetts is one which by lineal succession has existed for nearly, if not quite, a hundred years, and in which three generations of the Clifford family have been represented. The members of the Clifford family who have been such important factors in this old and prominent law firm came of a distinguished ancestry. The late John H. Clifford was a direct descendant in the eighth generation from George Clifford, who came with his wife Elizabeth and son John from Arnold village and parish, Nottinghamshire, England, to Boston in 1644.

Descendants of Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman of Taunton, MA

CUSHMAN (Taunton family). The Cushman family of Taunton here briefly reviewed, the family and lineage of the late Hon. Horatio Leonard Cushman, long one of the leading citizens and substantial men of Taunton, at one time the city’s chief executive officer, and who had served most efficiently in both branches of the city government, as alderman and councilman, and who in turn has been followed by his son, Seth Leonard Cushman, Esq., who for many years has been president of the Bristol County National Bank, is a branch of the family bearing the name of ancient Plymouth, which with its allied connections is one of the historic families of New England. Its progenitor, though of short life in New England, was one of the leading spirits in all the preliminary movements in both England and Holland incident to the coming of the “Mayflower” Pilgrims to New England, where his descendants soon allied themselves with those of the “Mayflower” passengers. There follow in brief some of the incidents in the lives of members of this Taunton family, and in those of their forefathers, in chronological order beginning with Robert Cushman, one of the leaders among the Pilgrims. Robert Cushman, a wool carder of Canterbury, England, married (second) at Leyden, Holland, June 3, 1617, Mary, widow of Thomas Chingleton, of Sandwich, England. He was associated with William Brewster as agent of the Leyden Church in negotiations for removal. He came to New England in the “Fortune” in 1621, bringing with him his only son, Thomas. He returned to England on business of the Colony, and died there in 1626. He left...

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Biography of Frederick Myron Colby

Frederick Myron Colby, of Warner, as well as all the Colbys of America, is descended from Anthony Colby, one of the Puritan colonists of Boston in 1630, who subsequently settled in Amesbury, Mass., where the house he dwelt in still stands. The second son of his father, Anthony was a lineal descendant of Sir Robert de Colebi, one of King John’s knights in 1199. The family seat was in the County of Norfolk, England. In early times the name was variously spelled Colby, Colebi, Coleby, Colebey, Colebei, Chaulby, Colbye, and Colebeye. The name of two English towns, as well as that of descendants of the family living in their vicinity, is Coleby; but the family estate in Swardest is called Colby Manor. A Danish form is Koldby. The Colby arms are “argent, a chevron engraved between three scallops, sable, the crest a plumed helm and an arm grasping a naked sword. The motto, ‘Vincit amor patriae.'” Anthony Colby, the American settler, had five sons and three daughters. From Thomas Colby, his fourth son, the line of descent was continued through Jacob, Valentine, Levi, Valentine, and Levi O. to Frederick Myron Colby. The following account of Mr. Colby is taken from the Twentieth Century Review for April, 1890 :- “Frederick Myron Colby, the historical romancer and novelist and the most versatile writer in the Granite State, was born in Warner, N.H., December 9, 1848. He was the son of Levi O. and Mary (Durelle) Colby. His early education was obtained in the schools of his native town and of Concord. He never attended college, but his knowledge is extensive and...

Biography of Hon. Ira Colby

Hon. Ira Colby, one of the leading lawyers of the State of New Hampshire, was born in Claremont, N.H., January 11, 1831, son of Ira and Polly (Foster) Colby, both of purely English descent. Their families in the various branches number many persons of distinction. On the maternal side he is descended from Reginald Foster, who came from Exeter, Devonshire, England, and settled in Ipswich, Essex County, Mass., in 1638. It has been stated in an account of the descendants of Joseph Stickney, which appeared in the New Hampshire Granite Monthly of July, 1892, that the family of this Reginald is honorably mentioned in “The Lay of the Last Minstrel” and “Marmion.” When Mrs. Colby was eleven years of age, her father removed with his family from Essex, Mass., to Henniker, N.H., to prevent his sons from becoming seafaring men. She there met Mr. Colby, a native of the place. They were married April 17, 1827, and immediately removed to Claremont, where they ever afterward lived. Mr. Colby was one of the most successful and enterprising farmers of his town, and was honored with many positions of trust. He served as a Selectman in the years 1858 and 1859 and as a Representative of the town in the legislature of New Hampshire in 1872 and 1873. He died in 1873, at the age of seventy years. The subject of this sketch lived at his father’s, and worked upon the farm on “Bible Hill,” so called, until seventeen years of age, his only schooling up to that time having been obtained at the district schools. He then entered Marlow Academy,...

Biographical Sketch of Joseph Colby

Colby, Joseph (deceased), Lincoln, from whom descends a numerous family, was born in Ware, N. H., on August 14, 1787. He settled in South Lincoln, Vt., in 1827, on the present home of Henry Clay, taking up about 150 acres. His wife was Lydia Gove, who was born in March, 1786; she was a daughter of Stephen Gove. Joseph Colby had a family of nine children born to him — Rodney G. (born on December 21, 1808, and died on March 6, 1855), Fannie (born on September 11, 1810, now Mrs. Simeon Palmer, of Lincoln, Vt.), Page (born on July 5, 1812; is now a resident of Bristol, Vt.), Abigail (born on June 21, 1816, now Mrs. Nelson Chase, of Lincoln, Vt.), Stephen G. (born on July 31, 1814, of Lincoln, Vt.), Louise (deceased; was born on May 12, 1818; married Esquire Gove), Mary A. (born on August 7, 1826; died on February 15, 1828), Edmund G. (born on January 24, 1822), Lydia A. (now Mrs. Stephen Colby; was born on April 6, 1824), Moses G. (born on August 24, 1827, died on April 30, 1828), Milo (born on March 13, 1829, died on March 22, 1859). Mr. Joseph Colby died on October 10, 1855, and his wife, Lydia, died on June 10, 1862. Their son Edward G., one of the prominent farmers of Lincoln, Vt., married Hannah Farr, a daughter of Jesse B. and Hannah Farr, of Bristol, Vt. She was born on September 28, 1831. Their children are Harvey C., Alson B., Emma (now Mrs. Louis Bain), Addie E., one infant who died at an early age,...

Biographical Sketch of Jonathan Colby

Colby, Jonathan (deceased), Lincoln, was born in the town of Deering, N. H. He came from Ware, N. H., to Lincoln, Vt., in 1839; bought fifty acres of land in the southern part of Lincoln, Vt., which are now owned by Chester Bingham. He was a carpenter and joiner by trade, a business which he followed for some time after settling in Lincoln, Vt. He died in 1846. His wife was Hannah Wilson, a daughter of Robert and Rebecca Wilson, natives of New Boston, N. H. They had a family of six children born to them — Daniel S. (deceased), Eliza J. (now Mrs. John Elliott, of Burlington, Vt.), Hannah L. (married James A. Heath, of Rutland, Vt.), Stephen N. (born on February 4, 1822); came from Tewksbury, Mass., in 1841, without money. After a few years he purchased a farm of fifty acres and then engaged in farming. He was married on December 8, 1842, to Lydia A. Colby, a daughter of Joseph Colby, and by her has had a family of three children — Cleora L. (now Mrs. William Hoag, of Lincoln, Vt.), Irving A., and Nettie A., who is now at home. Mr. Colby represented his town in the Legislature in 1867 and 1868; was selectman for several years during the war; has been justice of the peace for many years since 1851, and all the time, with the exception of four years, since 1860. His son, Irving A. Colby, was born on April 28, 1845, on the old fifty-acre homestead. He was married on April 28, 1868, to Elizabeth S. Elliott, a daughter of Zira...

Delphine Todd Colby of Los Angeles CA

COLBY, Delphine Todd9, (Theodore C.8, Ora B.7, Bela6, Caleb5, Gideon4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) died about 1912, Married Frank Colby. Mrs. Colby was teacher of Pipe Organ and Piano and a popular soloist in Los Angeles, Calif. She had an exceedingly fine voice and taught voice culture. She was the musical critic for the Los Angeles Times and other Los Angeles papers. Child: I. Harvey, b., about...

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