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Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – C Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. – Name (Lena Riggs) – Wife’s maiden name. Martha and Cora Abbey – Mother and Sister Kirkwood R1 – Postoffice Kirkwood, R.F.D. 1. Tompking Sec8-5 – Township Tompking, Sections 8-5. T80a – Tenant on 80 acres. H.M. Abbey Est. – Owner of 80 acres. (1886) – Lived in county since 1886. Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood – Farmers’ Line Telephone Kirkwood. C Surnames CABLE BROS., Arthur L. Benn D., Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec18-30 O160a (1860) Mutual Tel. Monmouth CABLE, Charles H. (Phebe Jane Baldwin) Ch *Florence M., *Newton B.; Monmouth R6 Floyd Sec29 O60a (1860) Mutual Tel. Berwick CABLE, Frank E. (Irene Sheldon) Ch Ruth, *H Sheldon; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8-17 O400a (1862) Private Tel. Berwick CABLE, Hiram Sheldon (Eunice Ralston)Ch Martha; Berwick R1 Berwick Sec8 T76a Mrs. Irene Cable (1893) Berwick Tel. Berwick CABLE, Newton B. (Della Stilfield) Ch Jane; Berwick Floyd Sec32 T158a Donald L. Atkin (1888) CALDEN, Fred W. (Gertrude Beard) Ch Dorothy; Alexis R2 Kelly Sec8-5 O320a Sec4 T80a Fannie E. Calden (1870) Tel. Farmers’ Line Alexis...

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War,1 “when we had not a correct knowledge of the location of the Creek Indians nor of the features of the country.” This situation produced much unhappiness and contention between the people of the two tribes. The Indians had other grievances, and the Creeks took the lead in calling the attention of the officials to their needs by the preparation of a memorial in which they complained of frequent attacks upon them by bands of wild Indians from the south and west of their location. They asked the Government to appoint a commission to meet with them for the redress of their wrongs, and to call a council of the different tribes for the adoption of measures to establish peace and security in their new home. The Creek memorial and a long report by the Secretary of War on February 16, 1832, were transmitted to Congress by President Jackson,2 who recommended that three commissioners be appointed as requested in the memorial, and recommended by the Secretary. It appeared from the report of the Secretary of War that there were then west of the Mississippi twenty-five hundred Creeks, six thousand Choctaw, thirty-five hundred Cherokee and...

Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors.1 French Influence in Arkansas One of the first of the French traders up the Arkansas whose name has been recorded was Joseph Bogy, an early resident of the old French town, Arkansas Post, from which point he traded with the Osage Indians in the vicinity of the Three Forks. On one of his expeditions he had ascended the Arkansas with a boatload of merchandise, to trade to the Osage near the mouth of the Verdigris. There on the seventh of January, 1807, he was attacked and robbed of all his goods by a large band of Choctaw Indians under the famous chief, Pushmataha.2 When charged with the offense, Pushmataha admitted it and justified the robbery on the ground that they were at war with the Osage, against whom they were proceeding at the time; and that as Bogy was trading with their enemies, he was a proper subject for reprisal. Bogy laid a claim before the Government for nine thousand dollars damages against the Choctaw, based on the protection guaranteed by his trader’s license. This claim was pending until after 1835, before it was allowed. Among the interesting papers in connection with the claim, is Bogy’s report of having met on...

Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report1 that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen, and accompanied by Major Long, topographical engineer, had left that city for the purpose of establishing a military post on the Arkansas near the Osage boundary. Major Stephen H. Long, at “Post of Ozark fifty miles up the Arkansas,” reported2 that he was ordered on a mission to the Forks of the Arkansas thence across country by land to Red River; thence to return by land to Saint Louis. “On the Arkansaw near the place where the Osage line strikes this river, I am to select a position for a military post to be under the command of Major Bradford, who is now at this place with his company, destined for that command. This business I am in hopes to accomplish by the first of December.” The point chosen by Long and Bradford for a military post was at the junction of the Poteau and Arkansas rivers called by the French, Belle Point, and after some years known as Fort Smith, after General Thomas A. Smith.3 On this expedition, Long ascended as high as the falls of the Verdigris, and made an observation of the longitude and latitude at...

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

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