Indian Captivity Narratives

The Abduction of Daniel Boone's Daughter by the Indians

This collection contains entire narratives of Indian captivity; that is to say, we have provided the reader the originals without the slightest abridgement. Some of these captivities provide little in way of customs and manners, except to display examples of the clandestine warfare Native Americans used to accomplish their means. In almost every case, there was a tug of war going on between principle government powers, French, American, British, and Spanish, and these powers used the natural prowess of the Indians to assist them in causing warfare upon American and Canadian settlers. There were definitely thousands of captivities, likely tens of thousands, as the active period of these Indian captivity narratives covers 150 years. Unfortunately, few have ever been put under a pen by the original captive, and as such, we have little first-hand details on their captivity. These you will find here, are only those with which were written by the captive or narrated to another who could write for them; you shall find in a later collection, a database of known captives, by name, location, and dates, and a narrative about their captivity along with factual sources. But that is for another time.



Experience Bozarth’s Heroic Stand – Indian Captivities

Signal Prowess of a Woman, In a Combat with Some Indians. In a Letter to a Lady of Philadelphia Westmoreland, April 26, 1779. Madam, I have written an account of a very particular affair between a white man and two Indians.1 I am now to give you a relation in which you will see how a



Presbyterian Cemetery Records, Lakehurst, Ocean County, New Jersey

Cemetery transcription for Presbyterian Cemetery in Lakehurst, Ocean County, NJ. BICKERTON Louisa, b. 1829, d. 4 Aug. 1882, ae. 53 yrs. Wife of Charles Bickerton. BICKFORD George A., b. 1 Jan. 1871, d. 20 Mar. 1871, ae. 3 mos., 20 days. Son of N. G. and E. D. Bickford. BOZARTH John G., b. 19 May



Washington Settlers from Oregon

William Craig was born in Greenbriar County, Virginia, in 1810. He entered the service of the American Fur Company in 1830, and for ten years led the life of a trapper. When the fur companies broke up, about 1810, he came to Oregon, and settled not long after at Lapwai, near Spalding’s mission, to which



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