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Indian Captivity Narratives

This collection contains entire narratives of Indian captivity; that is to say, we have provided the reader the originals without the slightest abridgement. Some of these captivities provide little in way of customs and manners, except to display examples of the clandestine warfare Native Americans used to accomplish their means. In almost every case, there was a tug of war going on between principle government powers, French, American, British, and Spanish, and these powers used the natural prowess of the Indians to assist them in causing warfare upon American and Canadian settlers. There were definitely thousands of captivities, likely tens of thousands, as the active period of these Indian captivity narratives covers 150 years. Unfortunately, few have ever been put under a pen by the original captive, and as such, we have little first-hand details on their captivity. These you will find here, are only those with which were written by the captive or narrated to another who could write for them; you shall find in a later collection, a database of known captives, by name, location, and dates, and a narrative about their captivity along with factual sources. But that is for another time.

Experience Bozarth’s Heroic Stand – Indian Captivities

Signal Prowess of a Woman, In a Combat with Some Indians. In a Letter to a Lady of Philadelphia Westmoreland, April 26, 1779. Madam, I have written an account of a very particular affair between a white man and two Indians.1 I am now to give you a relation in which you will see how a person of your sex acquitted herself in defense of her own life, and that of her husband and children. The lady who is the burthen of this story is named Experience Bozarth. She lives on a creek called Dunkard creek, in the southwest corner of this county. About the middle of March last, two or three families, who were afraid to stay at home, gathered to her house and there stayed; looking on themselves to be safer than when all scattered about at their own houses. On a certain day some of the children thus collected came running in from play in great haste, saying there were ugly red men. One of the men in the house stepped to the door, where he received a ball in the side of his breast, which caused him to fall back into the house. The Indian was immediately in over him, and engaged with another man who was in the house. The man tossed the Indian on a bed, and called for a knife to kill him. (Observe these were all the men that were in the house.) Now Mrs. Bozarth appears the only defense, who, not finding a knife at hand, took up an axe that lay by, and with one blow cut out the brains...

Presbyterian Cemetery Records, Lakehurst, Ocean County, New Jersey

Cemetery transcription for Presbyterian Cemetery in Lakehurst, Ocean County, NJ. BICKERTON Louisa, b. 1829, d. 4 Aug. 1882, ae. 53 yrs. Wife of Charles Bickerton. BICKFORD George A., b. 1 Jan. 1871, d. 20 Mar. 1871, ae. 3 mos., 20 days. Son of N. G. and E. D. Bickford. BOZARTH John G., b. 19 May 1808, d. 21 Oct. 1880, ae. 72 yrs., 5 mos., 2 days. Husband of Susanna P. Bozarth. Susana P., b. 30 Mar. 1819, d. 12 Mar. 1896, ae. 76 yrs., 11 mos., 10 days. Wife of John G. Bozarth. DAGE Catherine E., b. 1866, d. 17 June 1894, ae. 28 yrs. Dau. of Edwin and Hannah Dage. DARR Sallie J., b. 19 Jan. 1884, d. 31 Mar. 1887, ae. 3 yrs., 2 mos., 12 days. Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY INTL Start Now DENIKE Mary A., b. 6 Jan. 1805, d. 1 June 1891, ae. 86 yrs., 4 mos., 25 days. Wife of Robert Denike. DENNIS Ann Downs, b. 1821. DEWEIT Harriet, b. June 1830, d. 16 Feb. 1869, ae. 38 yrs., 8 mos. Lucy Emma, b. July 1868, d. 10 Jan. 1869, ae. 6 mos. Dau. of Harriet Deweit. DOWNS William, b. 1820, d. 16 Feb. 1895, ae. 75 yrs. Co. F....

Washington Settlers from Oregon

William Craig was born in Greenbriar County, Virginia, in 1810. He entered the service of the American Fur Company in 1830, and for ten years led the life of a trapper. When the fur companies broke up, about 1810, he came to Oregon, and settled not long after at Lapwai, near Spalding’s mission, to which he rendered valuable assistance in controlling the Indians. He also was of much service to Gov. Stevens in making treaties with the Indians of eastern Washington. Stevens appointed him on his staff, with the rank of Lieutenant colonel, and he was afterward appointed Indian agent at Lapwai, for’ which position he was well fitted, and which he held for a long time. ‘But for his liberality he would have been rich, but he has given away enough to make several fortunes.’ Walla Walla Union, Oct. 23, 1869. ‘He was the comrade in the mountains of Kit Carson, J. L. Meek, Robert Newell, Courtenay Walker, Thompson, Rahboin, and a host of other brave men whose names are linked with the history of the country.’ Walla Walla Statesman, in Portland Oregonian, Oct. 30, 1869. Here are a few men who settled in Washington at an early period, but who had first resided in Oregon: Solomon Strong, born in Erie co., N. V., Nov. 11, 1817. At the age of fourteen years removed to Ohio, thence to Iowa, and thence, in 1847, to Or., with an ox-team, with his wife and one child, George W., born in 1S43, in Iowa. Strong settled on a claim seven miles from Portland, residing there until Sept. 17, 1850, when he...

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