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Oneida Tribal Stone, Utica, New York

The tribal name of the Oneida Nation, one of the nations of the Iroquois Confederacy, is Tiioneniote ‘There it is, a Rock has Set up’. They the Oneidas’ are known as The People of the Upright Stone. In ancient days there appeared near their main village a large granite boulder. When later they moved their village, they were surprised to find that this boulder had followed them and was resting near the new village. This strange thing happened several times and they soon regarded the Stone as a sacred monument, a guardian of their nation and people, their Tribal Guardian. The Rock followed them in all of their migrations. The boulder, known as The Oneida Stone, remained near them as long as they lived in the Oneida Country, now central New York State. When the Oneida People moved to Wisconsin and Canada the Stone remained behind, alone and neglected. Years later, interested white people moved the stone to Utica, N. Y. where it was placed in an imposing spot in the corner of one of their beautiful cemeteries. There the young Mohawks saw the sacred Stone. At the base of the boulder they read the inscription: “Sacred Stone of the Oneida Indians. This was the national altar of the Oneida Indians around which they gathered from year to year to celebrate solemn religious rites and to worship the Great Spirit. They were known as the Tribe of the Upright Stone. This valuable historic relic was brought here from Stockbridge, Madison County, N. Y. in 1849.” Heading southwest out of Utica, and still following the Central Trail of the Six...

Monument to Onondaga Indians, Syracuse, New York

Leaving the Onondaga Reservation the warriors turned north for the City of Syracuse. In a park beside one of their main streets near the New York Central Railroad, the warriors saw a small stone memorial. This was erected by the citizens of Syracuse in honour of the Onondaga Indians who saved the early white settlers of that city from death by hunger and sickness. The stone bore the inscription: Monument to Onondaga Indians, Syracuse, New York To the Onondaga Indians: In 1793 out of a total population of thirty-three inhabitants in the Village of Salina, thirty persons were sick. The remaining three inhabitants with the help of neighborly and friendly Onondaga Indians took care of the sick for two months. In the following year the population had grown to sixty three persons, of whom twenty three died that year. This tablet is placed in grateful appreciation of helpful assistance of the Onondagas to the pioneer settlers of here in founding the City of Syracuse. – Erected by the state Education Dept., Syracuse Chapter of S. A. R., and City of Syracuse, 1934. From Syracuse the Mohawks once more headed down the Great Central Trail of the Iroquois to the City of Auburn. There, in the Fort Hill Cemetery, Fort Street, Auburn, the warriors saw the remains of a huge Indian mound in the center of which was a gigantic stone shaft monument erected to a great Cayuga Chief named Logan.  ...

Monument To Deh-He-Wa-Mis (Mary Jemison) At Letchworth Park, New York

Mary Jemison was taken as a captive by a band of Seneca Indians at March Creek, Pennsylvania in 1776. She was carried down the Ohio River where she was adopted into a Seneca Indian family. In 1759 she moved with the Senecas to the Genesee River Country. She was aged 91 years when she died, Sept. 13, 1833. When offered her freedom, this white woman refused, preferring to live and die with her Seneca People. On one occasion she said, that the life of the old time Indian, before he was given liquor and crowded by the white man, was the happiest life known. She defended her adopted people on many occasions and preferred to be an Iroquois to the end. Over her grave is an impressive monument. It bears the inscription: “To the memory or Mary Jemison, whose home during more than 70 years of a life of strange vicissitude was among the Senecas upon the banks of this river and whose history inseparably connected with that of this valley has caused her to be known as the white woman of the Genesee. Her bones lie beneath this monument.” Near her grave the warriors saw an ancient Seneca Indian Long House.      ...

Monument to Kaniatario, Handsome Lake, at Onondago Reservation

In 1735 at the Seneca Indian Town of Conawagus on the Genesee River there was born an Indian boy who was later to become one of the greatest Indian Prophets and teachers of recent historical date. This Seneca was later given the office of a chief of the Turtle Clan with the title of Kaniatario or Handsome Lake. As a young man Handsome Lake was everything but a religious teacher. He was a habitual drinker of the white man’s fire water and more than once returned from the towns of the invader under the influence of the white man’s curse. At this time, in spite of the promises of the United States Government to keep the fur traders from bringing rum into Indian towns and in spite of the warnings of the Confederate Chiefs to these same traders, rum was circulated freely among the Iroquois. The Senecas, who had lost most of their country and who were becoming more and more surrounded by the whites, sought to forget their troubles by drinking rum. Under such conditions Handsome Lake lived. Finally, after years of drinking, Handsome Lake became very ill, so ill that for four years he lay an invalid, not able to rise from his bed. At the end of the fourth year he walked from his cabin and fell to the earth, seemingly dead. His daughter immediately told his other relatives of his death. His body was dressed in his ceremonial clothes and he was prepared for burial. When his relatives gathered for the death ceremony he surprised everyone by sitting up, as his followers say, “Came to...

Monuments To Six Nation Indians

One early dawn of the Moon of New Grass a group of young Awkesasne warriors started on a tour through the eastern country, their destination, every known marker or important monument erected to Six Nation Indians. The young Mohawks did not travel on foot as did their ancient forefathers. They traveled by car upon hard paved highways, that traced the well worn paths of the old Iroquois.

Mohawk Monument, Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia

Near Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, stands a monument erected in memory of a group of Mohawks who, in 1712 were enlisted by the English and taken to Annapolis Royal to secure the peace of the country. A company of Mohawks had served under Major Livingston at the capture of Annapolis and had done good service on the occasion. The English colony was in danger because of the French inhabitants who were stirring up trouble between the Mic-Mac Indians and the English and were threatening to take over the colony. The Mohawks upon arrival in Annapolis built a fort in the most proper place for defense. The very presence of the Mohawks was sufficient to keep the Nova Scotia French and Mia-Macs quiet. Vetch, the English commander, wrote of these Mohawks, “They are of wonderful use, and better than three times the number of white men.” Again he wrote, ” They are better than four times the number of British troops.” The marker of the Mohawk fort is located near the old Glebe House, now owned and occupied by Mr. Arnold Corp and family. One wonders, after knowing of the numerous occasions that the warriors of the Six Nations aided and protected the English colonies when they were as babies in a strange land, how England could possibly “save Face” when during the years 1923-1924 she turned her head, allowing the Canadian Government to invade the little country called Six Nations Land, seize the Six Nation Council House, break open the safe holding the records of the Six Nations, steal the sacred wampum belts of the people, arrest and jail...

Monument To Canesque, A Seneca Chief, Naples, New York

At the end of beautiful Canandaigua Lake, one of the Finger Lakes of New York State, in the region of Bare Hill, sacred mountain of the Senecas, rest the bones of an old Seneca Chief. Over his remains stands a stone upon which is the following inscription: “Canesque, Chief of the Senecas at Nundawee Village, who came from the Genesee Reservation in 1794 to die and be buried in his beloved Kiandaga Valley.” As the Mohawks looked at this place they realized that this land, the place from whence the Senecas sprung from Mother Earth, was sacred ground. Heading north up the beautiful lake the warriors saw a mountain known to the whites as Bare Hill. They knew that they were looking at Gennudewah, sacred mountain of the Senecas. Tradition has it that the Seneca Nation had their origin in this mountain, Gennudewah, near the head of Canandaigua Lake, At the modern village of Canandaigua they saw a small metal marker telling of the sacred hill of the Senecas. In a small park in the center of the Village of Canandaigua the Mohawk warriors saw a rock upon which was a metal plate. This was the spot where the famous Canandaigua Treaty was held between the Six Nations and the Thirteen Colonies. Treaty Rock....

Monument To Guyanoga, Guyanoga Valley, New York

This monument to Chief Guyanoga, located in Village of Guyanoga near Branchport was unveiled on August 27, 1910 at the first annual Jerusalem Farmers’ Picnic held at the four corners in Guyanoga Valley. It was to Commemorate the character of the chief after whom the valley was named. The wigwam of Chief Guyanoga was situated on the land of Fraud Botsford near this point. Guyanoga was known as one of the great men of the Seneca Nation and was in favor of the cause of the colonies during the Revolution. He was known to have rendered important services to General Washington. He was known as a great friend of the white man and of the early settlers in this area who were always welcome at his fireside. He was one of the last of the Indians who occupied this valley near Lake Keuka. Heading west from Guyanoga Valley the warriors found themselves in a beautiful country of many high hills. Climbing one of these they saw from its top, the beautiful lake called Canandaigua. They were soon at the tip of Canandaigua Lake. There at the Village of Naples they visited Dr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Parker, Dr. Parker ‘Gawaso Waneh’, himself a Seneca Indian and the greatest living authority on the Iroquois Indians, pointed out several places connected with Seneca history. At the Village of Naples they saw a small monument erected over the grave of an ancient Seneca Chief called Canesque. Monument To Canesque, A Seneca Chief, Naples, New York...

Monument To Aroniateka ‘Fiendich’ Lake George Village, New York

Aroniateka or Chief Hendrick was a Mohawk of the Village of Canajoharie in the Mohawk Valley. In 1618 the Mohawks and other nations of the Iroquois Confederacy made a treaty with the Dutch of Manhattan. When the English took over the Dutch Colony the Treaty of Friendship and Mutual Aid was carried on to these people. The Mohawks, for over three hundred years, held fast to this treaty of friendship, their people considering it a disgrace to ever violate a sacred covenant. In no so-called civilized country can one find a parallel steadfast faith. They fought fiercely and unwaveringly upon the side of the English because of the treaty made so many years before. In 1755, two thousand French soldiers under General Dieskau attempted to invade the Colony of New York by way of Lake George. General William Johnson requested the aid of Chief Hendrick and his Mohawks. He also asked and took the advice of the Mohawk Chief as to how to best defeat the French. The Mohawk Chief joined the English army which met the French at Lake George. At the battle which took place, Sept. 8, 1755, the brave chief and many of his followers were killed. The Mohawks won the fight however and saved the infant colony of New York. Today, in sight of the Lake, there stands a large monument in honor of this Mohawk Chief and William Johnson. Leaving the Lake George Battlefield the Mohawks headed south following the old Warrior Path that led to the Mohawk Country. They were told by their leader that a little way to the west of the...

Mohawk Church, Brantford, Ontario, Canada

When a young man Thayendanegea or Joseph Brant, a Mohawk Pine Tree Chief, perceived the importance of education and religion as aids in carrying forward the moral and social improvement of his nation. One of his first stipulations, on securing Grand River Territory for his people, was the building of a church, a school house and flour mill. The Mohawk Church still stands. On five different occasions different members of the Akwesasne Mohawk Counselor Organization have visited the grave of Joseph Brant and the church which he built for his Mohawks from funds collected in England by himself in 1786 Thayendanegea lies buried near this little church, the first Episcopal Church erected in Upper Canada. Near the tomb of Joseph Brant the warriors saw a unique stone marker, in the shape of a huge arrowhead fastened to a large boulder, erected in memory of Pauline Johnson, a great Mohawk Indian poetess of the Six Nations. They knew that there was another impressive monument erected in the City of Vancouver in honour of this remarkable and talented Iroquois.  ...
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