Biography of Malinda A. Hall

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Malinda Hall
Malinda Hall

Malinda A. Hall rendered six years of faithful and efficient service as assistant matron, and teacher. Having completed the grammar course at Oak Hill in 1900, and then a four years course at Ingleside Seminary in Virginia, she was well prepared for the work at the Academy, and proved a very reliable and valuable helper. She was capable and always willing, when requested, to supply any vacancy occurring among the other helpers. She enjoyed good health, and never lost a day from illness. Her strength and energy enabled her to execute promptly and efficiently, every work entrusted to her. Her work throughout was characterized by a never failing promptness, faithfulness and energy. She was familiar with the needs and traits of her people, was thoroughly devoted to the promotion of their best interests, and her suggestions were always gratefully received. The ability and enthusiasm of her work, as the teacher of a large class in the Sunday school and leader of the young people in their Endeavor meetings, will never be forgotten by those, who came within the sphere of her voice and influence.

Since her marriage in 1911 to William Stewart she has been devoting her time and attention to the improvement of their home on the farm near Valliant. She is needed on the farm, but the thought lingers, that there continues to be a great need for her services in the educational work among her people.

Miss Hall’s exploits, as a sharpshooter with her own gun, during her first year as a teacher at Oak Hill, indicate her responsiveness to the spirit of chivalry that prevailed among the people during the period of her youth.

One day in the spring of the year, while hunting eggs in the second story of the old log house, she discovered a large snake on one of the rafters over her head. Hastening quietly to her own room for a gun, she brought the snake to the floor with the first shot. It measured over four feet in length, was dark in color and was of the kind that eats eggs and chicks, commonly called a chicken snake. She also, at the request of Mrs. Flickinger, stunned a small beef, that they together butchered; at a time the superintendent was absent.



MLA Source Citation:

Flickinger, Robert Elliott. Choctaw Freedmen and Oak Hill Industrial Academy, Valliant, Oklahoma. Presbyterian Board of Missions for Freedmen. Pittsburgh. 1914 AccessGenealogy.com. Web. 26 November 2014. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/oklahoma/biography-of-malinda-a-hall.htm - Last updated on May 5th, 2012


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