- Access Genealogy - http://www.accessgenealogy.com -

Peggy Coker, Choctaw

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In Native American,Oklahoma | No Comments

Department Of The Interior,
Muskogee. Okla., December 21, 1910.

In the matter of the application for the enrollment of Peggie Coker as a citizen by blood of the Choctaw Nation.

Proceedings had at McAlester, Okla., December 16, 1910, before C. F. Bliss, supervising district agent.

Appearances: Peggie Coker is represented by her attorney, M. M. Lindley, of McAlester, Okla.: McCurtain & Hill, by D. C. McCurtain, attorneys for Choctaw Nation.


Peggy Coker, being first duly sworn, testified as follows:
By Mr. Lindley:

Q. State your name, please.-
A. Peggie Coker. I was a McGee before I was married, but now my name is Coker.
Q. How old are you?-
A. Well, I reckon I am about 70 years old.
Q. Where do you live?-
A. I live at Dow, Okla., No. 9.
Q. How long have you been living in the Territory?-
A. I have been living in the Territory for years; first one place, then another. After my mother died, I Just lived around-awhile at Hartshorn, then at Wilburton, and then other places.
Q. About how many years have you lived in the Territory, can you tell?-
A. I have been living in the house I now live in for nine years. We are paying $7 a mouth for the house, and we have been living right in that same place for nine years.
Q. Did you ever live any place outside of the Territory?-
A. No. Mr.
Q. You have lived here all your life, have you?-
A. Yes. sir; just lived around from one place to another.
Q. State the name of your father.-
A. Humphrey McGee.
Q. What nation was he-to what Indian tribe did he belong?-
A. To the Chickasaw.
Q. Where did he live?-
A. Lived In the nation, in the Chickasaw Nation.
Q. State what place-near what town?-
A. You know I don’t have no education, I was taking care of my children and traveling around from place to place.
Q. Do you know how much Indian blood your father had?-
A. I don’t know how much he had-I can’t tell you how much he had-he was a Chickasaw Injun. That’s all I know.
Q. Now state the name of your mother.-
A. Eunice McGee.
Q. To what tribe of Indians did she belong?-
A. To the Choctaw.
Q. Where did she live?-
A. In the nation; she was buried over here on the Canadian River.
Q. How long has she been dead?-
A. Lord! I don’t know; she has been dead 30 years, and maybe 40 years.
Q. Do you know whether or not her name is on the rolls of the nation?–
A. I don’t know whether It is or not, but I know I have been putting in a long time trying to be put on the roll. I have been putting in about seven or eight years.
Q. Now state what efforts you have made to have yourself enrolled as a member of the tribe.-
A. Well. 1 have had two or three lawyers and I have been to Muskogee three different times, and the last time I was there I went to the commissioner and be slapped his hand down on the table and said, “Your land is here and your money is here, but the rolls are closed and you can’t get it.”
Q. Have you any brothers or sisters?-
A. No, sir; I have got no brothers and sisters-they are all dead; but I have got four children-four daughters-living.
Q. State the name of your oldest child.-
A. My oldest daughter is Maryann Coker; her name is now Maryann Smotherland.
Q. Has she any children?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Give their names, beginning with the name of the oldest one.-
A. Well, there is Frank Coker; he is by her first husband; and the other child is by her second husband. Smotherland.
Q. What are their names?-
A. Perry Smotherland and
Q. How old Is he: do you know?-
A. I just can’t tell you.
Q. About how old?-
A. I can’t tell you exactly how old.
Q. Well, about how old?-
A. I guess he’s 23 or 24.
Q. What is the name of the next one?-
A. Catherine; that Is his sister- Perry’s sister.
Q. Is she married?-
A. No, sir.
Q. About how old Is she?-
A. Going on 21.
Q. What is the name of your next child?-
A. My next child is my son Andrew,
Q. Has he any children?-
A. He is dead.
Q. Well, has he any children?-
A. Yes, sir: he has three children.
Q. What are their names?-
A. George, Andrew, and Mary.
Q. How old is George?-
A. About 18 or 19 years old.
Q. How old Is this second one?-
A. The other two are younger.
Q. What is the name of the third child?-
A. My third child? ‘
Q. Yes.-
A. Roxie Ward: she is the mother of six children.
Q. Give the name of the oldest one.-
A. Henry.
Q. How old is Henry?-
A. I don’t know: maybe about 25 or 30 years old.
Q. What is the name of the next one?-
A. They always called him “Son.” His name is-I don’t know. Let’s see what is his name. Thorp are so many of them I have forgot.
Q. What is the name of the third one?-
A. I will tell you now in a minute. Quint Presley: she lives in South Town.
Q. That la a girl?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. What Is the name of the next one?-
A. Now what is that child’s name
Q. How old Is Quint?-
A. I don’t know exactly how old she is. You know, there is a generation of them.
Q. You stated that there are six in all?-
A. Yes sir. No, sir: she aint got but three. I am talking about Quint Presley; she has got three children-two boys and one girl.
Q. Do you know about the children of the rest of them-the older ones?-
A. No. sir.
Q. Give me the name of your next child?-
A. Emeline Cottonham.
Q. How many children has Emeline Cottonham?-
A. Six living children.
Q. Can you give their names?-
A. No. sir: I can’t give all their names.
Q. How many can you think of-do you know the oldest one?-
A. The oldest one is named Henry: then there is Hubert and Reynolds and Willie and Miller and Devie-they always called her Devie.
Q. That la a girl?-
A. Yes, sir; this Quint Presley Is her daughter, and lives in McAlester.
Q. Well, now you said you had six children?-
A. Yes, sir; I have got three dead and four living.
Q. Well, now give me the name of the fifth one?-
A. My next daughter is- her name is Manday Simms. She aint living now though; she died after she was married.
Q. Did Mandy Simms leave any children?-
A. Three.
Q. What are their names?-
A. Margaret, Andrew, and George.
Q. How old Is the oldest one?-
A. About 20 years old.
Q. Do you know the ages of the other ones?-
A. No. sir.
Q. They are younger?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Now give me the name of the sixth child-that is five-the last one is Margaret?-
A. Margaret, and then Henry-Margaret, Andrew, and Henry.
Q. Did Andrew have any children?-
A. He wasn’t married.
Q. Is he living?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Where does he live?-
A. Somewhere in Alabama : I don’t know where.
Q. The last one is Henry and George; where is George?-
A. I don’t know where he is; I haven’t seen him for nine years.
Q. Now with reference to your children, how many of them live in the Territory?-
A. Four of them; the balance married and lit out, and I don’t know where they went to.
Q. Which four live in the Territory?-
A. Mary Ann, Perry, and George, and Andrew; they have been living in the Territory, and their grandchildren, and the girls they married, and some went to one place and some to another. Cusanna Coker is my baby daughter.
Q. She lives, here?-
A. Yes; she tends to all my business for me; lives with me and takes care of me.
Q. Has she got any children?-
A. She’s got two sons and one daughter.
(). Where does she live?-A. Lives in the house with me.
Q. Where is that?-
A. At Dow. at No. 9; the children live right there with me. I couldn’t live without her. I couldn’t tend to my business, and she looks after everything for me.
Q. Have you been sick a good deal and not able to attend to your own business?-
A. Yes. sir: for three years she took care of me, and even picked me up and laid me on the bed.
Q. Now, as you remember it you have given the names of your children and grandchildren, except the children of Mrs. Tucker, and she gave in those herself?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. When did you make application before the Dawes Commission at Muskogee?-
A. About three years ago. I have made it there three times. It has been longer than that.
Q. How long has it been?-
A. I don’t know.
Q. Can you fix the time by years?-
A. No. sir: I can’t exactly tell you, but I went to Muskogee three times. I went before a man on the third story and be said he couldn’t do anything for me.
Q. Well, I want to know when that was?-
A. It has been three or four years ago.
Q. Who went with you?-
A. My daughter and Mr. Perry from South Town and this old gentleman that lives out here in the country. I can’t think of his name-Oh, yes McKinney.
Q. That was the last time you went?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. And that was over three years ago?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. When was the time before that?-
A. I can’t exactly tell you, but I have been there three times.
Q. Well, I am trying to fix the date.-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Now, how long before?-
A. I can’t exactly tell you.
Q. As near as you can.-
A. I just can’t tell you.
Q. When was the first time you went there?-
A. I went before Mr. Lindley the first time, and then I had letters from the-I can’t give his name.
Q. Have you got those letters now?-
A. I have got that many [indicating] at home.
Q. From the Dawes Commission?-
A. Yes, sir; and from Washington.
Q. Will you send those letters in?-
A. I was ordered to go to Muskogee, and when I went and talked to the Dawes commissioner, and had all my witnesses there, and spent $27 of my money, and he slapped his hand on the table, and he said “Your money is here and your land is here, but yon can’t get it, the rolls are closed,” and I walked out. I says. “Well, if I don’t get it before I die. I would leave plenty of kin to fight for it after I was dead.”
Q. How did you apply?-
A. Well, I told him what letters I had and all about it-that was all I could do.
Q. Did yon say your mother was a full-blood Choctaw?-
A. Yes, sir: a full-blood Choctaw, and my father was a Chickasaw.
Q. Did your mother raise you?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. How long did you live with your mother V-
A. I can’t exactly tell you how long.
Q. Can you speak the Choc-taw language?-
A. No, sir.
Q. Your mother was a full-blood Choctaw, you said?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Did she talk the Choctaw language?–
A. Yes, sir; and she talked to me, but I couldn’t understand what she was saying.
Q. She didn’t talk English to you?-
A. No, sir; I never did try to talk Choctaw.

By Mr. McCurtain:

Q. I wish you would please remove that shawl and handkerchief from your head, please?-
A. Yes, sir. I use to have more hair than anybody, but it has all fell out.
Q. If you made application over three years ago there was a record made of your application at that time, wasn’t there?-
A. Yes, sir; it has been six years.
Q. It has been six years since you first made application?-
A.Yes, sir; I think it has.
Q. And at that time you made application to the Dawes Commission?-
A. Yes, sir.

We want the record to show that we object to the consideration of this case or any of the testimony offered, for the reason that it appears from the witness’s own statements that this is an adjudicated case.

Q. Did you apply to be enrolled as a Choctaw or Chickasaw or as a Choctaw or Chickasaw freedman?-
A. I don’t know anything about freedmen. I’ve never been a slave-nobody never owned me.
Q. Did your daughters marry white men?-
A. Yes, sir; both of them is married-just about half white.
Q. What is the other half ?-
A. Injun.
Q. Have they applied for enrollment to your knowledge?-
A. No. sir.
Q. Are any of your daughters’ husbands been enrolled?-
A. No, sir.
Q. Did they ever apply for enrollment that you know of?-
A. No, sir.
Q. If they are one-half Indian, as yon say, why didn’t they apply for enrollment?-
A. I don’t know.
Q. Have your daughters ever made application for enrollment?-
A. No, sir.
Q. Why not?-
A. Well, everything got so dull in this country it looked like it was no use, but I thought I would see if I could get it.

Note.-Examine the records of the Dawes Commission as to application of Peggie Coker.

Q. Do you know of anyone now living who knew your mother?-
A. Sir? .
Q. Do yon know of anyone now living who knew your mother?-
A. There is a man in there (referring to adjoining room) who knows all my folks. He is kin to me. My mother died and is buried on the Canadian River. He is kin to me and knows a great many of my people.
Q. When you applied for the enrollment of yourself, did you apply for the enrollment of any of your children you have named in our testimony?-
A. I didn’t at that time.
Q. You did not?-
A. No, sir.
Q. Why not?-
A. He didn’t give me the chance. When I was ordered to Muskogee he just told me
Q. Yon say you were ordered to Muskogee; how were you ordered there?- A. I was ordered by the fellow-I can’t never call his name.
Q. The Secretary of the Interior?-
A. Yes, sir; that’s the fellow.
Q. Did he write you a letter?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Have you got that letter?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Will you file that letter in this case?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. This gentleman that you spoke of, did he know your father?-
A. Sir?
Q. This gentleman that yon spoke of, did he know your father?-
A. He knows a great many of my people, but he didn’t know my father and mother.

By Mr. Lindley:

Q. All of these people that you said went to Muskogee with you when you went up there, you took as witnesses?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Now, could your mother talk any English at all?-
A. No, sir.
Q. Do you know whether or not your case that you spoke of, as being about six year’s ago, was ever presented to the Dawes Commission?-
A. Yes, sir; I went to Muskogee. I was sent for by the Secretary of the Interior.
Q. Did you make application at that time?
A. I made it, but they turned me down. They-he put his hand on the table and he said your money is here
Q. Did he ask you any questions?-
A. I suppose so.
Q. Did you testify as to your mother and father?-
A. He didn’t question me about that.
Q. Well, you went there for the purpose of making a record, but none was made?-
A. No, sir; he wouldn’t let me have it.
Q. Well, now, did Mrs. Tucker go with you for the purpose of making a record?-
A. Yes, sir: and Mr. Terry and this old gentleman-I called his name a while ago
y. McKinney?-
A. Yes, sir; and they wouldn’t let us in the house.

By Mr. Bliss:

Q. When were you born?-
A. 1 was bred and born in the Territory.
Q. Around in this country?-
A. Yes, sir; In the Territory.
Q. Your father and mother were living here at that time?-
A. Yes, sir; and then they died and left me alone.
Q. Did yon ever live at any place outside of this Indian country?-
A. No, sir; nowhere else.
Q. Did you ever participate in any of the payments made by the tribal authorities of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations?-
A. No, sir; I never did get a thing.
y. You never drew any money?-
A. None.
Q. Did you ever attempt to draw any when they were making these payments?-
A. I made a claim, but I didn’t get anything.
Q. I was referring to the old tribal payments?-
A. No, sir.
Q. Did your husband ever draw any money from the Choctaw or Chickasaw Nation?-
A. No, sir.
y. Was your husband recognized as a citizen of the Choctaw or Chickasaw Nation?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. What degree of blood was he?-
A. One-half blood.
Q. Your husband?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Has he been dead a long time?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. You say you have four children living and three dead?-
A. Yes. sir; four daughters living and two sons and one daughter dead.
Q. Give me the names of your three deceased children.-
A. Andrew, Miller, and Maudy Coker.
Q. How long has Andrew Coker been dead?-
A. About 13 or 14 years.
Q. How long has Miller Coker been dead?-
A. About 16 years.
Q. How long has Mandy been dead?-
A. About 11 years.
Q. Now give me the names of your children who are living.-
A. Cusanna Tucker.
Q. What is her post-office address?-
A. Dow. Okla., No. 9.
Q. Give me the name of your next one.-
A. My oldest daughter is Emeline Cottonham.
Q. Where does she live?-
A. I can’t exactly say.
Q. I want her post-office address; you know that, don’t yon?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Well, what is it?-
A. Dow. And the next daughter is Mary Ann Smotherland.
Q. Where does she live?-
A. Somewhere In Alabama. And the next one is Hanar Davis.
Q. Where does she live?-
A. I can’t tell you. Cusanna lives in the house with me., or I live with her.
Q. You stated that neither you nor your husband nor your children to your knowledge have ever been recognized by the tribal authorities In any of the tribal payments; is that right?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Where were you living. Auntie, when they first began to make allotments of these lands?-
A. I have always lived in the Territory.
Q. Do you remember when they first began this work?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Had you made application before that time for enrollment?-
A. It has been six years.
Q. After you made that first application did they have a hearing any place?-
A. Yes, sir; I had a hearing from Washington often.
Q. I mean was the case heard as we are hearing this case this morning, and you were allowed to introduce testimony?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Where?-
A. In South Town; right here, before Mr. Lindley.
Q. Who was Mr. Lindley? –
A. That was a lawyer.
Q. I refer to an officer of the Government? –
A. Sir?
Q. Did you ever go before n Government officer and testify'; –
A. No, sir.
Q. Then, this is the first time you have ever testified before the Department of the Interior in regard to your claim? –
A. No, sir: I have been before them twice.
Q. I mean to testify as you are testifying this morning. Have you ever given testimony before the Department of the Interior before this morning? –
A. Yes, sir; before Mr. Lindley.
Q. Mr. Lindley wasn’t a representative of the Interior Department, was be? – A. He said he was. I paid him $10 to put it through.
Q. Did he tell you he was a representative of the Interior Department, or did be tell you he was representing you before the Interior Department? –
A. That is what he said he would do.

By Mr. Lindley:

Q. When you gave the name Cusanna Coker, did you mean Cusanna Tucker? –
A. Yes, sir.
Q. When you appeared before that Mr. Lindley, he was a lawyer, was he not?-
A. It has been about six years ago and I don’t remember much about It.
Q. Prior to that time you had secured the services of a lawyer at Muskogee or some other place., hadn’t you? –
A. No, sir; 1 just started in to see if I could get anything – I know I ought to have something and I haven’t got nothing
Q. Did Mr. Lindley draw up some papers for you? –
A. Yes, sir; and I signed them.

By Mr. McCurtain:

Q. Is this the gentleman that you went before – the Mr. Lindley – is this him here? –
A. I don’t know; I have been before so many of them I have got them all mixed up.

By Mr. Bliss:

Q. Have you any relatives who have had allotments made to them as citizens of the Choctaw or Chiekasaw Nation? –
A. I have got some old gentleman in there; he has got land allotted to him.
Q. What relation is he to you? –
A. He is a cousin of my husband.
Q. What is his name? –
A. I don’t remember the man’s name.
Q. He is the only one that you remember now who has been allotted land and who is related to you? –
A. Yes, sir.
Q. And you don’t remember his name? –
A. He don’t have a name like other folks, and I can’t think of it.

(Witness excused.)


Peter Benton, being first duly sworn, testified as follows through Mack McCurtain, sworn interpreter.

By Mr. Bliss:

Q. What is your name? –
A. Peter Benton.
Q. How old are you? –
A. About 56.
Q. What is your post-office address? –
A. Alderson.
Q. Are yon acquainted with this woman here? –
A. I have known her about two years.
Q. Are you related to her? –
A. No relation.
Q. You didn’t know her before they began the allotment of these lands? – A. 1 never did know her until about three years ago.

By Mr. Lindley:

Q. Did you know the McGees? –
A. I knew one of them. Humphrey McGee.
Q. Did you know his wife – what was the name of his wife? –
A. I saw him about once when I was a boy.
Q. Was Humphrey McGee an Indian? –
A. Part Choctaw and part Chickasaw.
Q. What was his wife? –
A. I suppose she was a white woman. I don’t think she talked the Choctaw. There use to be a good many McGees, and I use to see them when I was a boy.
Q. Are you sure that Humphrey McGee’s wife was a white woman? –
A. I don’t know for sure.
Q. Did you know any of the children? –
A. I didn’t know any of the children; I was young.
Q. What relation are you to Humphrey McGee?-
A. I was related to some of the McGees, but not to him.
Q. Any of the ones that you were related to-were any of them related to this family of McGees here?-
A. Yes; I was related to Alex McGee, who was the father of Humphrey.

Mr. McCurtain. We move to strike this testimony from the record for the reason that it is irrelevant, Incompetent, and immaterial and in no way connects the applicant with the McGees about which the witness testified.

(Objection noted.)

Mr. Lindley. I protest against the motion for the reason that the parties named by the applicant and the witness are the same persons and are shown to be Indians by blood and relatives of the witness.

(Witness excused.)


Peggie Coker, being recalled, testified as follows:

By Mr. Bliss:

Q. Is this the man you referred to. Peggie, as the man who is related to you and who has an allotment?-
A. Yes, sir. (Witness excused.)

Peter Benton, being recalled, testified as follows:

By Mr. Lindley:

Q. Are you enrolled and received an allotment?-
A. Yes, sir.
(Witness excused.)


Quinton Presley, being first duly sworn, testified as follows:

By Mr. Bliss:

Q. What is your name?-
A. Quinton Presley.
Q. How old are yon?-
A. I don’t know just exactly how old I am.
Q. What is your post-office address?-
A. South McAlester.
Q. About how old are you?-
A. I guess I am about 30 years old.
Q. What Is the name of your mother?-
A. Emeline Cottonham.
Q. What is the name of your father?-
A. Bill Cottonham.
Q. Are you acquainted with Peggie Coker?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. How long have you known her?-
A. Ever since I have been born.
Q. Peggie Coker is your grandmother?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Since you have known her has she lived continuously in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. What is your mother’s name?-
A. Emeline Cottonham.
Q. And she was Peggie Coker’s daughter?-
A. Yes sir; that’s what they say.
Q. Do you remember your mother?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. What degree of Indian blood do you claim?-
A. I don’t know whether I claim any but both my mother and grandmother is Indian.
Q. Any Indian blood that you may have would come through your mother and your grandmother. Peggie Coker?-
A. Yes. sir.

By Mr. Lindley:

Q. Have you any children?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Give the name of the oldest one.-
A. Dan Presley.
Q. How old is he?-
A. About 17.
Q. What is the name of the next one?-
A. Julius Presley.
Q. How old is he?-
A. About 15.
Q. What is the name of the next one?-
A. Willie May, a girl.
Q. How old is she?-
A. Fourteen years old.
Q. Do they all live with you?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. In McAlester?-
A. Yes. sir.
Q. How long have you lived In McAlester?-
A. I have been here for 19 years.
Q. How long have you been in the Territory?-
A. All my life-I go to Texas sometimes on a visit.

By Mr. McCurtain:

Q. Your mother living?-
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Where does she live?-
A. Somewhere near Wildcat. I don’t know exactly the post office.
Q. You didn’t know anything about having a claim to Indian rights until your grandmother made this application?-
A. No, sir.
Q. When did you first hear about that? – A. Well, it was long in 1907 I was Informed.
Q. That was the first you heard about it? –
A. Yes, sir; but I didn’t know how to get up to the matter.
Q. Is your father living? –
A. No, sir; he is dead.
Q. Was your father a white man? –
A. Yes, sir; a white man.
Q. Are you married now? –
A. Yes. sir.
Q. What is the name of your husband? –
A. Turner Presley.
Q. Is he a white man? –
A. No. sir; mixed.
Q. Mixed with what? –
A. I don’t know: he is pretty dark.
Q. Is he part colored man? –
A. I don’t know whether he Is or not.

By Mr. Lindley:

Q. Yon desire to have your application for enrollment considered, do yon?
A. Yes. sir.

By Mr. Bliss:

Q. You have known ever since you were old enough to understand that Peggie Coker was your grandmother? –
A. Yes. sir.

Q. You were told that you had Indian blood? –
A. Yes, sir.
Q. When were yon told? –
A. I don’t know; It was some years ago, twit I didn’t know there was any chance for me to get an allotment.
Q. Were you ever recognized In any way by the tribal authorities? –
A. No, sir.
Q. Did you ever draw any money? –
A. No. sir.
Q. Did your mother? –
A. No. sir; not to my knowledge.

(Witness excused.)


Cusanna Tucker, being first duly sworn, testified as follows:

By Mr. Lindley:

Q. State your name. –
A. Cusanna Tucker.
Q. Yon gave testimony In this case last Friday, the 9th? –
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Yon were representing your mother at that time? –
A. Yes. sir.
Q. Have you heretofore represented her in citizenship matters? –
A. Yes, sir.
Q. State whether you were with her before M. M. Lindley an attorney of South McAlester. –
A. Yes, sir.
Q. State what was your purpose in appearing at his office. –
A. I was told that Mr. Lindley was working for the Government or was recognized as a Government lawyer, and it has been about six years ago. I made some testimony to him.
Q. Did you simply employ him as an attorney to go before the Dawes Commission and secure a hearing? –
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Isn’t that all you done with Mr. Lindley, make some affidavits and testimony and arrangements for him to take the case before the Dawes Commission? –
A. Yes, sir.
Q. Who stated to you that he was a Government attorney? –
A. Some person in his office, but I disremember who it was. He had a diploma hanging there in his office.
Q. Mr. Lindley didn’t claim to be a Government attorney, did he? –
A. I don’t know what he did say he was.
Q. You just employed and made a contract with him to represent your case before the Dawes Commission? –
A. Yes, sir.

(Witness excused.)


Mr. Buss. Mr. Lindley, you will furnish the letters referred to by Peggie Coker, will you?

Mr. Lindley I will furnish all but one. The last notice they had to appear was on December 9, and this was turned over to Judge Pollock.

Vester W. Rose, being first duly sworn, states that the above and foregoing is a correct and complete transcript of his stenographic notes taken in the above matter on the date therein mentioned.

Vester W. Rose.

Subscribed and sworn to before me this the 24th day of December 1910.

R. P. Harrison,
Clerk United States Court
By A. G. McMillan, Deputy.


Article printed from Access Genealogy: http://www.accessgenealogy.com

URL to article: http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/peggy-coker-choctaw.htm

Copyright © 2013 Access Genealogy (http://www.accessgenealogy.com/). All rights reserved.