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Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements of Washington

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In Native American,Washington | No Comments

These pages will provide an alphabetical listing for all the villages, towns, and settlements in what was the state of Washington at the time the Handbook of American Indian of North America was written.

  • Ahchawat. A summer village of the Makah at C. Flattery, Wash. Swan in Smithson. Cont., XVI, 6, 1870.
  • Almotu. A Paloos village on the North bank of Snake River, about 30 in. above the mouth of Palouse River, Washington. Mooney in 14th Rep. B. A. R, 735, 1896.
  • Atsmitl (Chihalis name for Shoalwater bay) . Chinookan divisions living around Shoal water bay, Washington. Boas, field notes.
  • Baada. A former Makah village on Neah bay, Wash. According to Swan it was abandoned in 1863, its inhabitants moving to Neah.
  • Chiklisilkh. A Lower Chehalis settlement at Point Leadbetter, the North end of the land tongue at Shoalwater Bay, Washington. Gibbs, Chinook vocab., B. A. E., 23.
  • Chimnapum. A small Shahaptian tribe located by Lewis and Clark in 1805 on the North West side of Columbia River near the mouth of the Snake, and on lower Yakima River, Washington. They speak a dialect closely allied to the Paloos. By Lewis and Clark their population was estimated at 1,860, in 42 lodges. A remnant of the tribe is still living on the west side of Columbia River, opposite Pasco, Washington. (L. F.)
  • Chippanchickchick. A tribe or band of doubtful linguistic affinity, either Chinookan or Shahaptian, living in 1812 on Columbia River, in Klickitat County, Washington, nearly opposite The Dalles. Their number was estimated at 600.
  • Chinook. The principal village of the Chinook, situated on Baker Bay, Pacific County, Washington, near the mouth of Columbia River.
  • Chobaabish. A small band of Salish, subordinate to Skagit, on Swinomish Reservation, Washington; mentioned in Pt Elliott treaty of 1855; pop. 38 in 1870.
  • Chooahlitsh. A former Samish settlement in the canoe passage East of Hidalgo Island, Northwest Washington
  • Cloquallum. A former subdivision and village of the Upper Chehalis on a river of the same name in west Washington.
  • Copalis. A division of Salish on Chepalis River, 18 miles north of Grays Harbor, Washington. Lewis and Clark estimated their number at 200, in 10 houses, in 1805.
  • Deep Creek Spokan. A former Spokan colony that lived 17 miles southwest of Spokane Falls, now Spokane, Washington. The colony was established for farming purposes; population about 30 in 1880. Warner in Ind. Aff. Rep., 67, 1880.
  • Dugh-sokum. Given as the name of a tribe (Mallet in Ind. Aff. Rep., 198, 1877), but really that of the place where Port Madison, Washington, now stands. (Boulet in letter, Mar. 22, 1886).
  • Elwha. A Clallam village at the mouth of the river of the same name in Washington.
  • Eneeshur. Shahaptian bands aggregating 1,200 population in 41 mat lodges, found by Lewis and Clark in 1805 on both sides of Columbia River near the mouth of the Deschutes, in Washington. The term probably refers more specifically to the Tapanash. (L. F.)
  • Etakmehu. A division of Salish now on Port Madison Reservation, Washington.
  • Gitlapshoi (‘grassland people’). A division of the Chinook tribe living at Sealand, Pacific County, Wash.
  • Hoh. A band of the Quileute living at the mouth of Hoh River, about 15 miles south of Lapush, the main seat of the tribe on the west coast of Washington. They are under the jurisdiction of the Neah Bay Agency. Pop. 62 in 1905. (L. F.)
  • Hoko. A Clallam village on Okeho River, Washington. Under the name Okeno its inhabitants participated in the treaty of Point No Point, Washington, in 1855.
  • Hooshkal (Hoosh-kal). A former Chehalis village on the north shore of Grays Harbor, Washington. Gibbs, MS., no. 248, B. A. E.
  • Hoquiam. A Chehalis village on a creek of the same name, n. shore of Grays harbor, Washington.
  • Huiauulch. A Clallam village, the modern Jamestown, 5 miles east of Dungeness, Puget Sound, Washington.
  • Humptulips (said to mean chilly region). A body of Chehalis on a river of the same name emptying into Chehalis River, Washington. They are under the supervision of the Puyallup school superintendent and numbered 21 in 1904.
  • Hunnint. A Clallam village in northwest Washington which participated in the treaty of Point No Point, Washington, in 1855. U. S. Ind. Treat., 800, 1873.

Hutatchl (

Hut-tát-ch’l

    ). A former Lummi village at the s. e. end of Orcas id. of the San Juan group, Wash.

  • Inaspetsum. One of the tribes included by the early fur traders under he term Nez Perce (Ross, Fur Hunters, i, 185, 1855). They lived on Columbia r., above the mouth of the Snake, in Washington. Perhaps they were the Winatshipum or the Kalispel. (L. F.)
  • Ispipewhumaugh. One of the tribes included by the early fur traders under the term Nez Percé (Ross, Fur Hunters, i, 185, 1855). They lived on Columbia r., above the mouth of Snake r., Wash. They were possibly of Shahaptian stock, but are not otherwise identifiable.
  • Ithkyemamits. A tribe or band of doubtful linguistic affinity, either Chinookan or Shahaptian, living in 1812 on Columbia r . in Klickitat co., Wash., nearly opposite The Dalles. Their number was estimated at 600.

 


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