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Cayuga Tribe

Posted By Dennis Partridge On In Native American,New York | No Comments

Cayuga Indians (Kwĕñio’gwĕb;, the place where locusts were taken out–Hewitt). A tribe of the Iroquoian confederation, formerly occupying the shores of Cayuga Lake, New York. Its local council was composed of 4 clan phratries, and this form became the pattern, tradition says; of that of the confederation of the Five Nations of the Iroquois, in which the Cayuga had 10 delegates.  In 1660 they were estimated to number 1,500 and in 1778, 1,100.  At the beginning of the American Revolution a large part of the tribe removed to Canada and never returned, while the rest were scattered among the other tribes of the confederacy.

Soon after the Revolution these latter sold their lands in New York; some went to Ohio, where they joined other Iroquois and became known as the Seneca of the Sandusky.  These are now in Indian Territory; others are with the Oneida in Wisconsin; 175 are with the Iroquois still in New York, while the majority, numbering 700-800, are on the Grand River Reservation, Ontario.  In 1670 they had three villages, Goiogouen, Tiohero, and Onnontare. Goiogouen was the principal village; Gayagaanha, given by Morgan, was their chief village in modern times.  Their other villages of the modern period according to Morgan, were Ganogeh, Gewauga, and Neodakheat.  Others were Chonodote, Gandaseteigon, Kawauka, Kente, Oneniote and Onyadeakahyat.  Their clans were those common to the Iroquois.


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