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Biography of Alfred A. Plummer, Sr.

ALFRED A. PLUMMER, Sr. – This pioneer of the port of entry was born at Alfred, Maine, March 3, 1822. He was the son of John and Eliza Adams Plummer, of an old family of the Pine Tree state. In early life young Plummer removed to Boston and learned the saddlery and harness trade, thereby acquiring practical ideas, and the facile use of his hands, which fitted him for the varied work of the pioneer on our coat. In 1849 he left for the Pacific shores, coming with the argonauts who steered their way across the seas of grass, and the deserts of the West, – one of those hardy, keen characters that find a world of resources within their own hearts and minds sufficient for any demand to be made upon a human being; and he most fully justified this confidence in his after career. At San Francisco he engaged for a time in the hotel business, but, feeling the drift of destiny still farther up the coast, boarded in 1850 the brig Emory, Captain Balch, and arrived in the Strait April 24th. The present site of the Port was then wholly uninhabited; but, seeing its great natural advantages as the first really practicable landing at the entrance of the Sound waters, he laid there his Donation claim, and with Charles Batchelder became the first settler of the place. His little clearing and log cabin on the hill long remained to tell the tale of his early labors and solitary exertions. In 1853 his home ties were strengthened by his marriage to Miss Anna Hill, a most amiable...

Biographical Sketch of Charles William Burrows

Burrows, Charles William; born, Hollis, York County, Me., Dec. 21, 1849; son of Joseph W. and Mary Elizabeth Atkinson Burrows; graduated, Ti. S. Military Academy, 1870; served as 2d Lt., 34 U. S. Art, 1870-1872; married, Lottie Thomas Mott, of Norwalk, Conn., Feb. 26, 1884; started, November, 1873, firm of Burrows Bros. (now The Burrows Bros. Co.), publishers and booksellers; Republican, member Ass’n of Graduates of U. S. Military Academy; Cleveland Chamber of Commerce, Soc. Colonial Wars. Clubs: Union, Euclid, Hermit, Athletic. Identified with movement to procure one-cent letter...

Biographical Sketch of A. J. Sanborn

A. J. Sanborn, master mechanic, I. & St. L. Shops, Mattoon; was born in Acton, York Co., Me., in 1826; having lost his mother when but 11 years of age, he left home, and, making his way to Boston, went on board a vessel, and was absent two years on a voyage; after coming into port, he made known to his father and family his adventures for the two years past; he served seven years on the sea, sailing as second mate on board the ship Vesta, of Boston, and the brig Yucatan, in the South American trade; at the age of 21 years, he began his trade in the Lowell Machine-Shops, at Lowell, Mass; here he remained two years; he next went to Boston and worked in the locomotive-shops of Hinckley & Drury for eighteen months; thence to Lawrence, Mass.; to the Essex shops, one year; in 1858, or 1859, he came west to East St. Louis, and took charge of the erecting department of the O. & M. R. R; in 1867, he took charge of the machinery on the Vandalia R. R., and, in 1873, he took charge of the works for the I. & St. L. R. R. at Mattoon; Mr. Sanborn is truly a self-made man; his education has been derived in the school of experience, and, whatever he undertakes to perform, he executes with an experienced and skillful...

Biographical Sketch of L. F. Morse, M. D.

L. F. Morse, M. D., physician and surgeon, Mattoon; was born in Canterbury, N.Y. Feb. 5, 1839; his father was a farmer, and his early life was that of a farmer’s son; at the age of 14, he went to live with an uncle; in the winter of 1860, he began the study of medicine, under the supervision of Dr. L. T. Weeks, of Canterbury; after an extended course of reading, he attended a course of lectures in the Burlington Medical College, at Burlington, Vt.; in June, 1862, he was engaged in the Government hospital at Washington, as Contract Surgeon; here he remained one year; in 1863, he attended a course of lectures in Dartmouth Medical College from which he graduated in November, 1863; he then entered the U. S. Navy, as Assistant Surgeon, and was stationed on the west coast Of Florida; Dec. 7, 1865, he was discharged from the U. S. service; he next attended a course of lectures in the Homeopathic College of New York, from which he graduated in March, 1866; he first located in Biddeford, Me., and entered upon the practice of his profession; in September, 1867, he came West to see, and located in Pekin, Tazewell Co.; in May, 1868, he came to Mattoon, his present residence. He was married April 14, 1869, to Harriet F. Chamberlain, a native of Indiana; has three children – Helen L., Bertha L. and Clifford L. Mr. M. at present holds the office of School Director, and is Secretary of the...

Biography of Luther C. Tibbets

Luther C. Tibbets was born in South Berwick, York County, Maine, June 26, 1820. His father, James Tibbets, was a native of the same State and a farmer by occupation. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools and reared a farmer until seventeen years of age. He then located in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, first engaging as a clerk in mercantile houses, and later established a general merchandise store at Great Falls, New Hampshire, which enterprise he conducted until 1844, when be sold out the establishment to his brother. It is worthy of mention that the mercantile house he established nearly half a century ago is still in existence, conducted by his brother and descendants, under the firm name of E. A. Tibbets & Son. Mr. Tibbets continued his mercantile pursuits, establishing himself in Portsmouth, and later transferring the scene of his operations to Boston, Massachusetts, where he opened a wholesale grocery business. He remained there until 1852, and then seeking a broader field of operations located in New York. The next ten years were spent in a large wholesale grocery business. In 1862 he entered into produce and grain dealing, and became one of the heaviest grain operators in the city. At that time the war was in active prosecution; bread-stuffs and cereals were being “cornered,” and the Government as well as other consumers was a special mark for the greed of the speculators. Mr. Tibbets declined to enter into “rings,” and especially did lie decline to combine against his country in meeting the provision supply for her immense armies. This excited the enmity of...

Biography of Arthur C. Wentworth

ARTHUR C. WENTWORTH, treasurer of the Springfield Cooperative Bank, was born in South Berwick, Maine, November 13, 1871. His father was Charles K. Wentworth and his mother Ellen M. (Plumer) Wentworth. His father was born on a farm at Berwick, Maine, in April, 1836, and followed farming for a number of years, afterwards living in South Berwick until his death in November, 1906. His mother was born in January, 1841, at South Berwick, Maine, and died in May, 1924. The Wentworth family derives its name from the lordship of Wentworth in the wapentake of Stafford, County of York, England, where lived Reginald de Winterwode at the time of the Conquest. Genealogists agree that the word is of Saxon origin, meaning white farm or court, taking its style from the soil composed of chalk or whitish clay. William Wentworth was baptized in the parish of Alford near the city of Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England, March 15, 1616, and is believed upon the evidence to be identical with Elder William Wentworth, the first of the Wentworths of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was from the same parish in England as the Rev. John Wheelwright, who came to this country in 1636. He was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1637 on account of a sermon he preached in Boston, and settled with a company of followers at Piscataqua Falls, New Hampshire, who called their town Exeter; William Wentworth was one of the company. When the jurisdiction of Massachusetts was extended to include Exeter, Wheelwright and many of the colonists moved to Wells, Maine. William Wentworth appears to have lived in Wells...

Biography of Joseph Reed Burgess

JOSEPH REED BURGESS. Superintendent of schools of Monson, is one of the best known educators of Hampden County and Western Massachusetts. A man of wide education and excellent knowledge of his profession, he has held innumerable responsible and important pedagogical positions in the county, the State, and in Maine, and he is now one of the most highly esteemed members of the teaching profession. He is an active citizen and club and fraternal man of the town and county and is generally recognized as a leader of the pedagogical fraternity. Joseph Reed Burgess was born in Rockland, May 21, 1893, the son of Horatio B. Burgess, a sole leather buyer, who successively held the posts of chief of fire department and chief of police department in Rockland, and Georgianna Burgess. Joseph Reed Burgess was educated in the public schools of his native town, in the Rockland High School and he took his pedagogical studies in the Bridgewater Normal School, going through all the courses, including the advanced normal subjects. He completed his education in Harvard University. He had been teaching school but a short time when he was appointed principal of the Eastham Grammar School at Eastham, where he remained several years. He then became principal of the Longfellow and Emerson schools at Sanford, Maine, after which he was principal of the Sawyer School, in Gloucester. Massachusetts. His next position was that of assistant superintendent of schools of the Agawam and Ludlow districts, of Hampden County, and soon after he resigned to become superintendent of schools of Monson, Hampden County. Mr. Burgess is a member of the John Cutler...

Accominta Tribe

Accominta Indians (possibly related to the Chippewa ä‛ku‛kŭmiga‛k, a locative expression referring to the place where land and water meet, hence, specifically, shore, shore-line – Wm. Jones.)  The name was given by the Indians to York River. A small tribe or band of the Pennacook confederacy, commonly called Agamenticus or Accominticus, that occupied a village of the same name at or near the site of the present York, York County, Maine, to which the name “Boston” was given on some early maps. Capt. John Smith1 says that the people of this place were allied to those immediately North of them, and were subject to the bashabees of Penobscot, which would seem to place them in the Abnaki confederacy, though they are now generally and apparently correctly included in the Pennacook confederacy. Schoolcraft2 includes this area in the Pennacook dominion. Under what name the Accominta people were subsequently recognized is not known. (James Mooney, Cyrus Thomas)FootnotesSmith, Virginia, II, 183, repr. 1819 ↩Schoolcraft, Ind. Tribes, v, 222,...

Biography of Philemon L. Mitchell

In recalling to mind those men who in an early day laid the foundation of Rock Island’s present commercial and financial stability, one’s memory instinctively turns to an individual who, during his lifetime, was instrumental in organizing and conducting one of the largest banking houses in Rock Island County, and who was a tower of moral and financial strength in the community, Philemon L. Mitchell, deceased. He was born October 16, 1812, at Limington, Maine, and died at his home in Rock Island January 23, 1895. His parents were Isaac and Martha (Libby) Mitchell. The father was a native of Maine and the mother of Ire-land, she having come to America with her parents in her early childhood. To this couple seven children were born, four sons and three daughters. The parents spent their lives in the City of Limington, where their family was born and reared, the father dying in that city January 26, 1853, at the age of eighty-two years. The death of the mother occurred in the same city January 3, 1877, she having attained the extreme age of ninety-four years. Philemon L. Mitchell spent his early boy-hood in Limington, his school days being limited to a short attendance in that city’s public schools. But his education was not in any sense a limited one on that account, for he was throughout his life a student of men and books. At the age of thirteen years he found it necessary to face the world for himself and earn his own livlihood. Although obliged so early in life to ‘participate in its grim struggle, he was imbued...

Biography of Clement Adams Bradbury

CLEMENT ADAMS BRADBURY. – Of all the romantic and adventurous ways in which the early settlers found their way to Oregon, this now venerable pioneer may perhaps claim a manner as exciting as any, – that of a world-wide career on the ocean, and, finally, shipwreck. He was born in York county, Maine, March 18, 1819. As a boy he learned to labor, belonging to one of those hardy New England families whose lot was cast in a forest country, and in hard times. But by this very discipline young Clement acquired strength of body and of mind, independence, self-reliance and energy. At the age of thirteen he went to a new home in Aroostook county, in the midst of the deep pine woods. At the age of twenty-five, – now a brawny, fearless, and ambitious young man, – he went to sea, following the example of the many wonderfully hardy young New Englanders, who learned how to chase the sea monsters at either of the Polar circles. Off on a whaler he went to the South seas, fishing on the St. Paul ground. Crossing the equator and dipping in the northern waters, he was at Petropaulovski, and down to the station at the Sandwich Islands. The ship also went down to Syndey in Australia; and here, in company with another young man, Bradbury left the whaler, passing some time on the great Southern island and encountering a host of serious and comic adventures. Shipping however on another whaler, he took a second cruise north, arriving in Behring Sea some time in June, when all those Arctic waters were...
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