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Wakefield Genealogy of Narraguagus Valley Maine

Samuel Wakefield and his wife Mary Burbank, came from Kennebunk in 1756 or 57, and settled at the head of the bay on the lot now comprising a considerable part of Steuben village. Their children were Samuel, Lydia, Ruth, Benjamin, Phebe, Hannah and Sally. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Wakefield m. a widow Small, and their children were James, Myriam and Daniel.

Bean and Bane Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Tradition makes the ancestor of this family who first came to our shores a native of the Isle of Jersey, but I doubt the truth of the statement. I have not found the name, or one resembling it, in any record or book relating to Jersey. The surname Bain, and Bane, are derived from the Gaelic word bane which signified white or fair complexion, as Donald Bane, who usurped the Scottish throne after the death of his brother, Malcolm Canmore. An ancient branch of the family in Fifeshire, Scotland, have spelled the surname Bayne. The Highland MacBanes were a branch of the Macintosh clan, and their distinctive badge was the red whortleberry. Maj. Gillies MacBane, chief of the clan in 1745, was a man of giant stature, being six feet four and a half inches in height. He brought a hundred MacBanes into the field, and at the battle of Culloden, being beset by a squad of government troops, he placed his back against a wall, and, though wounded in several places, fought with such desperation that he laid thirteen of his assailants dead at his feet. An officer called to “save that brave man,” but they cut him down. His widow is said to have composed the pathetic lament in Gaelic, entitled mo run geal oig, or. The following lines were found in a work called “The Gael”: “With thy back to the wall, and thy breast to the targe, Full Hashed thy claymore in the face of their charge, The blood of the boldest that barren turf stain. But alas! thine is reddest there, Gillies MacBane! Hewn...

Barrons Family Genealogy of Cornish Maine

Abraham Barrons, b. January 17, 1756, probably in Wells, Me., came to Cornish about the time of leaving the Revolutionary army, say, 1778. I find the name of Abram Barnes in a list of soldiers from Wells, and think the two identical. He m. Margaret Stackpole (who was b. Nov. 12, 1755) and d. Oct. 24, 1819, aged 63. Wife d. May 22, 1846, aged 91. These had nine children named as follows: Lydia Barrons, b. Jan. 22, 1779; d. Jan. 23, 1830. Abigail Barrons, b. May 23, 1782; d. 1800. Polly Barrons, b. Aug. 4, 1784; d. Oct. 12, 1863. Sally Barrons, b. Aug. 26, 1786; d. July 31, 1845. Henry W. Barrons, b. Sept. 9, 1788; d. Feb. 9, 1860. Abraham Barrons, b. Oct. 29, 1791; m. Jane Estes, of Cornish (b. Mar. 26, 1799,), and d. Jan. 23, 1867. She d. Aug. 3, 1865. He spelled the name “Barrons.” Twelve children as follows: Sarah Barrons, b. Aug. 13, 1815. Eli Barrons, b. Nov. 20, 1816; d. Oct. 25, 1854. He m. Cynthia, dau. of Noah Rendall, of Limington, sister of Noah, 2d, Nov. 12, 1845. He d. Oct. 25, 1854. She d. Nov. 26, 1893. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Barnes lived at Moderation and there brought up her little son. She was skillful as a seamstress and a worthy woman, respected by all. She lived to see her son become a successful man of business, who with proper filial attention cared for her in her feeble years. Children: John H. Barrons, b. Aug. 25, 1847; d. Jan. 16, 1848. Almon H. Barrons, b....

Ayer Family Genealogy of Buxton Maine

The ancestors of the Ayer families in the state, were early settled at Haverhill, Mass., and from that town came the Ayers of Biddeford and Buxton. John was at Salisbury, 1640; at Ipswich, 1648; died at Haverhill, 1657, leaving numerous descendants. Peter Ayer was admitted freeman at Haverhill, 1666; chosen representative, 1683-85-89-90. Robert and Thomas were admitted freemen at Haverhill, 1668. Maj. Ebenezer Ayer was with Arnold in the Canada expedition through the wilderness of Maine, and displayed consummate courage and great determination. He is said to have sawed off the pickets upon the enemy’s breastworks to enable the soldiers to scale the walls. He afterwards served in the engineer department with rank of major. I suppose he settled in Buxton. Peter Ayer was in Capt. John Lane’s company, in 1756; also Philip Ayer, who served as corporal; both were designated “of Haverhill.” Moses Ayer, b. Mar. 17, 1757; m. Mary, b. Aug. 10, 1759, and had children, named as follows, born in Saco: Elizabeth Ayer, b. May 27, 1782. John Ayer, b. Sept. 27, 1783. Sarah Ayer, b. Oct. 23, 1786. Hannah Ayer, b. Oct. 13, 1791. Abigail Ayer, b. June 13, 1793. Andrew Ayer, b. Mar. 18, 1795. Moses Ayer, b. Feb. 9, 1797. Tristram Ayer, b. Feb. 19, 1799. I suppose it was this man who married Frances, and had children, born in Buxton, named as follows: Mary A. Ayer, b. Sept. 19, 1821. William Ayer, b. Mar. 4, 1824. Sarah E. Ayer, b. Sept. 11, 1826. John L. Ayer, b. June 17, 1829. Maria G. Ayer, b. Feb. 2, 1833. Lyman G. Ayer, b. Dec....

Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the first Theodore, b. in Boston in 1636, m. Sarah Myrick, Apr. 27, 1664, and lived on the side of the “Upper Green,” in Newburyport, Mass. His son, John Atkinson, m. Sarah Woodman, in 1693, and had Thomas, b. Mar. 16, 1694, who m. Mary Pike, of Salisbury, Aug. 5, 17 19. He was the father of: Humphrey Atkinson, b. June 12, 1720; m. Sarah Hale, of Newburyport, May 25, 1743, and lived in that town until 1760, when he came to Buxton. He had purchased land in the township previously; was a shipwright. He d. in 1775, and with his wife was buried at Pleasant Point. Children named as follows, being born in Newbury: Sarah Atkinson, b. June 25, 1744; m. Jabez Bradbury. Joseph Atkinson, b. Aug. 24, 1745; m. Olive, dau. of Capt. Joseph Woodman, Dec. 18, 1767, and in 1769 his father conveyed to him forty acres of land, upon which he settled and died. He was deacon of the Baptist church. He and his brother m....

York County Maine Registry of Deeds 1642-1737

At a meeting of the Maine Historical Society, held in Portland on the 23d of December, 1882, a communication was received from Mr. John T. Hull, proposing to publish the early volumes in the York registry of deeds and asking for the cooperation of the society. Messrs. Edward H. Elwell, James P. Baxter and William Goold were thereupon appointed a committee to present the matter to the legislature of Maine. The fruition of their collaboration are the following 20 volumes of York County Maine Registry of Deeds.

King William’s War – Indian Wars

The war commonly called by the colonists, “King William’s War,” commenced in 1688 and ended in 1697. The object of the French was the expulsion of the English from the northern and middle provinces. The English directed their efforts against Canada. The French secured the services of the greater part of the Indians, and the united forces spread death and desolation in all directions.

Biography of John W. Staples, M.D.

John W. Staples, M.D., a prominent physician of Franklin Falls, N.H., and a native of Wells, Me., was born January 25, 1855. His parents, John and Ann (Wells) Staples, also natives of Wells, belonged to families that had lived in that town for a number of generations. John Staples, who was a farmer, spent his life in the place of his birth, and died in 1879. His wife had died in 1877. They had four children, one of whom died in infancy. The others were: Albert, who died when nine years old; Moses, a farmer in Wells; and John W., the subject of this article. John W. Staples received his early education by attending the district schools in the winter season. In the summer he worked on the farm. He afterward went for two terms to private schools; and when fifteen years old he entered South Berwick Academy in Maine, graduating in the class of 1872. On leaving the academy, he became a student of Dartmouth College, and there graduated in 1876. 1880, receiving his degree when twenty-five years old. In that year he began practice in Franklin Falls, where he has since been located. He has also an office in Tilton, N.H. The Doctor was married January 25, 1882, to Miss Martha L. Kimball, daughter of Ezra S. and Elizabeth (Colburn) Kimball, both of Haverhill, N.H. They have one child-Charles Wells, born August 29, 1884, who is at home. Dr. Staples has an excellent practice in the village, and sufficient patients in Tilton to occupy about two or three hours each day. He has been a member of...

Biographical Sketch of Allen, Stillman Boyd

Allen, Stillman Boyd, son of Horace O. and Elizabeth Allen, was born September 8, 1830, at Waterborough, New county, Maine. He received his education in the academies at North Yarmouth, Kennebunk and Alfred, Maine. In September 1853, he was admitted to the bar, and practiced law in Maine until May, 1861, when he removed to Boston, and two years later became associated with the Hon. John D. Long, who subsequently retired from the firm upon his election as governor of the State. He is now the senior member of the law fir of Allen, Long & Hemenway (Governor Long since his retirement from congressional life having resumed his former relations). Mr. Allen has been largely engaged in jury trials, and has the reputation of winning for his clients the largest verdicts against railroads and other corporations ever rendered in this country. Mr. Allen was married at Kittery, Maine, September 7, 1854, to Harriet S., daughter of Joseph and Mary Seaward. Their children are: Willis Boyd Allen, who was a partner in his father’s firm for six years and has since been engaged in literary pursuits, and Marion Boyd Allen. In 1876-’77 Mr. Allen represented the city of Boston in the House of Representatives, serving the first year upon the judiciary committee. The following year he was chairman of the committee on probate and chancery. In 1877 he conducted an examination, made by the Legislature in to alleged abuses existing in the state reform school, which resulted in an entire change in the management of that institution. For three years Mr. Allen was president of the Mercantile Library Association of...

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