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Biography of William H. Stufflebeam

There is not a more popular man in Idaho either as Elk or “landlord” than William Herman Stufflebeam, proprietor of the Blackfoot Hotel, at Blackfoot; there is not a man better liked on purely personal grounds; and there is not a man to whom the citizens of Idaho would more confidently entrust the unraveling of a difficult problem or the settlement of important monetary interests than to Mr. Stufflebeam, who is a business man of careful and comprehensive training. William Herman Stufflebeam was born at Whitehall, Washington county, New York. His paternal great-grandfather and his grandfather fought together in the patriot cause during the Revolutionary struggle, the former as captain and the latter as private in his father’s company. After peace and American independence were established, these two patriot soldiers became prosperous farmers in Hudson County, New York, and upon the death of the father the old homestead descended to the son. William G. Stufflebeam, father of the subject of this review, was born in 1834 and married Miss Olive Mosher, a native of Washington County. He was long superintendent of the New York & Lake Champlain Transportation Company. In 1883, in company with his son, William Herman Stufflebeam, he came west on a prospecting tour, and bought a stock ranch twenty-five miles south of Blackfoot. In 1884 his wife and their other children came out from New York state and the family was reunited on this place, which comprises twelve hundred acres and is regarded as one of the fine stock ranches of Idaho. Mr. and Mrs. Stufflebeam had four children, all of whom are living: William Herman,...

Martha Collins Todd Hill

HILL, Martha Collins Todd7, (John6, Timothy5, Timothy4, Jonathan3, John2, Christopher1) born April 1, 1831, marricd March 11, 1857, Rev. Charles Jenkins Hill, who graduated from Williams College, and Andover Theological Seminary. He was a congregational clergyman and held pastorates at Nashua, N. H., Whiteall and Gloversville, N. Y., Ansonia, Middletown and Stonington, Conn. Children: I. Annie Williams, b. March 23, 1858, m. (???) Harper. II. John Todd, b. April 16, 1863, m. Grace(???). III. Miriam, b. Oct. 23,...

Biographical Sketch of John B. Jones

John B. Jones, farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. Rardin; born in Franklin Co., N. Y., Sept. 1, 1829; he removed with his parents when quite young to Whitehall, Washington Co., where he attended school and engaged in farming until 15 years of age, when he learned and worked at the ship-carpenter’s trade for three years; then for two years followed sailing on the lakes, and his trade; after which time he located at Astoria, L. I., where he engaged at his trade until 1857, when he emigrated to Illinois, and located in Ashmore Tp., Coles Co., March 1, of the same year; here he purchased land and engaged in farming until 1870, when he located upon his present place, where he has since continued to live, and where he has eighty-nine acres, upon which he erected his residence in 1871; here he located in the timber and has, during the last eight years, cleared and placed under cultivation upward of fifty acres of land by his own hard labor. His marriage with Sarah Smith was celebrated Dee. 24, 1856; she was born in Queens Co., N. Y., May 13, 1839; they have three children now living by this union, viz., John Paul, born Nov. 8, 1857; Stephen B., born Feb. 8, 1865, and Isaac P., born May 11, 1868; the names of the deceased are George W. and William...

From Albany to Saratoga along the Hudson River

A pleasant tour awaits the traveler who continues his journey north from Albany, where the Delaware and Hudson train for Saratoga is ready at the landing on the arrival of the steamer. A half hour’s run along the west bank gives us a glimpse of Troy across the river with the classical named hills Mount Ida and Mount Olympus. Two streams, the Poestenkill and the Wynant’s Kill, approach the river on the east bank through narrow ravines, and furnish excellent water power. In the year 1786 it was called Ferryhook. In 1787, Rensselaerwyck. In the fall of 1787 the settlers began to use the name of Vanderheyden, after the family who owned a great part of the ground where the city now stands. January 9, 1789 the freeholders of the town met and gave it the name of Troy. The “Hudson,” the “Erie,” and the “Champlain” Canals have contributed to its growth. The city, with many busy towns, which have sprung up around it¬óCohoes, Lansingburg, Waterford, etc., is central to a population of at least 100,000 people. The Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the oldest engineering school in America, has a national reputation. Cohoes, where the Mohawk joins Cohoes, comes from an Indian origin and signifies “the island at the falls.” This was the division line between the Mahicans and the Mohawks, and when the water is in full force it suggests in graceful curve and sweep a miniature Niagara. The view from the double-truss iron bridge (960 feet in length), looking up or down the Mohawk, is impressive. Passing through Waterford, and Mechanicville which lies partly in the township of...

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