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Hubbard Genealogy

George Hubbard George1 Hubbard was first in Watertown, Mass., about 1633; m. Mary Bishop, who d. at Guilford, Conn., Sept. 14, 1675. She was dau. of John and Ann Bishop, who moved to Guilford in 1639, where he, Bishop, was one of the seven prop. of the town, and d. there, February, 1661. On May 6, 1635, permission from the General Court of Massachusetts was granted to the inhabitants of Watertown “to remove themselves to any place they shall think meet to make choice of, provided they still continue under the government.” Among these immigrators was George Hubbard and family and his father-in-law, John Bishop and family. George Hubbard was the representative of Wethersfield, Conn., at the first Colonial General Court, under the Constitution of 1639. He went from Wethersfield and settled at Milford on Long Island, “being assigned Milford Island as his grant. He was one of those persons whose names are hereunto written-who are allowed to be free planters, having for the present, liberty to act in the choice of public officers for the carrying on of public affairs in this plantation. Mr. George Hubbard came from Wethersfield.” Before 1650 he sold Milford Island to Richard Bryan, and moved with his son-in-law John Fowler to Guilford, where his wife’s parents, John and Ann Bishop, had become residents. George Hubbard was admitted to church membership in Guilford, Oct. 6, 1650. During years 1652-55-57-58-60-62-65-66-67 he was deputy magistrate. In 1666-67 he was a member of the Assembly at the union of the Hartford and New Haven Colonies. In May, 1670, the Court invested him with authority to “joyne persons in...

Biography of Rev. Linville J. Hall

For over half a century the Rev. Linville J. Hall devoted himself to bringing spiritual consolation to the soul-weary and those fearful of the after-life, for he was blessed with unusual sweetness of spirit and tactful sympathy. At the same time he was effective in the more militant side of a minister’s duties, in condemning evil stirringly and fearlessly wherever he found it, in offering a constructive life program, and in demonstrating by his own life all his preachments. His ministerial activities carried him to many localities throughout the United States, but his last years were passed in his native city, Springfield, Massachusetts. Linville J. Hall was born in Springfield on July 8, 1822, son of John and Bathsheba S. (White) Hall, and is a direct descendant of Paragon White, the first white child born in the United States. Educated in the Springfield grammar and high schools, he wished to continue his studies in a professional field and decided on the ministry, for which he studied at the Concord Biblical Institute, Concord, New Hampshire. He was ordained minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The first years of his career were passed at Brookline, New Hampshire. He was pastor at various New England churches, including one in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and East Boston, where he remained for three years. In 1873 he went to Colorado, serving as minister in Colorado City, at Central City, and other Colorado and Wyoming towns. In 1886 he was appointed chaplain of the State Penitentiary at Canyon City, Colorado, where for ten years he ministered to the spiritual wants of the inmates of that institution. His...

Mattabesec Tribe

Mattabesec Indians (from massa-sepuēs-et, ‘at a [relatively] great rivulet or brook. Trumbull). An important Algonquian tribe of Connecticut, formerly occupying both banks of Connecticut river from Wethersfield to Middletown or to the coast and extending westward indefinitely. The Wongunk, Pyquaug, and Montowese Indians were apart of this tribe. According to Ruttenber they were a part of the Wappinger, and perhaps occupied the original territory from which colonies went out to overrun the country as far as Hudson river. The same author says their jurisdiction extended over all south west Connecticut, including the Mahackeno, Uncowa, Paugusset, Wepawaug, Quinnipiac, Montowese, Sukiang, and...

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