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Chief Pontiac of the Ottawa’s

Immediately after the peace of 1763 all the French forts in the west as far as Green Bay were garrisoned with English troops; and the Indians now began to realize, but too late, what they had long apprehended the selfish designs of both French and English threatening destruction, if not utter annihilation, to their entire race. These apprehensions brought upon the theatre of Indian warfare, at that period of time, the most remarkable Indian in the annals of history, Pontiac, the chief of the Ottawa’s and the principal sachem of the Algonquin Confederacy. He was not only distinguished for his noble and manly form, commanding address and proud demeanor, but also for his lofty courage, winning manners and a pointed and vigorous eloquence, which won the respect and confidence of all Indians, and made him a marked example of that grandeur and sublimity of character so often found among his so greatly miscomprehended race. Pontiac had closely watched the slowly advancing power of the English, and their haughty and defiant encroachments upon the territories of his own people and his entire race. When he was informed of the approach of Major Rogers with a company of English soldiers into his country, the indignation of the forest hero was roused to its highest pitch; and at once he sent a messenger to Rogers, who met him on the 7th of November, 1763, with a request to halt until Pontiac, the chief of the Nation, should arrive, then on his way. As soon as Pontiac came up he boldly demanded of Rogers his business and why he had come with his soldiers...

Experience Bozarth’s Heroic Stand – Indian Captivities

Signal Prowess of a Woman, In a Combat with Some Indians. In a Letter to a Lady of Philadelphia Westmoreland, April 26, 1779. Madam, I have written an account of a very particular affair between a white man and two Indians.1 I am now to give you a relation in which you will see how a person of your sex acquitted herself in defense of her own life, and that of her husband and children. The lady who is the burthen of this story is named Experience Bozarth. She lives on a creek called Dunkard creek, in the southwest corner of this county. About the middle of March last, two or three families, who were afraid to stay at home, gathered to her house and there stayed; looking on themselves to be safer than when all scattered about at their own houses. On a certain day some of the children thus collected came running in from play in great haste, saying there were ugly red men. One of the men in the house stepped to the door, where he received a ball in the side of his breast, which caused him to fall back into the house. The Indian was immediately in over him, and engaged with another man who was in the house. The man tossed the Indian on a bed, and called for a knife to kill him. (Observe these were all the men that were in the house.) Now Mrs. Bozarth appears the only defense, who, not finding a knife at hand, took up an axe that lay by, and with one blow cut out the brains...

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Rebecca M. Swain

(See Thompson and Riley)-Joseph Polstrom, born February 11, 1834, in Birmingham, Alabama; married November 16, 1863 in Bayou Menard, Susan Rebecca Wilson, who was born July 19, 1846, at Fort Gibson. They were the parents of Rebecca McNair Polstrom, born August 19, 1864 on Bayou Menard, and was educated in the Female Seminary at Tahlequah. She married December 27, 1879, John son of George and Nancy (Cramer) Swain, born October 5, 1833 in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. He served in the Union Army during the Civil War in Company E, Fourth California Infantry. He died April 6, 1920. Mr. Swain was a charter member of the Vinita Lodge No 5, A. F. & A. M. and a 32nd degree Mason. Mrs. Swain is a member of the Congregational Church; and Grand Matron of the Order of the Eastern Star of the Indian Territory, having held that position in 1895-6. She is also a member of the Woman’s Civic League, Delphian and Premier Worthwhile Clubs. Mrs. Swain’s Cherokee name is Quaitsia, and she is a member of the “Long Hair”...

Biography of Samuel R. Dillinger

Samuel R. Dillinger. One of the well known families of Clay County is that of Dillinger, which for many years had been active in the grain elevator business, and it had a worthy representative in Samuel R. Dillinger, who is manager of the Farmers Elevator Company at Bennington, Kansas. Mr. Dillinger was born in Des Moines County, Iowa, July 15, 1855, and is the elder of two sons born to his parents, who were Daniel and Nancy (Davis) Dillinger. His younger brother, Daniel Dillinger, came to Kansas in 1886 and is a prosperous farmer in Sherman County. In tracing his ancestry back several generations Samuel R. Dillinger finds that his paternal grandfather, Daniel Dillinger, was born in 1789, in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where his grandfather had established himself when he came from Germany. Daniel Dillinger followed agricultural pursuits in Westmoreland County and died there in 1845. On the maternal side the grandfather, John Davis, born in 1803, in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, was a descendant of a Hessian soldier who settled in Pennsylvania during the War of the Revolution. John Davis came to the West in the early 50’s and settled in Des Moines County, Iowa, where he became a farmer, having previously been a miller. He was married in Pennsylvania to Louisa Groover, and both died in Des Moines County. Daniel Dillinger, father of Samuel R. Dillinger, was born in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, in 1829, and died in Des Moines County, Iowa, in 1857. He grew to manhood in his native place, where he followed farming and worked at the carpenter trade, and then came to Des Moines County,...

Biography of Samuel R. Dillinger, Jr.

Samuel R. Dillinger, Jr. At all times the grain trade is one of vital importance in every country, and at the present time, when the eyes of a large portion of the earth are turned expectantly to the mighty grain yields of the United States, does the conservation of this food and its proper handling as a commercial factor take on added importance. To buy grain carefully, knowingly and economically requires something more than the trading instinet, it necessitates the possession of special talents and certain knowledge that can only come through actual experience. Samuel R. Dillinger, who is manager of the Co-operative Grain Association at Green, Kansas, was brought up in the business and is one of the best judges of grain in Kansas. Samuel R. Dillinger was born in Hamilton County, Nebraska, September 23, 1880. His parents are Samuel R. and Melissa Belle (Galientine) Dillinger, residents of Bennington, Kansas. They were born in Iowa and for some years resided in Clay and Hamilton counties, Nebraska. The father had always been more or less identified with farm and grain interests and at present is manager of an elevator at Bennington. Politically he is a Democrat and for nine years had been a member of the school board at Bennington. He belongs to and liberally supports the Methodist Episcopal Church and is a eitizen who is held in universal esteem. His children, six in number, are as follows: Samuel R.; Helen, who is the wife of Milton Fritz, resided on a farm near Plainville; Nellie, who is the wife of William Wing, who owned a lumber yard at Luray,...

Biography of Robert F. Fulton

A worthy representative of the legal fraternity, and the first city attorney of Grangeville, Robert F. Fulton is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in Westmoreland County, December 8, 1864. He is of Scotch-Irish lineage, his great-grandfather, John Fulton, having been a resident of the north of Ireland, whence he emigrated to Pennsylvania at an early epoch in the history of this country. The grandfather, George Fulton, was born in the Keystone state and the father, James P. Fulton, is a native of Washington County, Pennsylvania. He married Miss Frances Shouse, also a native of the same county, and descended from good old Revolutionary stock, her great-grandfather having served as a colonel in the Continental army. In religious faith the family has always been connected with the Presbyterian Church. Rev. Cooper, the great-grandfather of our subject, was the first minister of that denomination west of the Alleghany Mountains. James P. Fulton also became a Presbyterian minister, and in 1875 went to Harper County, Kansas, becoming a most efficient laborer in that field, where many Presbyterian churches stand in evidence of his untiring zeal and efforts in behalf of the cause of Christianity. He organized the first church in the county, and since that time has been actively identified with Christian work there. He and his estimable wife are still residing in Harper, and if their lives are spared until May 1900, they will celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage. Rev. James P. Fulton is now seventy-five years of age. Eight sons and two daughters have been born to them, and the family is one of the...

Biography of John McKimens

John McKimens. Pottawatomie County was organized in 1857, It is one of the oldest counties in that section of the state that was fairly well settled during the border period of Kansas history. The present county seat, Westmoreland, was established in 1871 and was named for Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. The pioneer who gave the name to the county seat was the late John McKimens, Sr. He was one of the first settlers in Pottawatomie County, having located at the present site of Westmoreland in Oetober, 1856, a year before the county was organized. John McKimens, Sr., was born in Pennsylvania in 1822 and came to Kansas from Westmoreland County. His grandfather had immigrated from Ireland to Pennsylvania. His father, Henry MeKimens, was born in Pennsylvania and spent his life there as a farmer, dying in Westmoreland County in 1870. He married a woman of German ancestry. John McKimens, Sr., grew up in Pennsylvania, and on coming to Kansas located on a farm in Pottawatomie County, and in 1858 secured the establishment of a post office, which was the nueleus around which the present City of Westmoreland developed. He preempted a claim of 160 acres, and gradually developed a good farm, and at the time of his death, which occurred at Westmoreland in 1896, be owned 250 acres. He was a leader in hls community in making it a free state and was always a loyal republican, John McKimens, Sr., married Mrs. Elizaheth (Wright) Hazen. Her first husband was Z. H. Hazen, and by that union there is one son, W. B. Hazen, now a merchant at Minneapolis, Kansas. Mrs....

Biography of Joseph Cameron Lockhart

Joseph Cameron Lockhart, a veteran Union soldier and a resident of Kansas for nearly forty-five years, had had a successful business career as a farmer and rancher and is now enjoying the fruits of his well spent lifetime at Eskridge in Wabaunsee County. Mr. Lockhart was born in Salem Township of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, February 12, 1838, and is now in his eightieth year, still active and vigorous for all his experiences. The Lockhart ancestors were Scotch and settled in Pennsylvania in colonial times. His father, George Lockhart, was born in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in 1807, spent his life there as a merchant and died in 1845. Politically he was identified with the whig party. George Lockhart married Maria Bidlack, who was born in Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in 1819 and died there in 1893, at the age of seventy-four. Joseph C. was the oldest of their four children, John became a Union soldier and died while in the war. Isabelle, who died at Kingston, Pennsylvania, married L. C. Dart, an insurance man, also deceased. George died when a young man in New York City. Joseph C. Lockhart acquired his early education in the district schools of Luzerne County and also for three years attended the Wyoming Seminary at Kingston, Pennsylvania. At the age of eighteen, having completed his education, he moved west to Illinois and for a time was a merchant at Polo. The Civil war soon came on and broke up his business with that of many others and in 1862 he volunteered in Company B of the Seventh Illinois Cavalry. He was in the service a little...

Biography of Robert McCloud Gwinn

In the early development of Idaho this honored citizen of Caldwell came to the territory to preach the gospel among those who were isolated from the interests and advantages of the east. He was the first representative of the Methodist ministry in the territory and continued his labors for many years, but is now living retired. A man of ripe scholarship and marked executive ability, one whose life has been consecrated to the cause of the Master and to the uplifting of men, there is particular propriety in directing attention to his life history, as it has left so great an impress upon the development of the state. A native of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, he was born on the 5th of June 1833, and is of Scotch descent. His grandfather, John Gwinn, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and after residing for a time in county Tyrone, Ireland, crossed the Atlantic to America, when this country was a part of the British colonial possessions. He brought with him from the Emerald Isle letters from the pastor of his church, certifying to his high Christian character; also a letter from the member of the house of burgesses of his town in county Tyrone. Here he placed his membership in the Covenanters’ Church, and by his upright life sustained the reputation which he had borne in the old church in Ireland. At the time when British oppression became intolerable he joined the colonists in their struggle for independence, and gallantly fought for liberty, under command of General Washington, until the close of hostilities. After receiving an honorable discharge he located on the...
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