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Biography of Charles S. Rowell

Charles S. Rowell, a farmer and the Postmaster of West Hopkinton, was born June 26, 1857, in the house which he now occupies, son of Isaac and Harriet (Adams) Rowell. This farm was owned by his great-grandfather, who settled here shortly after the Revolutionary War, probably about 1780, and was the birthplace of his grandfather, Moses Rowell, who was born November 29, 1776. Moses lived on the farm both during his father’s lifetime and after his death, when he became its owner. At one time he owned some mills; but after a while he sold them, devoting himself exclusively to the farm. On November 26, 1801, he married Tamesin Eastman, who had eight children-Abram, Benjamin, Elizabeth, Abram, Isaac, Albert G., Achsa, and Roxana. Abram died at the age of seven years, Albert at the age of five, and Achsa in infancy. Isaac Rowell, born April 19, 1813, remained on the farm with his father until he was sixteen years of age. Then he learned the carpenter’s trade, which he afterward followed until his marriage, on which occasion he returned to the farm. He made several additions to the farm, which contained in his time about three hundred acres of land. In 1840, February 20, he married Harriet R. Adams, a daughter of James and Lydia Johnson Adams, of Henniker. They had five children, namely: James A. and Harriet Ella, who died in infancy; Harriet Ella (second), who on October 24, 1866, married Frank Howlett, of Bradford; Mary E., who married June 9, 1874, George Gove, of Henniker; and Charles S., the subject of this sketch. Mr. Howlett died June...

Biography of Frank Henry Carr

Frank Henry Carr, one of the patriotic men who periled his life in the cause of the Union during the late Civil War, now an enterprising mill-owner of West Hopkinton, was born in West Hopkinton, February 8, 1841, son of Thomas W. and Caroline (Connor) Carr. The grandfather, John Carr, removed from West Newbury, Mass., to Concord, N.H., where he kept an inn for a short time. From Concord he came to West Hopkinton about the year 1821, making his residence on a farm which had been presented to his wife by her brother, Thomas Williams. While a carriage-maker by trade, he had a natural aptitude for general mechanical work. One of the most cherished possessions of his grandson’s family to-day is an old ‘cello made by him in his leisure hours. In politics he was an ardent Whig. He died on the old farm at the age of seventy-five. His wife, Abigail, who survived him some years, attaining the age of eighty-six, was a magnificent specimen of New England womanhood, strong, energetic, and cheerful up to the day of her death. She left a lasting impression upon her grandchildren, then growing up about her. Mr. and Mrs. John Carr had a family of eight children-Anna, Eliza, Emma, Abigail, Almira, Helen, Samuel, and Thomas Williams. Thomas W. Carr spent his early life upon the farm. While quite a young man, he was a Captain of militia. Later he engaged in farming and lumbering. The latter business was carried on in a factory the beam of which was twenty-four inches square and seventy feet long, and much heavy timber was...

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