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Slave Narrative of David A. Hall

Person Interviewed: David A. Hall Location: Canton, Ohio Place of Birth: Goldsboro, NC Date of Birth: July 25, 1847 Place of Residence: 1225 High Ave., S.W., Canton, Ohio Ohio Guide, Special Ex-Slave Stories August 16, 1937 DAVID A. HALL “I was born at Goldsboro, N.C., July 25, 1847. I never knew who owned my father, but my mother’s master’s name was Lifich Pamer. My mother did not live on the plantation but had a little cabin in town. You see, she worked as a cook in the hotel and her master wanted her to live close to her work. I was born in the cabin in town. “No, I never went to school, but I was taught a little by my master’s daughter, and can read and write a little. As a slave boy I had to work in the military school in Goldsboro. I waited on tables and washed dishes, but my wages went to my master the sane as my mother’s. “I was about fourteen when the war broke out, and remember when the Yankees came through our town. There was a Yankee soldier by the name of Kuhns who took charge of a Government Store. He would sell tobacco and such like to the soldiers. He was the man who told me I was free and then give me a job working in the store. “I had some brothers and sisters but I do not remember them-can’t tell you anything about them. “Our beds were homemade out of poplar lumber and we slept on straw ticks. We had good things to eat and a lot of...

Slave Narrative of Uncle Willis Williams

Interviewer: Genevieve W. Chandler Person Interviewed: Willis Williams Location: Conway, South Carolina “When wuz I born? Born in August. When I wuz born been August. I wuz a man grown pulling boxes, (turpentine boxes) when the shake wuz. I know the very night the shake come——on a Wednesday night. I wuz on door step loosing my shoe string. There wuz more religion then than they is now. Praying and prayer meeting for a month. Everybody tend meeting. “I been with the Yankee. I kin tell you bout the Yankee. They come home there to Rock Creek when the war wuz breaking up and carried me to Fayetteville. (N.C.) Kept me with ’em till Johnson surrendered in Raleigh,——then they kept me in Goldsboro and took me on to Petersburg. After everything over they give me free transportation back home. Free on train back to Fayetteville. They had put all the Yankee clothes on me,——all the blue shirt, blue coat and bumps on the shoulder,—and when they start me home took all the Yankee clothes way from me. Put gray clothes on me and sent me back. I member they took me up in a way-up-yonder building—to Richmond. Couldn’t tell you the depth of it. Man on the ground looked like boy. “The man I belonged to been Mass John A. Williams. (Born on the Cape Fear.) I goes by Mass John name—Williams. His sons been John, James, Charlie, Wallis, William, James. James come home from army sick. Had the mumps; thirty days furlough. “Member when the Yankees come. Been Sunday morning. Ride up to the gate on horses. Old Boss...

Slave Narrative of John C. Bectom

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: John C. Bectom Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: Oct. 7, 1862 My name is John C. Bectom. I was born Oct. 7, 1862, near Fayetteville, Cumberland County, North Carolina. My father’s name was Simon Bectom. He was 86 years of age when he died. He died in 1910 at Fayetteville, N. C. My mother’s name was Harriet Bectom. She died in 1907, May 23, when she was seventy years old. My brother’s were named Ed, Kato and Willie. I was third of the boys. My sisters were Lucy, Anne and Alice. My father first belonged to Robert Wooten of Craven County, N. C. Then he was sold by the Wootens to the Bectoms of Wayne County, near Goldsboro, the county seat. My mother first belonged to the McNeills of Cumberland County. Miss Mary McNeill married a McFadden, and her parents gave my mother to Mis’ Mary. Mis’ Mary’s daughter in time married Ezekial King and my mother was then given to her by Mis’ Mary McFadden, her mother. Mis’ Lizzie McFadden became a King. My grandmother was named Lucy Murphy. She belonged to the Murpheys. All the slaves were given off to the children of the family as they married. My father and mother told me stories of how they were treated at different places. When my grandmother was with the Murpheys they would make her get up, and begin burning logs in new grounds before daybreak. They also made her plow, the same as any of the men on the plantation. They plowed till dusk-dark before they left the fields to...

Slave Narrative of Lizzie Baker

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Lizzie Baker Location: 424 Smith Street, Raleigh, North Carolina I was born de las’ year o’ de surrender an’course I don’t remember seein’ any Yankee soldiers, but I knows a plenty my mother and father tole me. I have neuritis, an’ have been unable to work any fer a year and fer seven years I couldn’t do much. My mother wus named Teeny McIntire and my father William McIntire. Mammy belonged to Bryant Newkirk in Duplin County. Pap belonged to someone else, I don’t know who. Dey said dey worked from light till dark, and pap said dey beat him so bad he run away a lot o’ times. Dey said de paterollers come to whare dey wus havin’ prayer meetin’ and beat ’em. Mammy said sometimes dey were fed well and others dey almost starved. Dey got biscuit once a week on Sunday. Dey said dey went to de white folks’s church. Dey said de preachers tole ’em dey had to obey dere missus and marster. My mammy said she didn’t go to no dances ’cause she wus crippled. Some o’ de help, a colored woman, stole something when she wus hongry. She put it off on mother and missus made mother wear trousers for a year to punish her. Mammy said dey gave de slaves on de plantation one day Christmas and dat New Years wus when dey sold ’em an’ hired ’em out. All de slaves wus scared ’cause dey didn’t know who would have to go off to be sold or to work in a strange place. Pap tole...

Woccon Indians

Woccon Tribe: Significance unknown. Woccon Connections. The Woccon belonged to the Siouan linguistic stock, their closest relations being the Catawba. Woccon Location. Between Neuse River and one of its affluents, perhaps about the present Goldsboro, Wayne County. Woccon Villages Tooptatmeer, supposed to have been in Greene County. Yupwauremau, supposed to have been in Greene County. Woccon History.-The first mention of the Woccon appears to be by Lawson writing about 1701, who recorded 150 words of their language. These show that it was nearer Catawba than any other known variety of speech. Lack of any earlier mention of such a large tribe lends strength to the theory of Dr. Douglas L. Rights that they were originally Waccamaw (see South Carolina). They took part against the Whites in the Tuscarora Wars and were probably extinguished as a tribe at that time, the remnant fleeing north with the Tuscarora, uniting with the Catawba, or combining with other Siouan remnants in the people later known as Croatan. Woccon Population. The number of Woccon war estimated by Mooney (1928) at 600 in 1600. Lawson (1860) gives 120 warriors in 1709. Connection in which they have become noted. The sole claim of the Woccon to distinction is from the fact that it is the only one of the southern group of eastern Siouan tribes other than the Catawba from which a vocabulary has been...

Harvey L. Whitley

Corpl., Co. D, 30th Div., 119th Regt.; of Wayne County; son of W. R. and Mrs. Elizabeth Whitley. Entered service April 23, 1917, at Fremont. Sent to Camp Royster, when on bridge duty at Haw River. Transferred to Camp Wadsworth, Camp Sevier, Camp Merritt, then to Boston, Mass. Sailed for France May 12, 1918. Fought at Ypres, Voormizelle, Bellicourt, Premont, Busigny, Montbrehain, Hindenburg Line. Was on front duty with the 1st Btry. 119th. Returned to USA April 2, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 7,...

Thomas A. Whitfield

1st Lt., Inf., Mach. Gunnery, M. G. Co., 119th Inf., 30th Div.; of Wayne County; son of Thomas A. and Mrs. Mary G. Whitfield. Husband of Mrs. Mary Pope Whitfield. Entered service June 19, 1916, at Camp Glenn, N.C., transferred to Ft. Bliss, then to Camp Sevier. Sailed for Calais, France, May 29, 1917. Promoted to rank of 2nd Lt. Nov. 13, 1917; 1st Lt. April 15, 1918. Fought at Voormizelle, Bel. Busigny, France, Premont, Bellicourt, St. Souplet, Haie Menneresse, Molain, Vaux-Andigny, Mazinghein. Gassed at Bellicourt Sept. 29, 1918. Sent to hospital at Aminens, Rouen. Transferred from 30th Div. to 3rd Div. and on duty with 7th Inf. in Andemach, Germany, from Jan. 1, 1919, to June 11, 1919. Transferred to 89th Div. Mustered out at Camp...

J. R. Whitley

Sergt., 30th Div., 105th San. Tr., F. H., 120th Co.; of Wayne County; son of W. R. and Mrs. Elizabeth Whitley. Husband of Mrs. Ruth Sutton Whitley. Entered service Sept. 4, 1917, at Burlington, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., then to Camp Mills, N. Y. Sailed for France June 4th; landed June 11, 1918. Fought at Chateau Thierry, Marne offensive, Soissons. Returned to USA April 1, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson April 6,...

William C. Thomas

1st Sergt., Co. D, 30th Div., 119th Inf.; of Wayne County; son of Mrs. Susan Thomas. Husband of Mrs. Daisy Thomas. Entered service July 15, 1916, at Goldsboro, N.C. Sent to Camp Glenn, N.C., Camp Stewart, Texas, Camp Royster, Camp Wadsworth, Camp Sevier, Camp Merritt, and sailed for France May 11, 1918. Was in all engagements with 119th Inf. Served six months on Mexican border. Returned to USA April 2, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson April 7,...

Willie B. Thompson

Private 1st Class, Co. F, 30th Div., 120th Regt.; of Wayne County; son of A. P. and Mrs. B. Thompson. Husband of Mrs. Mary J. Thompson. Entered service April 5, 1916, at Fremont. Sent to Camp Pickett, transferred to Camp Sevier, then to Camp Merritt. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Was in all engagements with company until wounded at the Hindenburg Drive by shrapnel in Thigh Sept. 29th. Returned to USA March 24, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., May 23,...
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