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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Duncan

WAYNE CO. (Gertrude Vogler) [Mrs. Duncan:] “After the War was over mammie’s old man did not want us with them, so he threatened to kill us. Then my old mammie fixed us a little bundle of what few clothes we had and started us two children out to go back to the Campbell family in Albany. The road was just a wilderness and full of wild animals and varmints. Mammie gave us some powder and some matches, telling us to put a little down in the road every little while and set fire to it. This would scare the wild animals away from us. “We got to the river at almost dark and some old woman set us across the river in a canoe. She let us stay all night wit her, and we went on to ‘Grandpap Campbells” (We always called him grandpap instead of master, as the others did.) When he saw us comin’ he said ‘Lawd have mercy here comes them poor little chillun’. “I stayed with them that time until I was big enough to be a house girl. Then I went to live with the Harrison family in Albany; and I lived with them till I married old Sam Duncan and come to Wayne County to live. I’ve raised a family of nine children and have thirty-seven grand children and twenty great grand children. “Every one of my children wears a silver dime on a string around their leg, to keep off the witches spell. One time, before my daughter Della got to wearing it, she was going down the road, not far from...

Slave Narrative of Will Oats

Interviewer: Hazel Cinnamon Person Interviewed: Will Oats Location: Mercer County, Kentucky Place of Birth: Wayne County KY Date of Birth: 1854 Age: 84 Mercer County. Ex-Slave Stories. (Hazel Cinnamon) Interview with Will Oats-Ex-Slave: Will Oats, 84 years of age, was born in Wayne County, up Spring Valley in 1854. He was the son of Betty Oats and Will Garddard of North Carolina. He has three sisters: Lucy Wilson, Frances Phillips that live in Ohio, and Alice Branton of Mercer County, Kentucky. He has two brothers; Jim Coffey and Lige Coffey of Harrodsburg. As a child he lived with his mother, brothers, sisters, and grandmother. Their quarters were in the yard of their master; and they were as comfortable as any slaves-with plenty to eat and clothes to keep them warm. Will was just a boy at that time, and he cut wood and carried it in; and did other chores around the house such as help to milk and feed the stock. Their food was plentiful and they ate all kinds of vegetables, and had plenty of milk and butter, fat meat, and bread. The family all wore home made clothing, cotton shirts, heavy shoes, very heavy underwear; and if they wore out their winter shoes before the spring weather they had to do without until the fall. Will was owned by Lewis Oats and his sister; they lived in a two story house, built of log and weather boarded. They were very wealthy people. The farm consisted of over 230 acres; they owned six slaves; and they had to be up doing their morning work before the master...

Biography of Thomas Higginbotham

THOMAS HIGGINBOTHAM – The representative and well known gentleman whose name appears at the head of this article has been a resident of Union County for more than a score of years, and he is to-day numbered with the most substantial and influential citizens here, and his home place, a farm two miles northwest from Elgin, displays industry and thrift, coupled with which are his stanch qualities of worth and moral excellence. On March 17, 1856, in Wayne county, Kentucky, our Subject was born to James and Priscilla (Cullum) Higginbotham, natives also of the Blue Grass State. In 1863 the parents went to Clay county, Illinois, and thence to Sangamon county, the same state, where the father was called from life in the fall of 1864, and his remains lie buried in Springfield, Illinois. In the same year the balance of the family removed to Marion county, Iowa, the older sons occupying themselves with the art of agriculture. In 1867 they removed to Sullivan county, Missouri, and for six years continued their employment in the line of farming, then went to Linn county and there they tilled the soil until the date of their advent to the west in 1881. They first went to Walla Walla, Washington, and after a few months came thence to Union county, in October of the same year. Our subject then purchased his present place, two miles northwest from Elgin. It contained one hundred and sixty acres, and is now the size of three hundred and sixty acres. Mr. George C. Higginbotham, a brother of our subject, and born August 31, 1845, in Wayne...

Biography of James McDermott, Hon.

Hon. James McDermott. The career of James McDermott, now a retired resident of the City of Winfield, has been one remarkable in many ways, and his life story contains many interesting chapters. From newsboy on the streets of New York to leading lawyer and member of the Kansas Legislature, his active career led him through many of the most important battles of the Civil war, as well as through the struggles of political life, and through it all he has maintained a reputation for courage, fidelity and absolute fearlessness. Mr. McDermott was born in New York City, New York, June 6, 1841, and is a son of Hugh McDermott, who was a native of Ireland and who became an extensive contractor in this country. He was taken to Kentucky when about twelve years of age. It was here that he attended his first term of school, and completed his education largely by private study until he qualified as a teacher and taught in several schools in Kentucky. When the Civil war threatened the destruction of the Union and the families of his neighborhood were rent by dissenting political opinions, he cast his lot with the Union, and in July, 1861, became a member of Company I, Second Regiment, Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, of which he had been one of the organizers. At the time of the organization of the company he was made orderly sergeant, and later he was promoted second, and then first lieutenant, and during the last three years of active service commanded his, and incomplete fragments of other companies. Mr. McDermott participated in the battle of Mill...

Biographical Sketch of J. S. Garner, M. D.

J. S. Garner, M. D., Salisbury; was born in Russell Co., Ky., Oct. 14, 1831; at the age of 18, he went to Lancaster, Garrard Co., Ky., where he studied medicine in the office of J. S. Pierce, M. D., for three years; after which, he attended a course of lectures in Louisville, Ky., and commenced the practice of medicine in Wayne Co., Ky., and continued there up to the year 1863, when, having recruited. Co. K, 48th Regt. Ky. Vols., was elected its First Lieutenant, and, having served for eighteen months in our late civil war, moved to Salisbury, Coles Co., and has been practicing medicine there ever since. He has held the office of Postmaster for ten years, and holds it at the present time. He married in Wayne Co., Ky., April 24, 1854, Miss Minnie E. Roberts, daughter of ‘Squire Roberts; they have seven children – Mary E., Emma A., John P. L., Minnie M., Viola B., Edwin M. S. and Lulu...

Wayne County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Wayne County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Wayne County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Wayne County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Wayne County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Transcription A-K Census Transcription L-Y Hosted at RootsWeb Census File 1 of 2 Census File 2 of 2 Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Wayne County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Wayne County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Wayne County USGenWeb Archives Project Garner Surname Census Index Census Transcription Page 80-84 Census Transcription Page 85-89 Census Transcription Page 90-94 Census Transcription Page 95-100 Census Transcription Page 101-106 Hosted at Wayne County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Alphabetical Index Census Transcription. part 1 Census Transcription, part 2 Census Transcription, part 3 Census Transcription, part 4 Census Transcription, part 5 Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Wayne County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Wayne County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Wayne County USGenWeb Archives Project Garner Surname Hosted at Wayne County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Census Index Census Transcription, part 1 Census Transcription, part 2 Census Transcription, part 3 Census Transcription, part 4 Census Transcription, part 5 Census...

Biography of Joseph F. Savage

Joseph F. Savage. There are many things of interest connected with the career of Joseph F. Savage, of Coffeyville, particularly in the line of achievements and success and position gained through individual efforts and with honor. Perhaps the most interesting, however, as well as the most important in regard to the history of Kansas, is the fact that this retired banker made what was really the first treaty here with the Osage Indians, this being in 1868, when Mr. Savage was a “sooner.” Since that time his fortunes have grown and developed and he has watched what was once the Indian country develop into a center of civilization, and has done his full share in bringing about the progress that has been made. Mr. Savage was born in Wayne County, Kentucky, February 2, 1839, and is a son of E. S. and Martha (Minges) Savage. He belongs to a family that originated in England and emigrated to the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia during colonial times, and his grandfather was John Savage, who was born in Virginia in 1765 and became a pioneer of Wayne County, Kentucky. He was a farmer by vocation, fought under General Jackson in the War of 1812, and was wounded at the Battle of New Orleans, and finally passed away, honored and respected at his Kentucky home, in 1855. E. S. Savage was born in Wayne County, Kentucky, in 1795, was educated in his native locality and followed the vocation of farming throughout his life there, dying in 1863. He was a man of sterling qualities of character, and through straightforward dealing and good citizenship...

Cemetery Hill

Cemetery Hill as it is known to us here, being in London, Ky. was a hill on which a Civil War battle was fought. The trenches are still here. The hill was given to the north to bury their dead by Jarvis Jackson, a great grand father of the Jarvis Jackson who is now city police of London, today. By some reason, the soldiers were taken up and moved to a different place only a few years ago. Mrs. Hoage says “the first daisies that were brought to this contry were put on that hill” and she can remember when the entire hill was covered with them. The southern side had trenches on the east side of the Dixie Highway on and surrounding the site where the Pennington Hospital is now standing, which are very vivid today. The London City School being in the path bears a hole today from a cannon ball. Shot no doubt from the Southern forces. The new addition to the school hides the hole, but until recent years it could be seen being about ten inches in diameter. Zollie Coffer a southern general had camped at Wild Cat, Ky. but was forced to retreat when general Garrad and Lucas and Stratton two captains under him, all from Clay county, with a large crowd came in. He, on his retreat came through London and had a battle with an army of Ohioians camped on Cemetery Hill. Quoted a poem by Mrs. Hodge, which she remembered from those days: “Just raise your eyes to yon grassy hill, View the bold Ohioians working with skill, Their bombs...

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