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Biography of Walter Wesley Tucker

Walter Wesley Tucker, a native son of Oklahoma and a member of a family that has been active in promoting the agricultural development of the state for the past thirty-six years, is the owner of a well improved farm near Ramona, in Washington county, and in its cultivation he employs the most progressive and up-to-date methods, productive of gratifying financial returns. His life has been spent in this section of the state, for he was born on Double creek, in Washington County, February 16, 1887, his parents being Daniel and Dadie (Hoff) Tucker. They formerly resided in Texas, but in 1886 left that state and settled on Double creek, where the father engaged in farming and stock raising until his demise, which occurred in 1895. Subsequently the mother became the wife of Jacob Newport, a well known farmer of Osage county. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker became the parents of six children: Thomas; Walter Wesley; Monroe; Nellie, who is now the wife of W. O. Jones; Viola, who married John Strome; and Esther. Walter W. Tucker, who is of Osage extraction, acquired his education in the public schools of Washington county and when fifteen years of age began his career as an agriculturist in this locality. In 1913 he received from the government an allotment of seventy acres of land situated on Double creek, two miles north of Ramona, in Washington County, and took up his abode thereon, subsequently adding to his holdings by the purchase of fifty acres. He cultivates fifty-five acres, raising large crops of wheat, Kaffir and Indian corn and also some alfalfa, and the remainder of...

Biography of John Brown Churchill

In the demise of John Brown Churchill, Bartlesville lost one of its most highly respected and public-spirited citizens, who during the period of his residence in Washington county, took a most active and helpful part in promoting the work of public progress and improvement and left the impress of his individuality for good upon many lines of the state’s development and up building. He was born in Hodgenville, Kentucky, September 28, 1867, and traced his lineage back to the noted Churchill family of England. His parents were William and Gillie Ann (Allen) Churchill, who were also natives of the Blue Grass state, and the father devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits. John Brown Churchill’s’ education was acquired in the grammar schools of Hodgenville and he attended high school in Kansas, going to that state when sixteen years of age. There he took up a homestead, which he improved and developed, and later he traveled out of Kansas for the Emerson-Newton Company, implement dealers, continuing to fill that position for fifteen years and gaining broad experience along business lines. In 1903 he came to Bartlesville and here made his home until his demise. He played an important part in developing the rich oil fields of this section of the state, purchasing oil property at Copan, in Washington County, which proved to be a splendid investment, and the wells are still operated by his widow. In association with others he laid out and sold a tract of thirty-five acres, constituting the greater part of the town of Copan, and his interests were most capably and judiciously conducted, a spirit of marked...

Biography of J. W. Jackson

Among the public-spirited citizens and progressive farmers of Washington County whose intelligently directed labors are valuable assets in promoting the agricultural development of northeastern Oklahoma is numbered J. W. Jackson, who resides on a highly productive farm situated on the Caney river, near Vera. He was born in Logan County, Kentucky, December 16, 1865, and his parents were George C. and Josephine (Anderson) Jackson, the former a native of Tennessee, while the latter was born in the Blue Grass state. The father established his home in Kentucky during the Civil war, in which he served until the close of hostilities as a lieutenant in the northern army, receiving a slight wound on the head while in the service. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson came to Indian Territory in 1874 and settled at Coffeyville, Kansas, in which locality the father engaged in farming and also dealt extensively in the buying and shipping of stock, accumulating a substantial competence through the capable management of his business interests. There he passed away in 1888, but the mother survives at the age of seventy-six and is living with her daughter, Mrs. Annie Davenport. For twenty-one years Mr. Jackson has resided in Oklahoma and when he first moved to his present place game was abundant here and the streams were plentifully supplied with fish. He is now operating a tract of two hundred acres, located on the Caney river, three and a half miles east of Vera, constituting the allotments of his wife and sons. He engages in general farming and upon the property there is a fine orchard of six acres, devoted to the...

Biography of John C. Asahl

John C. Asahl, a resident of Ramona since 1903 and connected with its mercantile interests throughout, the period, has also figured prominently in connection with public affairs of the city and no man has labored more earnestly, zealously and effectively to bring about public progress, reform and improvement than he Mr. Asahl is a native of Missouri, his birth having occurred in the city of California, March 7, 1870. His father, Charles Asahl, was a native of Germany and came to the United States in 1850, settling in Chicago in the year of the yellow fever plague. He was a mason and followed his trade in Chicago and afterward in California, Missouri. Later he went into the hardware business in California, Missouri. Subsequently he removed to Kansas City, Missouri, where he turned his attention to the hotel business, his sight having almost failed him in the meantime. There he passed away in 1901. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Anna Roedel, died when her son, John C., was an infant and the father afterward married again, his second wife being still a resident of Kansas City. John C. Asahl acquired his education at the place of his nativity, studying in both German and English schools until he was fifteen years of age, when he started out to provide for his own support, making his initial step in the business world as an employee of the firm of Gille & Van Peyma, dealers in heavy hardware. He remained with that house for fifteen years, winning promotion from time to time and eventually he entered the employ of the...

Biography of W. M. Tate

For twenty-one years W. M. Tate has been engaged in farming in Nowata county, residing all of this time on his present farm of one hundred and forty acres, four and one-half miles southeast of Nowata. He was born in western Kansas on the 4th of December, 1873, a son of P. A. and Margaret (Barnes) Tate, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Indiana. They moved from Iowa to Kansas one year before W. M. was born and located in Lincoln county, where they lived two years. At the termination of that time they went to Osborne county and the father took up a homestead and timber claim there, acquiring three hundred and twenty acres in all. For eight years they resided on that farm and then sold out, removing to Nemaha county, where they rented farm land until 1894. In that year they came to Indian Territory and located on the Verdigris river, three and one-half miles east of Watova. Leasing land from the Indians, they cleared it and brought it to a highly cultivated state during the eight years of their residence thereon. After two years on a farm in Chautauqua county, Kansas, Mr. and Mrs. Tate returned to Indian Territory and for two years resided on a farm three and one-half miles east of Bartlesville in Washington county. Subsequently they removed to the farm on which W. M. now resides, and the father engaged in farming here until his demise on the 1st of February, 1918, at the advanced age of eighty-one years. Mrs. Tate is still living, being now in her...

Biography of Frank Harris

Modern progressive agriculture in Washington county finds a prominent representative in Frank Harris, who is the owner of a desirable farm near Ochelata which in its neat and thrifty appearance gives every indication of the practical methods and careful supervision of the owner. He was born in Greene county, Illinois, of the marriage of Martin A. and Mary (King) Harris, the latter also a native of that county. The father was born in France and was brought to the United States when but three years old. He is a farmer by occupation and is now residing at Ramona, where he has made his home since 1901. To Mr. and Mrs. Harris were born three children: Mrs. Annie Hazell of Missouri; Charles, a resident of Ramona; and Frank, the subject of this review. The last named acquired his education in the grammar and high schools of Arrow Rock, Missouri, and in 1899 he came to Oklahoma, locating at Talala, in Rogers county, where he engaged in farming and cattle raising until 1908. He then moved to the west side of the Caney river, where he was similarly employed until 1911, when he purchased eight hundred and thirty acres of land four miles east and one mile south of Ochelata. Of this tract he farms two hundred and seventy-five acres and he also devotes considerable attention to stock raising, now having one hundred head of cattle, while he recently sold the same number. He has thirty-two thoroughbred Poland China hogs, paying one hundred dollars each for the sows and seventy-five dollars each for the males, and he also has forty-five head...

Biography of C. F. Reid

C. F. Reid, who has devoted much of his life to public service, is now acceptably filling the office of county treasurer and his thorough reliability and efficiency have won for him the confidence and respect of his fellow townsmen, who have found him faithful to every trust reposed in him. He was born in Bowling Green, Pike county, Missouri, and his parents were Alexander Finley and Anna M. (Blaine) Reid, the former a native of Kentucky, while the latter was born in Missouri. The ancestors of the subject of this review in both the paternal and maternal lines participated in the Revolutionary war and his mother’s people originally settled in Virginia, whence they later removed to Missouri, the first brick hotel in Bowling Green, that state, having been erected by a member of the family. During the infancy of C. F. Reid his parents went to Mexico, Missouri, and there the father passed away in 1902. The mother is still a resident of that city, having reached the advanced age of eighty years. C. F. Reid acquired his education in the grammar and high schools of Mexico, Missouri, and after completing his studies became connected with mercantile interests at Warrenton, that state. He was first called to public office in 1905, serving as deputy sheriff of Warren County, Missouri, until 1907, as treasurer from 1907 until 1913, when he was again chosen deputy sheriff, making a most creditable record in each of these positions. In 1915 he came to Oklahoma, settling at Dewey, where he entered the insurance business, and also acted as notary public. In 1917 he...

Biography of Henry Clinton Hamilton

Among the important industrial enterprises which have been factors in the commercial development of Bartlesville is that of the Commerce Candy Company, whose plant is located on North Park street. Henry Clinton Hamilton is serving as president of the corporation and the fact that he has been chosen to fill this responsible position is indisputable proof of his marked executive ability, business acumen and enterprise. He was born in Estill county, Kentucky, September 1, 1861, and is a son of Granville and Julie (Witt) Hamilton, who were also natives of the Blue Glass state, In which the father followed the occupation of farming. In the public schools of Kentucky; H. C. Hamilton received the rudiments of an education and he was employed at farm work until nearly forty years of age. In 1900 he settled near Afton, Oklahoma, where he engaged in farming, being assisted by his sons, but owing to the hot winds, insects and droughts his crops proved a failure and after seven years of ill luck he abandoned the enterprise and moved his family into the town, while he obtained work in the harvest fields. The next year he and his sons bought hay which they baled and shipped to Kansas City, this proving a profitable venture, and in 1908 the family took up their residence in Bartlesville. Mr. Hamilton then rented a farm a mile southeast of the town, but disaster again overtook him, his crops being ruined by the floods, and he moved his family back into the town of Bartlesville, while he and his sons once more turned their attention to the baling...

Biography of J. Rufus Miller

Among the progressive agriculturists of Washington county whose intelligently directed efforts have resulted in the attainment of a substantial degree of success is numbered J. Rufus Miller, who is the owner of a valuable farm situated seven and a half miles northeast of Dewey. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, December 1, 1873, and is a son of W. T. and Fannie Miller, also of the Blue Grass state who took up their residence in Indian Territory in 1878. For several years the father devoted his attention to farming in the vicinity of Tahlequah and is now residing in the town, of which he has been street commissioner for the past eighteen years, his long retention in that office indicating the value of his services and his integrity as a public official. He has reached the age of seventy-two, while his wife is sixty-eight years of age. J. Rufus Miller is a self-educated man and has always been connected with farming and stock raising interests. He formerly owned a tract of three hundred and twenty acres near Dewey and on disposing of that property purchased his present place of one hundred and sixty acres on Coon and Cedar creeks, in addition to which he leases and cultivates two hundred acres. He has a fine country home, situated in the midst of a beautiful grove of oak and elm trees, and has erected large and substantial barns and other outbuildings necessary for the shelter of grain and stock. He has brought his land to a high state of development and gathers abundant crops of wheat, oats and Kaffir corn, while...

Biography of J. H. Gorden

J. H. Gorden, a representative citizen and successful agriculturist of northeastern Oklahoma, where he has made his home for more than two decades, is busily engaged in the cultivation of a farm of fifty acres situated one mile north and four miles east of Dewey. His birth occurred in Henry county, Missouri, in 1861, his parents being J. B. and Anna (Parks) Gorden. The father is still living at the ripe old age of eighty-five years, and now resides at Wagoner, Oklahoma. The mother passed away in 1904. They reared a family of three sons, namely: J. H., of this review; Dr. G. R., living at Wagoner, Oklahoma; and B. P., who is a resident of Haworth, this state. J. H. Gorden supplemented his preliminary education by a course of study in the State Normal School at Warrensburg, Missouri, and subsequently followed the profession of teaching in his native county for a period of sixteen years, imparting readily and clearly to others the knowledge that he had acquired. The year 1900 witnessed his arrival in the Indian Territory and the establishment of his home on the O. H. ranch near Wann, in Nowata county, where he devoted his attention to farming and the handling of cattle for eight years. During that period the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad was put through the farm, cutting off a corner of it. At that time the road ran direct from Warm to Dewey, as there were no fences across sections. In 1907 Mr. Gorden was elected county clerk of Washington county and upon his accession to that office he took up his...
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