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Biographical Sketch of William Elgin

William Elgin is a native of Ohio, born in Wayne County, May 28, 1827. When he was four years of age his parents moved to Montgomery County, Ohio, and until he reached his twentieth year he attended school in that County, and also learned the cabinet-maker’s trade and spent some tine in farming. In 1849 he went to Dayton, Ohio, and from thence to Logansport, Indiana, working at his trade in both cities. At the end of two years he returned to Montgomery County and turned his attention to farming. After this he removed to Warren County, and enlisted, in 1861, in Company E., Fiftieth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, but remained only a short time on duty when he was appointed to act as captain of a company for home protection. In 1865 he came to Daviess County, purchased a farm in Sheridan Township, which he improved and cultivated for a few years, when he sold it and purchased the farm on which he now resides. Mr. Elgin was married, December 16, 1847, to Miss Rhoda M. Crosley, a native of Warren County, Ohio. They have four children: Josephine, born July 15, 1850; William Harry, born. July 22, 1859; Anna D., born October 31, 1863; and Clara, born March 16,...

Slave Narrative of Celia Henderson

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Celia Henderson Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Hardin County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1849 Age: 88 Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio MRS. CELIA HENDERSON, aged 88 Born Hardin County, Kentucky in 1849 (drawing of Celia Henderson) [TR: no drawing found] “Mah mammy were Julia Dittoe, an pappy, he were name Willis Dittoe. Dey live at Louieville till mammy were sold fo’ her marster’s debt. She were a powerful good cook, mammy were-an she were sol’ fo to pay dat debt.” “She tuk us four chillen ‘long wid her, an pappy an th’ others staid back in Louieville. Dey tuk us all on a boat de Big Ribber-evah heah ob de big ribber? Mississippi its name-but we calls it de big ribber.” “Natchez on de hill-dats whaah de tuk us to. Nactchez-on-de-hill dis side of N’ Or’leans. Mammy she have eleven chillen. No ’em, don’t ‘member all dem names no mo’. No ’em, nevah see pappy no moah. Im ‘member mammy cryin’ goin’ down on de boat, and us chillen a cryin’ too, but de place we got us was a nice place, nicer den what we left. Family ‘o name of GROHAGEN it was dat got us. Yas’em dey was nice to mammy fo’ she was a fine cook, mammy wus. A fine cook!” “Me? Go’Long! I ain’t no sech cook as my mammy was. But mah boy, he were a fine cook. I ain’t nothin’ of a cook. Yas’em, I cook fo Mis Gallagher, an fo 4 o’ de sheriffs here, up at de jail. But de fancy cookin’ I ain’t much on, no’em...

Slave Narrative of Reverend Williams

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Rev. Williams Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Greenbriar County, West Virginia Date of Birth: 1859 Age: 76 Occupation: Methodist minister Miriam Logan Lebanon, Ohio July 8th Warren County, District 2 Story of REVEREND WILLIAMS, Aged 76, Colored Methodist Minister, Born Greenbriar County, West Virginia (Born 1859) “I was born on the estate of Miss Frances Cree, my mother’s mistress. She had set my grandmother Delilah free with her sixteen children, so my mother was free when I was born, but my father was not. “My father was butler to General Davis, nephew of Jefferson Davis. General Davis was wounded in the Civil War and came home to die. My father, Allen Williams was not free until the Emancipation.” “Grandmother Delilah belonged to Dr. Cree. Upon his death and the division of his estate, his maiden daughter came into possession of my grandmother, you understand. Miss Frances nor her brother Mr. Cam. ever married. Miss Frances was very religious, a Methodist, and she believed Grandmother Delilah should be free, and that we colored children should have schooling.” “Yes ma’m, we colored people had a church down there in West Virginia, and grandmother Delilah had a family Bible of her own. She had fourteen boys and two girls. My mother had sixteen children, two boys, fourteen girls. Of them-mother’s children, you understand, there were seven teachers and two ministers; all were educated-thanks to Miss Frances and to Miss Sands of Gallipolice. Mother lived to be ninety-seven years old. No, she was not a cook.” “In the south, you understand-there is the COLORED M.E. CHURCH, and...

Slave Narrative of Samuel Sutton

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Samuel Sutton Location: Lebanon, Ohio Place of Birth: Garrett County Kentucky Date of Birth: 1854 Miriam Logan, Lebanon, Ohio Warren County, Dist. 2 July 2, 1937 Interview with SAMUEL SUTTON, Ex Slave. Born in Garrett County, Kentucky, in 1854 (drawing of Sutton) [TR: no drawing found] “Yes’em, I sho were bo’n into slavery. Mah mothah were a cook-(they was none betteah)-an she were sold four times to my knownin’. She were part white, for her fathah were a white man. She live to be seventy-nine yeahs an nine months old.” “Ah was bo’n in Garrett County, but were raised by ol’ Marster Ballinger in Knox County, an’ ah don remember nothin ’bout Garrett County.” When Lincoln was elected last time, I were about eight yeahs ol’.” “Ol’ Marster own ’bout 400-acres, n’ ah don’ know how many slaves-maybe 30. He’d get hard up fo money n’ sell one or two; then he’d get a lotta work on hands, an maybe buy one or two cheap,-go ‘long lak dat you see.” He were a good man, Ol’ Mars Ballinger were-a preacher, an he wuk hisse’f too. Ol’ Mis’ she pretty cross sometime, but ol’ Mars, he weren’t no mean man, an ah don’ ‘member he evah whip us. Yes’em dat ol’ hous is still standin’ on the Lexington-Lancaster Pike, and las time I know, Baby Marster he were still livin.” “Ol’ Mars. tuk us boys out to learn to wuk when we was both right little me and Baby Mars. Ah wuz to he’p him, an do what he tol’ me to-an first thing ah...

Biographical Sketch of Prof. J.L. Boon

Prof. J. L. Boon was born two and a half miles north of Alexandria, in Smithville County, in 1855. He is the fifth of nine children of Jas. N. and Sarah (Barry) Boon. The father was of English descent, one of the same families as the Kentucky pioneer, Daniel Boone. Jas. N. was born in Wilson County in 1817. He was raised and educated mostly in Smith County. By close application to study, he was enabled to enter the teacher’s profession, which he followed in connection with farming. He was one of the most efficient and successful educators of that day. He married about his twenty-seventh year. The latter portion of his life was entirely devoted to agricultural pursuits. He accumulated considerable property and means, although he began a poor man. He died in 1886. His wife was born in Smith County about 1826. Both were consistent and esteemed members of the Christian Church. Five of the children are living, all members of the same church, one of them a minister in the Christian Church at Joplin, Mo. Prof. James L. received his early education at Alexandria. After teaching several years, attended two years at the National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio, graduating in 1879, in the literary and business courses. In 1880 he began teaching at Alexandria, where he has since been. He is an intelligent, cultivated and thorough instructor, and is universally popular with both patrons and pupils. May 29, 1885, He married Miss Mattie, daughter of Lun and Jales Wood, who was born in 1865, and educated at Alexandria, completing a musical course at Cincinnati, and...

Biographical Sketch of Henry King

It is not the rule for men to follow the trade or profession to which they are best adapted and to achieve the dominant ambition of their lives. This inclination and result can in absolute truth be said of Capt. Henry King. He learned the printer’s trade because the attraction was irresistible, and advanced from the composing room and hand press to the editorial desk because he must have foreseen the work he was best fitted to do. His taste and capacity were for writing, a natural force impelling him to reduce the workings of his mind to written form–and it was real writing, for he never used a stenographer or typewriter, and his “copy” was the perfection of chirography. As a young man he published and edited a weekly newspaper at his home town, LaHarpe, Illinois. This work was interrupted by a four years’ service in the army in 1861-65. Returning from the army, he engaged in a profitless mercantile business, and studied law, but all the time there was a ceaseless call to write, and he was soon working on the Daily Whig, at Quincy, Illinois, of which he became editor. Later, in 1869, he removed to Topeka, where in turn he edited the State Record, the Commonwealth and the Capital. From the latter post he went to the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, in 1883, first as contributing editor, and for the last eighteen years of his life as managing editor. Conducting a metropolitan newapaper gave him the broad field for which he had prepared himself, and in which he gained a reputation that was conspicuous and a fame...

Biography of Frank H. Roberts

Frank H. Roberts is proprietor and editor of the Oskaloosa Independent. The Independent enjoys distinction among Kansas newspapers. It was established in 1860 by his father, the late John W. Roberts. It had been published continuously and successfully during all the intervening years by father and son. No other newspaper in Kansas had been published so many years in one locality. The town let in Oskaloosa where John W. Roberts began his pioneer enterprise as a newspaper publisher fifty-seven years ago is still the site of the present plant of the Independent, and in this quality of permanence and stability, hardly any other institution excels the Independent. The present proprietor of the paper was born at Waynesville in Warren County, Ohio, July 25, 1851. His paternal ancestors came originally from England. There were three Roberts brothers, all of whom settled in New Jersey in Colonial times. The grandfather, John Roberts, was born in 1790 and was a pioneer settler in Western Ohio, following farming there, and acquiring ownership of an entire section of land. An important feature of the Roberts farm in Montgomery County, Ohio, was two large maple sugar orchards. John W. Roberts, whose name is one that will always command respect in the annals of Kansas journalism, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, in 1826. He grew up in his native locality but was married in Warren County. At Waynesville for a number of years he published a weekly newspaper and a monthly literary journal. In July, 1860, he came to Oskaloosa, Kansas, and established the Oskaloosa Independent. To this paper he gave the best energies and...

Biography of John M. Morley

John M. Morley has devoted practically his untire career to the business of banking, is one of the largest private bankers in Northeastern Kansas, is sole owner of the Bank of Severance and is also president of the State Bank of Purcell. Born at Mason in Warren County, Ohio, November 23, 1852, he is of Catholic parentage and ancestry, His grandfather, John Morley, was born in County Mayo, Ireland, and spent his life there as a farmer. Boger Morley, father of John M., was a territorial pioneer in Kansas. Born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1829, he came to this country in 1850 and lived at Mason, Ohio, until March, 1858, when he arrived in the territory of Kansas and located a tract of land which he developed as a high class farm near Severance in Doniphan County. With the management and cultivation of that farm he was busied until the close of his life on January 20, 1912. Politically he acted as a democrat and was a loyal member of the Catholic Church. During the Civil war he was enrolled in the State Militia and was called out several times to protect the border and also during Price’s raid in Kansas. Roger Morley married Margaret Kilkenney, who was born in County Mayo, Ireland, in 1830 and died in Doniphan County in 1897. They were married in Clincinnati, Ohio. Their children were: John M.; James, who lives on his farm three miles south of Severance; Anna M., wife of Joseph Devereux, a farmer three miles south of Severance; Catherine, wife of Phillip Bower, a farmer near Troy in Doniphan...

Biography of Charles O. Stockslager

One of the leading representatives of the bench of Idaho is Judge Charles O. Stockslager, now presiding over the courts of the fourth judicial district. He maintains his residence in Hailey, and in that city and throughout this section of the state is widely known as a jurist of marked ability, whose “even-handed justice” has won him “golden opinions'” from the bar and from the general public. A native of Indiana, he was born in Harrison County, February 8, 1847, and is a son of Captain Jacob Stockslager, whose birth occurred in Virginia and who won his title in gallant service in the American army during the hostilities with Mexico. He was married in the Old Dominion to Miss Jane W. Newell, also a native of Virginia, and later they removed to Indiana, becoming owners of a farm near the homestead of William Henry Harrison. When a young man Captain Stockslager engaged in boating on the Ohio River for several years, then devoted his energies to agricultural pursuits, and subsequently carried on merchandising. He also served his county as sheriff for several terms and was a loyal and progressive citizen, who lived an honorable and upright life and won the regard of all with whom he came in contact. He was called to his final reward at the age of eighty-four years, and his wife died at the age of seventy-six years. They were parents of four children, three of whom are living. Two of the sons loyally served their country in the civil war. The eldest, S. M. Stockslager, was a captain in the Thirteenth Indiana Cavalry, has...

Biography of Thomas C. Biddle, M. D.

Thomas C. Biddle, M. D. Superintendent of the State Hospital for the Insane at Topeka, Doctor Biddle had long been prominent in his profession in Kansas, where he had practiced as a private physiclan or in connecton with the public service for thirty-five years. His name is well known among the profession not only over Kansas, but his work as superintendent of hospitals for the insane had attracted favorable attention over the country at large. He belongs to a prominent family, of the same branch that produced Nicholas Biddle, one of the first secretaries of the treasury, and many other historic characters. Doctor Biddle is in the fifth generation removed from John Biddle, who founded the family in Maryland, locating in Cecil County of that province as early as 1867. The old home was near the headwaters of the Elk and Bohemia Rivers, both tributaries of the Chesapeake. Doctor Biddle was born in Putnam County, Indiana, September 14, 1857, and was the youngest of a large family born to Richard and Catherine Elizabeth (Jones) Biddle. His father was born near Paris, Bourbon County, Kentucky, and spent his life as a farmer. He was married October 3, 1827, at Shelbyville, Kentucky, and in May, 1831, moved to Putnam County, Indiana, where he lived until his death in February, 1888. His wife was born in Shelbyville, Kentucky, November 9, 1811, and died in Putnam County, Indiana, July 12, 1881. Both parents were members of the Methodist Church. A brief record of the twelve older children is as follows: James Taylor, who was a farmer in Fountain County, Indiana, where he died...
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