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Biography of J. W. Searson, Prof.

It is a laudable aim of educational institutions continually to bring solidity and scholarship to their teaching boards, thereby adding greatness to their organizations and at the same time making certain the wider diffusion of knowledge. The Kansas State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, Kansas, had pursued this course in the selection of its faculty, with the result that some of the ablest and most enlightened educators of the country devote their time and efforts to this progressive institution. Among these mention may be particularly made of Prof. J. W. Searson who, for the past six years, had occupied the chair of English. J. W. Searson was born on a farm near Grand Island, Nebraska, in 1873. His educational training began early in the country schools, after which he pursued academic and collegiate courses. When only twenty-six years old he received his Master’s degree from the University of Nebraska, having won his Bachelor’s degree in the previous years, entering the university after being graduated from the Grand Island High School in 1891. He had since been working for his Doctor’s degree. Mr. Searson entered the educational field as an instructor very early and his abilities soon won definite recognition. In 1894-95 he was principal of the Weeping Water High School, and from 1896 to 1898 he was a teaching fellow in the department of history in the University of Nebraska. In 1899 he accepted the position of instructor in history in the high school of Lincoln, Nebraska, and for six years following, was superintendent of the city schools of Wahoo, Nebraska. This mutually pleasant association was broken in 1905 when...

Biography of William Clarence Howie

Out of the depths of his mature wisdom Carlyle wrote, “History is the essence of innumerable biographies,” and Macaulay has said, “The history of a nation is best told in the lives of its people.” It is therefore fitting that the sketches of Idaho’s eminent and distinguished men should find a place in this volume, and to the number belongs William Clarence Howie, a prominent lawyer of Mountain Home. A native of Iowa, he was born in Davis County, near the Missouri state line, November 27, 1860. The Howie family originated in France. Two brothers, who were French Huguenots, were driven out of that country on account of their religious views and fled to Scotland, one locating in the highlands, the other in the lowlands. From the latter our subject is descended. He founded a family in Scotland that became renowned in the history of that country, many representatives of the name occupying prominent positions in public life. John Howie, the father of our subject, was born on Prince Edwards island. His parents had started for America, and in a storm the vessel on which they sailed sought refuge in the harbor of the island, whereon occurred the birth of the son. On reaching the New World the grandparents located in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, and later the grandfather removed to Illinois, where he died in the eighty-ninth year of his age. John Howie was reared and educated in Pennsylvania, and there married Miss Hannah Evans, who was of English and Holland ancestry. Mr. Howie was a farmer, and with his family removed to Michigan. Later he returned to Pennsylvania...

Duby, William – Obituary

Baker, Oregon William Duby, former chairman of the Oregon State Highway commission died at his home in Baker last Tuesday night and funeral services were held at the Christian Church, Baker, Friday afternoon, under the auspices of the Masonic Lodge. Mr. Duby was born in East St. Louis, Illinois. In August 1861, said the Baker Democrat Herald. He went to Nebraska with his mother in 1865 and lived in the eastern part of that state until he was 22 years old. Mr. Duby was married to Mary E. Bissell in Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska, October 5, 1895. The young couple moved to Centralia, Washington, where they lived for 14 years. Mr. Duby was engaged in the logging and lumber business there. Mr. Duby came to Baker County in 1903 and located on a ranch in the Lower Powder valley, where he engaged in the cattle business for three years. He then moved to Baker and purchased the Baker Packing company which he operated until 1916. Mr. Duby was elected county judge of Baker County in 1917 and served in that office until Jan. 1, 1921. In 1923 he was appointed by Governor Walter M. Pierce as a member of the state highway commission. He was chairman of that body during his entire four years on the commission. Judge Duby was secretary-treasurer of the Cattle and Horse raisers association of Oregon from the time of its organization 17 years ago until his death. He was active in the work of the Oregon Wool Growers-association following the passage of the “? Line cowboy” bill in 1929. Mr. Duby was appointed as...

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