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Hackleman Family Record

This is a transcript of the first 31 pages of Elijah Hackleman’s Scrap book No. 2. The original is in the Wabash County Indiana Historical Museum. Although material of genealogical significance is to be found throughout the scrapbook, the material following deals with the Hackleman family. Michael Hackleman was born in Germany about the year 1720. He migrated to America in the seventeenth year of his age (1737) and was bound to a Maryland, or Pennsylvania farmer for three years to pay for his passage. He finally cleared twenty-six acres of land, and squared the account. He married Mary Sailors in March of 1751, and settled on the Susquehanna River, near the line of Pennsylvania and Maryland. He later in life moved to the Abbeville District, South Carolina where he died in 1808. His children were named Jacob, Lydia, Conrad, John and George.

Biography of Thomas Azro Noftzger

Thomas Azro Noftzger had long been successfully identified with the legal profession in Kansas, and is now senior member of the firm of Noftzger & Gardner, with offices in the Beacon Building at Wichita. His partner is Mr. George Gardner. Mr. Noftzger was born November 15, 1861, in Jackson Township of Kosciusko County, Indiana. His father, Levi J. Noftzger, was born September 3, 1836, and is still living at the age of four score. The mother, Mary C. Noftzger, also living, was born September 2, 1840. Party through the liberality of his parents and partly through his own ambitious determination Thomas A. Noftzger gained a liberal education. In 1883, at the age of twenty-two, he completed the course in the department of litsrature, science and the arts at the University of Michigan, graduating with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. He soon afterward took up the study of law at Fort Wayne, Indiana, in the office of Robertson and Harper, and after his admission to the bar began active practice, and in 1884 came to Kansas and located at Anthony, where he continued to reside until 1912. He had practiced in this state steadily and had won a high reputation by the excellent ability in handling many cases of importance. In the way of public service he had served as city attorney of Anthony, as county attorney of Harper County, Kansas, and from 1901 to 1909 was senator, representing the Twenty-seventh Senatorial district. He is an active republican, a Mason, a Knights of Pythias and Elk. At Wabash, Indiana, November 15, 1886, he married Lelia K. Kidd. Her father,...

Biography of Edgar Watson Howe

Edgar Watson Howe. Kansas journalism had produced several men whose names are household words in America. By no means least among them in attainments and influence is Edgar Watson Howe, founder of the Atchison Globe, for many years its editor and publisher, and now in his semi-retirement publishing Howe’s Monthly. His many colleagues and admirers in the newspaper profession have for years been accustomed to referring to him as “Old Ed Howe.” As a matter of fact he is not even now an old man. Mr. Howe was born near Treaty, Indiana, May 3, 1854, and is of English descent. His ancestors came to New York during the period of the Revolution. His father, Henry Howe, was born at New Philadelphia, Ohio, in 1835, was reared there, and was an early settler at Treaty, Indiana. He was a very positive character and a man of prominence in whatever locality he lived. In Indiana he was a farmer, a school teacher, and a cirenit rider of the Methodist Church. In 1856 the whole family journeyed by wagon from Indiana to Harrison County, Missouri, and there again Henry Howe took up the work of the pioneer farmer, and built a church on his land and preached every Sunday without pay. Subsequently he traveled about the country and at the opening of Oklahoma Territory he acquired a quarter section of land where Oklahoma City now stands. From there he removed to Hot Springs, Arkansas, and came to Atchison, a few weeks before his death, which occurred in 1908. In the years before the war he was an abolitionist, when open advocacy of...

Biography of Cecil K. Reiff

Cecil K. Reiff, principal of the Central high school at Muskogee, was born in Wabash county, Indiana, October 23, 1888, and is a son of Jacob and Catherine (Baer) Reiff, the former a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, while the latter was born in Ohio. The father was but thirteen years of age when he was brought to America by his parents, the family home being established in Ohio, where he completed his education and afterward took up the occupation of tilling the soil. During the period of the Civil war he served on guard duty near Washington, D. C., and following the close of hostilities he went to Wabash county, Indiana, where he purchased and improved land that he cultivated to the time of his death, which occurred in March, 1895, when he was fifty-one years of age. His widow survives and is yet occupying the old home place. Cecil K. Reiff was reared in Wabash county, Indiana, where he attended the rural schools and afterward the high school at North Manchester, that state. Later he spent, a year as a student in the North Manchester College and then attended the Indiana University, from which he received the Master of Arts degree. He has also attended the Chicago University and Columbia University of New York city, availing himself of every opportunity to promote his knowledge and thus advance his efficiency as an educator. In early manhood he took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for six years in Wabash county, Indiana, and in the fall of 1915 he came to Muskogee as head of the commercial department...

Biography of William S. Tyner

William S. Tyner was one of the early settlers of Kansas, though he lived in the state only a few years, but founded a family which had become especially well known and prominent in Osage County. The Tyners were an old and prominent family of Indiana. William S. Tyner was one of seven sons and was born on a farm in Rush County, Indiana, September 20, 1820. His parents were John and Nancy (Sailors) Tyner, both Indiana people. William S. Tyner was a consin of James N. Tyner, who served as postmaster-general under President Hayes. The early education of William S. Tyner was acquired in the district school of Rush County. When he was nineteen years of age his family removed to Wabash County in that state. In 1842 William Hyner married Mary Washburn of Indiana. Six children were born to their union: Milton, deceased; Helen, Mrs. Hiza Wilson of Michigan Valley, Kansas; Jonas of California; Willis H. of Lyndon; Arminda, who lives on the old homestead in Indiana; Edgar, deceased; and Melvin of Arcadia, Tennessee. The Indiana home of William S. Tyner for many years was a 160-acre farm. There he and his wife reared their family. In 1869 he followed two of his older sons, Milton and Jonas, to Kansas, located on a farm of a quarter section in Douglas County. In Douglas County he became prominent as a citizen and did much to build up that country in the years following the war. He was very active on the farm and in community affairs until the death of his wife in 1884. He then returned to...

Bowman, Dorcas Tabitha Simonton – Obituary

Mrs. Dorcas Bowman, 83, passed away this morning at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Edith Barnell, 504 North Prospect Street, after being ill for a period of seven weeks. She was born in LaGro, Ind., on August 3, 1856, the child of John R. and Mary Simonton. In 1876 [May 12, 1877} she was married to Sylvester Bowman in Shydler, Ind. For the past 30 years, however, she has made her home in Sturgis, where she was a member of the Gospel Hall. She is survived by her husband, who is living with a son in LeRoy, Mich.; five sons, Edson R. of Sturgis, Reube of LeRoy, Frank A. of near Centerville, Roscoe M. of Camp Custer, and Coering of Flint; one daughter, Mrs. Edith Barnett of Sturgis; 22 grandchildren, and 17 great grandchildren. Friends are being received at the Moon Funeral Home where services will be conducted Monday afternoon at 1 o’clock, with Rev. Walter Jacobs officiating. Interment will be made in the Oak Lawn Cemetery. Contributed by: Shelli...

Biographical Sketch of Oliver, J. W.

Oliver, J. W. dealer in general line of dry goods, notions, clothing, boots and shoes, hats and caps, and groceries. He opened the trade June 6, 1879, under the firm name of Oliver & Michaelis, and changed to the present style in January 1882. He occupies rooms 22×72 feet, first floor and basement; carries an average stock of $18,000. He came to Russell in May 1877, and engaged in the hotel business until March 1879. He was born in Wabash County, Ind., in 1840; lived on a farm until twenty-one years old; he then enlisted in Company H, Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; participated in all the battles of his command until detailed to division headquarters. He was in Sherman’s campaigns in the South; detailed as Second Lieutenant; mustered out in the spring of 1865. He then engaged in merchandising in Clinton, Ill, until he came to Kansas. He was married in June 1881, to Rebecca Billingsly, of Axtel, Kan. They have one son – Benjamin M. Mr. Oliver is a member of the A. O. U. W., of Russell,...

Biography of Hon. P. A. Marquam

Hon. P. A. Marquam was born near Baltimore, Maryland, February 28, 1823, and is the eighth child in a family of nine children of Philip Winchester and Charlotte Mercer (Poole), Marquam. His grandfather was a wealthy merchant of England, employing many ships in carrying on an extensive trade. His father was born in England but at the age of twenty came to America. His mother was a daughter of Henry Poole, a wealthy planter, on whose plantation now stands Poolville, Maryland. On account of sickness and financial misfortune the father of our subject soon after his marriage decided to leave Maryland with the hope of bettering his fortune, and to seek a new home in the west. With his family he first settled in Ohio, but shortly moved to Lafayette, Indiana. Here the family settled on unimproved government land, where a rude home was erected and pioneer life commenced. At the end of a few years, by the united labors of father and sons a greater portion of the wild tract upon which they had settled was cleared. By this time Mr. Marquam’s elder brothers had left home to seek their own fortunes, leaving him at home to assist in the support of the family. Being the youngest of the boys and naturally strong and vigorous he was naturally selected as the one to remain upon the farm. If, however, he cheerfully accepted his lot it was not without a strong determination to make of himself something more than the prospects held out to the average farmer’s boy in a new and undeveloped country. The circumstances which surrounded him...

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