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Peace Attempts with Western Prairie Indians, 1833

What was known as the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into in Mississippi with the Choctaw Indians September 27, 1830;1 pursuant to the terms of the treaty, in 1832 the movement of the Choctaw to their new home between the Canadian and Red rivers was under way but they were in danger from incursions of the Comanche and Pani Picts2 or Wichita, and the Kiowa tribe, who came east as far as the Washita and Blue rivers; these Indians had also evinced a hostile attitude toward white citizens and had attacked and plundered Santa Fe traders, trappers, and other unprotected travelers. A party of twelve traders had left Santa Fe in December, 1832, under Judge Carr of Saint Louis for their homes in Missouri. Their baggage and about ten thousand dollars in specie were packed upon mules. They were descending the Canadian River when, near the present town of Lathrop in the Panhandle of Texas, they were attacked by an overwhelming force of Comanche and Kiowa Indians. Two of the men, one named Pratt, and the other Mitchell, were killed; and after a siege of thirty-six hours the survivors made their escape at night on foot, leaving all their property in possession of the Indians. The party became separated and after incredible hardship and suffering five of them made their way to the Creek settlements on the Arkansas and to Fort Gibson where they found succor. Of the other five only two survived. The money secured by the Indians was the first they had ever seen.3 Colonel Arbuckle on May 6, ordered4 a military force to Red...

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also wrote, at his dictation, his journals concerning his voyages. Shortly after the marriage of Columbus and Felipa at Lisbon, they moved to the island of Porto Santo which her father had colonized and was governor at the time of his death, and settled on a large landed estate which belonged to Palestrello, and which he had bequeathed to Felipa together with all his journals and papers. In that home of retirement and peace the young husband and wife lived in connubial bliss for many years. How could it be otherwise, since each had found in the other a congenial spirit, full of adventurous explorations, but which all others regarded as visionary follies? They read together and talked over the journals and papers of Bartolomeo, during which Felipa also entertained Columbus with accounts of her own voyages with her father, together with his opinions and those of other navigators of that age his friends and companions of a possible country that might be discovered in the distant West, and the...

Treaty of September 5, 1820

Articles of a convention made and concluded, between Benjamin Parke, a Commissioner on the part of the United States, for that purpose, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the Tribe of Kickapoos of the Vermilion, of the other part. Article I. It is agreed, that the annuity secured to the said Tribe, by the Treaty of the thirtieth of August, eighteen hundred and nineteen, shall hereafter be paid to the said Tribe at Kaskaskias, in the state of Illinois. Article II. As the said Tribe are now about leaving their settlements on the Wabash, and have desired some assistance to enable them to remove, the said Benjamin Parke, on behalf of the United States, has paid and advanced to the said Tribe, two thousand dollars, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged; which said sum of two thousand dollars, is to be considered as an equivalent, in full, for the annuity due the said Tribe, by virtue of the aforesaid Treaty, for the year eighteen hundred and twenty-one. In testimony whereof, the said Benjamin Parke, commissioner as aforesaid, and the chiefs, warriors, and head men, of the said tribe, have hereunto set their hands, at Vincennes, the fifth day of September, eighteen hundred and twenty. B. Parke Wagohaw, his x mark Tecumsena, his x mark Pelecheah, his x mark Kechemaqua, his x mark Paca Rinqua, her x mark Katewah, his x mark Nasa Reah, his x mark In presence of William Prince, Indian Agent Samuel Jacobs R. S. Reynolds George R. C. Sullivan, Vincennes Postmaster Toussaint Dubois Michael Brouillet,...

Biographical Sketch of John Pitcher

An old and highly respected settler, being one of the original forty-niners coming across the plains from St. Louis in ox teams. He was born July 25, 1827 at Vincennes, Indiana; and has resided in San Mateo County for the past 55 years. Mr. Pitcher has the distinction of being the oldest public official, holding the office of Justice of Peace, for the past 35 years. Mr. Pitcher has been very successful during his stay in Halfmoon Bay, acquiring a large farm, town property in San Francisco and many other interests. Mr. Pitcher is today, what he has always been, a man true to himself, true to nature, and true to his...

A Brotherhood Of Cutthroats

Wednesday, Nov. 3, 1819.–Left Miller’s tavern at 7 o’clock and arrived at Squire Chambers’ at 6 o’clock, after traveling a distance of thirty-six miles. Passed a trifling village, Fredericksburg; also Greenville. A poor, barren, deserted country. For ten miles, stony, poor, mountainous and naked. Land a little better. Miserable huts, poor accommodations, cabin taverns, and high charges. Crossed Blue river. Every man his own hostler and steward. Plenty of game–deer, turkeys, etc. Inhabitants generally possess a smaller share of politeness than any met with before. Thursday, Nov. 4.–Left Squire Chambers’ (who is only member of the assembly, by the by) at 7 o’clock a. m. Arrived at Lewis’ at 6 o’clock, a distance of twenty-five miles. Passed a little village called Peola. The fact that this part of Indiana is a late purchase by the United States, accounts for its towns being so inconsiderable and being made up of log houses. The lands here are very fertile, the country mountainous and broken. Traveled twenty-five miles through woods and passed but four houses. With great difficulty obtained water for our horses. In the midst of one of those long and thick pieces of woods, we passed one of the most miserable huts ever seen–a house built out of slabs without a nail; the pieces merely laid against a log pen such as pigs are commonly kept in, a dirt floor, no chimney. Indeed, the covering would be a bad one in the heat of summer, and, unfortunately, the weather at this time is very severe for the season of the year. This small cabin contained a young and interesting female...

Biography of John C. Waymeyer

JOHN C. WAYMEYER. Special adaptability to any particular calling in life is the one necessary adjunct to permanent success. No matter the vim and determination which characterizes a man’s start in business, unless he is to the manner born he will find to his sorrow that his line has been falsely cast, and the quicker he draws aside and takes up another calling the better will it be for him. That John C. Waymeyer is especially fitted for the calling that now occupies his attention, that of merchant, cannot be doubted, for he has a large trade which is rapidly increasing. Mr. Waymeyer is a Hoosier by birth, first seeing the light in Davis County February 18, 1851, and the son of William and Henrietta Waymeyer, both natives of Germany. Led by the promises of the Western prairies of this country, the parents sold out and crossed the ocean to America in 1848, settling in Indiana. There the father followed farming until his death in 1861. The mother is still living, and makes her home on a farm eighteen miles east of Van Buren. She came to this county in 1870 and settled where she now lives. She is now the wife of Fred Richenmeyer. Our subject was one of four children and the only one reared, the others dying young. He obtained a liberal education in the schools of Indiana and after leaving school he began clerking in a store in Vincennes. Later he went with his mother and step-father to Carter County, Missouri, and worked on the farm. Three years later, or in 1873, he began working...

Biography of William A. Hopkins

William A. Hopkins, now living retired at Solomon, had turned the seventy-fifth milepost on life’s journey. His years have accounted for something not only to himself but to his country and his community. He was a gallant and loyal soldier of the Union during more than three years of the Civil war. After his part in that struggle he came to Kansas and had been a resident of Dickinson County for practically half a century. The Solomon community esteems him not only as one of its oldest but one of its most highly respected citizens. An Indiana man by birth, he was born in a log house situated on a farm in Daviess County September 12, 1842. His parents were Zelek and Maria (Logan) Hopkins. Zelek Hopkins was born in Kentucky in 1807, a son of Washington E. Hopkins. This is the same branch of the Hopkins fainily which includes among its noted members Commodore Hopkins of the English navy. Zelek Hopkins went with his parents from Kentucky to Indiana when ten years of age and grew up on a pioneer farm in Daviess County. His active career was spent as a farmer and during the Civil war he served as provost marshal of Daviess County. His death occurred at Washington, Indiana, March 20, 1867. In 1829 he married Miss Maria Logan, who was born in 1807, a danghter of David Logan, a native of Ireland and a weaver by trade. Mra. Maria Hopkins died in 1901 at Solomon, Kansas, at the advanced age of ninety-four. She was the mother of eleven children, five sons and six daughters. Their...

Biographical Sketch of Charles Harris

Harris, Charles; university prof.; born Albion, Ill., Nov. 19, 1859; son of George and Catherine Smith Harris; A. B., Indiana University, 1879; Ph. D., University of Leipzig. 1883; married. Mary McCalla, of Bloomington, Ind., Dec. 24, 1884; teacher in academy, Vincennes, Ind., 1883-1886; prof. French and German, Southern Illinois State Normal School, 1886-1888; prof. German, Oberlin College, 1888-1893, Western Reserve University, since 1893; member Modern Language Assn, America. Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Psi; Episcopalian. Author: German Composition, 1890; German Lessons, 1892; German Reader, 1895. Editor: Wichert’s An der Majorsecke, 1895; Goethe’s Poems, 1899; Lessing’s Hamburgische Dramaturgie (abridged edit.), 1901. Contributor to...

Biography of Charles S. Huffman, M. D.

Charles S. Huffman, M. D. It is unusual for a medical man to become so widely and prominently identified with state affairs as Dr. Charles S. Huffman, of Columbus. Doctor Huffman is also a state senator, having represented his district in the State Senate for twelve years. On account of his long and arduous participation in the state militia, beginning with service in the famous Kansas Regiment during the Spanish-American war, he had attained the rank of brigade commander, and is one of the most active figures in the National Guard of the state. He made his mark in the world as a physician first, and had been for more than a quarter of a century actively identified with the profession at Columbus. He was born in the historic Vincennes, Indiana, October 8, 1865. In his ancestry both in maternal and paternal lines can be found Revolutionary soldiers, and thus he inherits his interest in military affairs. Doctor Huffman served as assistant surgeon, with the rank of captain, in the Twentieth Kansas Regiment during the Spanish-American and Philippine wars, having enlisted in April, 1898. He was a member of Colonel Funston’s staff. He spent eighteen months in the service, and was mustered out at San Francisco, October 28, 1899. Since then he had never lost a keen interest in the National Guard, and had passed through all the grades of service and is now a brigade commander. His early youth was spent in the vicinity of old Vincennes, and he attended the public schools there, graduating from high school in 1883. Doctor Huffman is one of the early settlers...

Biography of Thomas A. Stevens, M. D.

Thomas A. Stevens, M. D. In the great majority of cases, heredity has no rights which the biographers of successful Americans, especially those of the West, feel called upon to respect. However, in shaping the course of some men it wields a distinct influence, and must be noted when the tendency born in a man is nurtured by an ever-present force in the same lines, crowding other avenues of thought and compelling devotion to a certain vocation or profession. Heredity, supplementing environment and training, has had much to do in shaping the career of Dr. Thomas A. Stevens, a leading physician and surgeon of Caney. Not only his father, but his maternal grandfather, were physicians before him, and the predilection for his calling that has contributed so greatly to his success is but his natural inheritance from men of professional skill and zeal. Doctor Stevens was born at Corydon, the county seat of Harrison County, Indiana, March 14, 1856, a son of J. D. and Margaret A. (Johnson) Stevens. J. D. Stevens was born in 1835, at Corydon, of Scotch-Irish and French parents, was prepared for his profession at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating from the latter with the class of 1867, and commenced practice at Vincennes, Indiana, whence he had removed in 1860. He successfully followed his profession for many years in Indiana, but in the evening of life came to Kansas, where his death occurred, at Peru, in 1913. He was married in 1855 to Margaret A. Johnson, who was born at Vincennes, Indiana, of Scotch and French descent, daughter of...
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