Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Hon. George B. Rogers

Some men achieve success almost instantaneously, some by slow accretion, others only after long and patient working and waiting. The experience of men who are willing to work persistently and intelligently and wait calmly goes to prove that success may surely be attained during an ordinary lifetime, and no man not cut off at an untimely age need work and wait in vain. These reflections have been suggested by a consideration of the career of Hon. George B. Rogers, receiver of the United States land office at Blackfoot, Idaho, who is one of the most prominent and successful citizens of the state. He was born in Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin, February 22, 1842. His father, John Rogers, was born in England and there married Miss Hannah Bailey. They came to the United States in 1837, bringing with them two daughters, named Susan and Elizabeth, and located at Mineral Point, Wisconsin, where Mr. Rogers engaged in lead-mining and later became a farmer. He died in 1880, aged seventy-six years, and his wife passed away in 1882, aged seventy-three. They were lifelong members and supporters of the Methodist Episcopal church. Six more children were born to them in Wisconsin, of whom George B. Rogers was the second in order of nativity and of whom two others are living. George B. Rogers was brought up on his father’s farm and at a tender age gained an intimate acquaintance with hard work and long hours. The winter schools of that day and locality were poor, but such as they were he attended as opportunity presented, and later he attended night schools, but he...

Biography of Dan Feour

Among the sons of the Pine Tree state who have found homes in the northwest and whose history forms an integral part of the record of the development of the rich mining interests of southern Idaho is Dan Feour. He was born in Aroostook County, Maine, June 9, 1850, a son of William and Catherine Feour. His father was born in Ireland, and when a young man came to the United States. He died in the fiftyfourth year of his age, and his wife departed this life at the age of fortyfour years. They were the parents of five children, four of whom are yet living. Dan Feour was reared to manhood in Boston, Massachusetts, and acquired a good practical education in the public schools of that city. He then learned the machinist’s trade, and for some time worked in the Grover & Baker sewing machine factory. In 1865 he cast in his lot with the settlers on the Pacific coast, and has borne no unimportant part in the development of this section of the country. By way of the isthmus of Panama he made his way to California and there engaged in mining until 1869, when he went to White Pine, Nevada, and thence to the Squaw creek, Washington, and Victoria, British Columbia, attracted by the discovery of gold at those places. In 1875 Mr. Feour arrived in Owyhee County, where he has since engaged in mining, meeting with excellent success in his undertakings. He has also prospected in other parts of the state, and prosperity has attended his labors. In 1879 he sold the St. John mine...

Biography of A. C. Campbell

A.C. CAMPBELL. – The respect Mr. Campbell commands in his community as a man of honesty and integrity, and as one who has acquired a very enviable competency by hard knocks and straightforward dealings, reminds one of Longfellow’s famous blacksmith; but, although Mr. Campbell has for years upon years listened to the “measured beat and slow’ of his hammer on the anvil, he no longer appears with leathern apron and bare, brown arms, because he is now settled down in a comfortable home, and in the midst of his loving family living happily by other and less arduous pursuits than blacksmithing. He an contemplate with pleasure the means which he has accomplished by industry and determination. He is one of the pioneers of the county, and as such should not be passed over with a mere casual mention. If there is any one class of men more than another entitled to the admiration of everyone, it is that known as the “early pioneers.” They were men possessed of more character, hardihoood and genuine bravery than any other class of men living, and possessed a versatility which seemed to fit them particularly for the life of a pioneer, – to subdue and have dominion. It by no means follows that all men who came to the coast in “early days” were pioneers of this stamp. “Those were the times that tried men’s souls;” and only the ones possessed of an adaminatine spirit were successful and prosperous. Every man’s nerve was put to the test, – his honor tried, his spirit of determination proved and only the ones who came through...

Biography of Sir James Douglas, K. C. B.

SIR JAMES DOUGLAS, K.C.B. – The first governor of British Columbia is worthy of more than a passing notice in this work. With a peculiar though undesigned poetical fitness, he first came to the land of his fame on the famous old steamer Beaver. On her he came to Esquaimalt harbor in the summer of 1849. He had gone from Fort Vancouver, where he had been head clerk, to be chief factor of the Hudson’s Bay Company in British Columbia. Having founded the city of Victoria, he made his home there, conducting with great ability the work of the company. In 1849 the first governor, Blanchard, had arrived from England; but owing to ill health he resigned in two years and returned home. Douglas was appointed his successor, and took the oath of office in November, 1851. His first official act was to summon all the Indians around Victoria, and pay them in full for their lands. This was one of the numerous similar acts which showed the strong sense of justice possessed by the man. On the other hand, he conducted a most vigorous administration. He restrained outbreaks with a strong hand, and brought offenders to justice with prompt impartiality. The result was that acts of injustice and violence were rare, though a ruffian horde from California tried to manage affairs to suit themselves. But the Governor was firm as a rock with the lawless crew, and exercised an almost despotic sway, which, to his great credit be it said, was never abused. In 1857 his commission as governor was renewed for another term of six years. He...

Pin It on Pinterest