Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Phineas Lawrence Windsor

Phineas Lawrence Windsor, librarian of the University of Illinois, is one of the ablest men of his profession in the state. He is a native of Illinois, and had a wide experience in library work both in the East and West before he entered upon his present duties. He was assistant in the New York State Library in 1899, and from 1900 to 1903 was in the copyright office in the Library of Congress. From 1904 to 1909 Mr. Windsor held the post of librarian to the University of Texas at Austin. He then accepted his present duties as librarian and director of the Library School of the University of Illinois. In 1913 he was president of the Illinois Library Association, is a life member of the American Library Association and a member of its council from 1909 to 1913, and is a member of the Bibliographical Society of America. In 1904 he edited the Handbook of Texas Libraries and has been a frequent contributor to library publications. Mr. Windsor was born at Chenoa in McLean County, Illinois, February 21, 1871, a son of Rev. John Alexander and Amy (Arnold) Windsor. He acquired a liberal education, graduating Ph. B. from Northwestern University at Evanston in 1895, during 1897-99 was a student in the New York State Library School at Albany, and during 1899-1900 was a student in the Albany Law School and a member of the staff of the New York State Library. Mr. Windsor married, January 1, 1902, Miss Margaret Fursman Boynton of Lockport, New York. He is a member of the Delta Tau Delta College Fraternity, the...

Biographical Sketch of Harold North Fowler

Fowler, Harold North; university prof.; born, Westfield, Mass., Feb. 25, 1859; son of Samuel and Maria Jones Fowler; A. B., Harvard, 1880; studied American School Classical Studies, Athens, 1882-1883, Universities Bonn and Berlin, 1883-1885; Ph. D., Bonn, 1885; married, Helen, daughter of ex-Gov. Charles H. Bell, of Exeter, N. H., Dec. 23, 1890; instr. Harvard, 1885-1888; prof. Phillips Exeter Academy, 1888-1892; prof. Greek, University of Texas, 1892-1893; College for Women, Western Reserve University, since 1893; prof. Greek language and literature, American School Classical Studies, Athens, 1903-1904; editor-in-chief American Journal of Archaeology since 1906; corr. mem. Kaiserlich Duetsches Archaol. Institut. Editor: Thucydides, Book V., 1888; Plautus, Menaechmi, 1889; Quintus Curtius, Books III and IV, 1890; Allen and Greenough’s Ovid, 1891. Joint Author: Tuell and Fowler’s First Book in Latin, 1893; Tuell and Fowler’s Beginner’s Book in Latin, 1900; Fowler and Wheeler’s Handbook of Greek Archaeology, 1909. Author: History of Ancient Greek Literature, 1902; History of Roman Literature, 1903. Contbr. classical subjects to revs. and...

Biography of Middleton L. Perry, M. D.

Middleton L. Perry, M. D. Among the men of Kansas who are carrying on the highly important work of caring for the afflicted and irresponsible members of society, one of the best known is Dr. Middleton L. Perry, superintendent of the State Hospital for Epilepties, at Parsons. Doctor Perry was born at Lancaster, Dallas County, Texas, August 15, 1868, and is a son of Middleton and Ellen (Ellis) Perry. The family is of English extraction and settled during colonial times in Virginia, where the grandfather of Doctor Perry, Franklin Perry, was born. He was a farmer by vocation and in young manhood moved to Illinois, where he became a pioneer of Greene County and there continued his agricultural pursuits until his death which occurred before the birth of his grandson. Middleton Perry was born in 1814, in Indiana, but as a boy was taken to Illinois, where, in Greene County, he was educated, reared and married. In that state he followed farming, but in 1844, when thirty years of age, went to Texas as a homesteader, and that state continued to be his home until his death, which occurred at Lancaster, in 1892. Mr. Perry took part in the stirring happenings that occurred in the formative era of the Lone Star State and endured the privations and hardships incident to pioneer settlement, and was considered one of the sturdy and self-reliant men of his day who assisted in the development of his adopted commonwealth. He was an industrious man, and through hard and constant work became the owner of a valuable property. Politicelly Mr. Perry was a democrat and...

Chandler, Harley Wallace – Obituary

Joseph, Oregon Harley Wallace Chandler died Oct. 22, 2006, at Walla Walla General Hospital. He was 73. Mr. Chandler was born July 10, 1933, in Joseph to Oscar and Gladys Ballantine Chandler. He moved with his family to the Milton-Freewater/Weston area in 1946 and attended schools in Joseph and Milton-Freewater. He graduated from McLoughlin Union High School and earned an associate of arts degree in heating and air conditioning from Walla Walla Commiunity College. Mr. Chandler joined the U.S. Navy at 17 and served in San Diego and in The Philippines. He was discharged from the service and worked two years with the Austin, Texas, city fire department. On June 10, 1966, he and Shirley Castle married in Pasco. He worked many years on area ranches as a farm manager. The Chandlers also owned and operated a house painting business. He enjoyed time with his large, extended family and readily gave a hand to those needing help. He was rarely seen without a smile. Survivors include his wife Shirley; three sisters Frances Wingfield of Enterprise, Myrtle DeLyria of Lostine and Elizabeth Skip McCune of Ellensburg and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by three brothers Richard, Harry and infant Matthew and three sisters Mary Duvall, Florence Duvall French and Alice Key. Services have been held. Memorial may be made to the American Heart Association through the Herring Groseclose Funeral Home, 315 W. Alder St., Walla Walla, Wash. Wallowa County Chieftain – November 9,...

Whitt, Ivan Jim – Obituary

Ivan Jim Whitt, 86, who lived in Baker City before moving to the Tri-Cities area, died December 16, 2005, in the loving arms of his family. He was born April 7, 1915, in Leander, Texas, and resided in Tularosa, New Mexico, until going into the Army in October 1942. Jim served with the 690th Replacement Company throughout the Luzon campaign during World War II. He was discharged in February 1946 and served as an Air Force reservist until January 1960. He lived in Baker City several years before moving to the Tri-Cities. He was a lifetime member of VFW Post 3048 in Baker City and a member of Pipefitters Local 598 in the Tri-Cities. Jim loved to fish, hunt and go camping. His family remembers many wonderful outings with him. He was preceded in death by his mother, Elizabeth Evans Whitt; father, Davis Dolliver Whitt; his former wife and mother of his children, Verla Whitt; brothers, Wiley, Riley, Jess and Johnny Whitt; sister, Corrine; and stepson, Gary Wayne Shankle. He is survived by his wife, Martha of Benton City, Wash.; daughters, Cecile and Gary Horn, Karen and Tom Hoyle; sons, Vernon and Steven; his stepchildren, Jerry and Ila Rae Shankle, Brenda Rohner, Theresa Shankle, Doris Fay Shankle, Phillip and Marilyn Shankle, Norman Shankle and Kathy Baker; five grandchildren, numerous step grandchildren, and several great grandchildren. Formal services will be held at a later date. Visitation will be at Einan’s Funeral Home from noon to 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, December 20, 2005. Memorial contributions may be made in Jim’s memory to Office of Research, P O Box 641033, Washington State University,...

Biography of Smith Deaf Smith

Erastus Smith, better known as “Deaf Smith,” was the son of Chiliab and Mary Smith, and was born in New York on the 19th of April 1787. At the age of eleven years he emigrated with his parents to the Mississippi Territory, and settled near Natchez. His parents were strict members of the Baptist Church, and gave him such moral and intellectual training, as the circumstances around them would permit. He first came to Texas in 1817 likely with some of the patriot forces that were constantly arriving at that time in the Province. He soon, however, returned home; but in 1821 he came again to Texas, for the purpose of making it his home. This he did, never leaving it. He was in the country before Stephen F. Austin, but in what section is not known. His nature was to ramble alone and be by himself. He was not entirely deaf, but unable to hear an ordinary conversation, and if such was going on around him would generally walk away and stand apart, gazing into space. He also had a habit, if anyone addressed him, of putting his finger to his lips, indicating by that, it was supposed, that he was unable to hear the one that addressed him. When the colony under Green DeWitt commenced settling where the town of Gonzales is now located, Smith was one of them, going there in 1825. From there he drifted out to San Antonio, and in that place formed the acquaintance of a handsome young Mexican widow of the fine Castillian type, named Guadalupe Duran. Her maiden name was Ruiz,...

Pin It on Pinterest