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Slave Narrative of Mack Mullen

Interviewer: J. M. Johnson Person Interviewed: Mack Mullen Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 79 Mack Mullen, a former slave who now lives at 521 W. First Street, Jacksonville, Florida, was born in Americus, Georgia in 1857, eight years before Emancipation, on a plantation which covered an area of approximately five miles. Upon this expansive plantation about 200 slaves lived and labored. At its main entrance stood a large white colonial mansion. In this abode lived Dick Snellings, the master, and his family. The Snellings plantation produced cotton, corn, oats, wheat, peanuts, potatoes, cane and other commodities. The live stock consisted primarily of hogs and cattle. There was on the plantation what was known as a “crib,” where oats, corn and wheat were stored, and a “smoke house” for pork and beef. The slaves received their rations weekly, it was apportioned according to the number in the family. Mack Mullen’s mother was named Ellen and his father Sam. Ellen was “house woman” and Sam did the blacksmithing, Ellen personally attended Mrs. Snellings, the master’s wife. Mack being quite young did not have any particular duties assigned to him, but stayed around the Snellings mansion and played. Sometimes “marster” Snellings would take him on his knee and talk to him. Mack remembers that he often told him that some day he was going to be a noble man. He said that he was going to make him the head overseer. He would often give him candy and money and take him in his buggy for a ride. Plantation Life: The slaves lived in cabins called quarters, which were constructed of lumber and...

Biography of Henry Holmes White

Henry Holmes White, President and manager of the Oklahoma Engineering, Machine & Boiler Company and thus identified with one of the leading industrial enterprises of Muskogee, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, December 13, 1868, and is a son of Isaac DuBose and Caroline Octave (Holmes) White. He was educated at the Citadel, the military academy of South Carolina, from which he was graduated with the class of 1889, and, following the completion of his course, he occupied a position as draftsman with the South Carolina Railroad. He thoroughly learned the machinist business in the railroad shops in which he was employed for four years, and the gradual development and expansion of his powers qualified him for positions of larger and larger responsibilities. For a time he was Superintendent of the Light & Power Company at Americus, Georgia, and removed to Belleville, Illinois, where he continued in business along similar lines until November, 1892. In that year he became connected with the Portsmouth (Va.) Gas Company, for which he acted as manager for almost a decade or until April, 1902. In the latter year he went to Belleville, Illinois, where he entered the employ of H. M. Byllesby & Company as manager and in August, 1904, was sent to Enid, Oklahoma, as general manager for the firm. On the 1st of February, 1905, Mr. White was transferred to Muskogee, where he continued to act as general manager and engineer until January, 1910. At that date he transferred his efforts to the Pacific coast, going to Portland, Oregon, where he filled the position of engineer in connection with Pacific coast...

Epps, William Earl “Early” – Obituary

Bogart: William Earl “Early” Epps, 70, of 1691 Jimmy Daniel Road, died Saturday, Nov. 10. A native of Americus, Mr. Epps had lived in Oconee County for 35 years. He was retired from Wellington Corporation and was a veteran of World War II. He was a past Commander of VFW Post #2872 and a member of Amvets Post #10. He was a member of Princeton United Methodist Church. Memorial services will be at3 p.m. today at The Bernstein Funeral Home Chapel. The Rev. Don Cooper will officiate. Survivors include his wife, Mary Epps; two daughters, Connie Epps Bond, Watkinsville, and Judy Epps Akridge, Bogart; a son William Jessie Earl Epps, Athens; three brothers, Thomas J. Epps, Winterville, Oscar Epps Jr., and Gene Epps both of Athens; two sisters, Dorothy Dottery, Watkinsville, and Thelma Norman, Athens; nine grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to the Princeton United Methodist Church building fund or to Extra Special People. Cremated, memorial service on November 11, 1990 at Bernstein Funeral Home. Notes of Connie Epps Bond Paper does not give his entire name “William Jesse Earl Epps, Sr”. son of: Oscar Earl Epps, Sr and Lottie Wallace Epps. Grandson of Early Oscar Epps and Anna L. Herndon Epps. Grandson of Thomas North and Penelope Jennings Epps. GGgrandson of William and Sara Alexander Epps. My dad was born in Sumter Co., GA. His family had moved from Clarke Co., GA to Sumter Co., GA. Later they moved back to Clarke/Madison/Oconee Counties, GA. Dad has a tombstone at Evergreen Memorial Park, Clarke Co., Athens, GA. He...

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