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Biography of Paul Klein, Hon.

Hon. Paul Klein. In the record of business achievements of Allen County’s citizens, the name of Paul Klein occupies a most conspicuous place. His admirable efforts have not only contributed to the growth and development of Iola, of which city he had been a resident since 1903, but his career in regard to public service had been a decidedly creditable one and places him high in the esteem of his fellow citizens. He was a pioneer homesteader in Kansas in 1886, when he located in Ness County, and his life had ranged in its scope from residence in a sod house to a seat in the Kansas State Senate. Paul Klein was born at Mascoutah, St. Clair County, Illinois, September 7, 1856, and is a son of Paul and Mary (Leibrock) Klein. His father was born in 1801, in Bavaria, Germany, where he was married, and in 1852, after the birth of three children started with his little family for the United States on a sailing vessel. The journey consumed three months, and during this time a fourth child was born on the ocean to Mr. and Mrs. Klein, who finally made port at New York and went from the metropolis to Mascoutah, Illinois. In St. Clair County, Mr. Klein settled on a farm, and there continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1885, when he was eighty-four years of age. He was a republican in politics, and was a faithful member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, being for many years on the board of directors thereof. Mrs. Klein,...

Biography of Bernhard Warkentin

Bernhard Warkentin was born June 18, 1847, in the Village of Altonan, situate in Southern Russia, just north of the Crimea. His parents belonged to the Mennonites–followers of Menno Simon, a sect originating in Holland, migrating to Prussia, thence to Russia in 1783 when the Turkish government ceded to Russia the Crimea and Empress Catherine h of Russia induced them to colonize her new possession by offering them allotments of land, religious freedom and immunity from military service for 100 years. His father, Bernhard Warkentin, Sr., was born in Southern Russia in 1816. His mother–nee Tiesen–was born the same year in Berlin, Germany. They were the parents of four children, Elizabeth, Bernhard, Gerhard and Helena. Bernhard’s boyhood was spent in his native village, where he received his early education. Later he went to school in a neighboring city, Halbstadt, and thence to Odessa, where he attended a business college. In 1870 and 1871 the Franco-Prussian war gave Russia an opportunity to conclude a new treaty with the Germans and the amnesty assured the Mennonites by Russia was withdrawn. The prospect of infringement of their rights led the Mennonites to look about for a new location and their eyes turned toward America. Bernhard Warkentin, then a young man of twenty-three years, in company with two young men friends, started out to see the new world. They visited the states in the east, north, south and west, giving especial attention to cities where the largest flour mills were located, for his father was a miller and it was in that industry that Bernhard Warkentin had been interested from childhood. When in...

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