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A Legend Of Slaughter At The Seneca Capital

A legend exists of. a fearful fight that, took pace between the Seneca and Wyandot, on their return from Braddock’s defeat, in 1755. They had fought side by side against the English army, but, no sooner had they dispersed toward their homes, than the old unsettled feud between them was renewed. The Seneca took the trail by Beaver, Mingo bottom, and west to Tuscarawas. The Wyandot took the tippler trail, striking the ridge between the heads of the Elk Eye Creek (Muskingum) and the Hioga (Cuyahoga.), where they camped. It was but a day’s journey across the present Stark County, to reach their enemies at the Seneca capital. The warriors there suspected their design, and sent Ogista, an old sachem, who met the Wyandot on the war-path, stealthily approaching the capital. He sent back a runner to give warning of their coming, and, trusting to his age for protection, boldly penetrated into the midst of the enemy, as a peacemaker. The Seneca, upon being apprised of their proximity, sallied out to fight, but were stopped by Ogista, who was returning with an agreement, made by him and the opposing chief, to the effect that each tribe should pick twenty warriors, willing to suffer death by single combat. When all were slain, they were to be covered, hatchet in hand, in one grave, and henceforth neither Seneca or Wyandot ever again were to raise a bloody hand against the other. Forty braves were soon selected, and each twenty being surrounded, the tribal war-dances were danced, and the death lamentations sung, when the way being cleared, the carnage commenced, which ended as night intervened, there being one...

Biographical Sketch of John Rorabaugh

John Rorabaugh was born in Stark County, Ohio, August 19, 1835. He is the son of Henry and Elizabeth Shaffer Rorabaugh, both natives of Pennsylvania. His father’s occupation was that of a farmer, during a long and useful life, and both parents attained the full time allotted to man-the father reaching the age of four score years, and the mother four score and one. The subject of this sketch remained with his parents until he was twenty-one years of age, and then engaged in farming in his native County until he came to Daviess County and purchased the farm in Sheridan township where he now resides. January 8, 1860, Mr. Rorabaugh was married to Miss Sue M. Brown. She is the daughter of Daniel Brown, a native of Stark County, Ohio, where he still resides. Six children have been the result of this union: Anson O., born May 11, 1863; Delia S. and Delos H., twins, born July 14, 1866; Maggie L., born March 5, 1869; George D., born July 1, 1873; Alexine B., born January 1,...

Biography of Fred A. Sowers

A career marked by specially varied activities had been that of this venerable and honored citizen of Wichita. Mr. Sowers is consistently to be designated as one of the veteran members of the Kansas bar, as a pioneer newspaper man of this commonwealth and as one of the oldest citizens of Wichita in point of continuous residence. As a man of affairs his productive sctivities have been always benignant and though he is near the age of four score years he is still found vigorously concerned with business affairs, as one of the representative citizens of Wichita. He served as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war and in all of the relations of life his loyalty and integrity of purpose have been dominating characterlstics. Such are the sterling pioneers to whom special recognition should be given in this publication. Fred A. Sowers was born at Canton, the judicial center of Stark County, Ohio, on the 18th of August, 1839, and his parents were numbered among the honored pioneers of the historic old Buckeye State. He continued his studies in the public schools of his native city until he had completed a high school course. At Canton he thereafter studied law under the preceptorship of the representive firm of Dunbar & McSweeney, and he was well fortified in the science of jurisprudence at the time when he was admitted to the bar of his native state, at Mount Vernon, in 1862. In 1863 Mr. Sowers enlisted for service in the Civil war, under the command of Col. Kirby Smith. He became a member of Company B, Forty-third...

Slave Narrative of David A. Hall

Person Interviewed: David A. Hall Location: Canton, Ohio Place of Birth: Goldsboro, NC Date of Birth: July 25, 1847 Place of Residence: 1225 High Ave., S.W., Canton, Ohio Ohio Guide, Special Ex-Slave Stories August 16, 1937 DAVID A. HALL “I was born at Goldsboro, N.C., July 25, 1847. I never knew who owned my father, but my mother’s master’s name was Lifich Pamer. My mother did not live on the plantation but had a little cabin in town. You see, she worked as a cook in the hotel and her master wanted her to live close to her work. I was born in the cabin in town. “No, I never went to school, but I was taught a little by my master’s daughter, and can read and write a little. As a slave boy I had to work in the military school in Goldsboro. I waited on tables and washed dishes, but my wages went to my master the sane as my mother’s. “I was about fourteen when the war broke out, and remember when the Yankees came through our town. There was a Yankee soldier by the name of Kuhns who took charge of a Government Store. He would sell tobacco and such like to the soldiers. He was the man who told me I was free and then give me a job working in the store. “I had some brothers and sisters but I do not remember them-can’t tell you anything about them. “Our beds were homemade out of poplar lumber and we slept on straw ticks. We had good things to eat and a lot of...

Slave Narrative of William Williams

Interviewer: Chas. McCullough Person Interviewed: William Williams Location: Canton, Ohio Place of Birth: Caswell County, North Carolina Date of Birth: April 14, 1857 Place of ResidenceL 1227 Rex Ave. S.E. Canton, Ohio Ex-Slaves Stark County, District 5 Aug 13, 1937 WILLIAM WILLIAMS, Ex-Slave Interview with William Williams, 1227 Rex Ave. S.E. Canton, O. “I was born a slave in Caswell County, North Carolina, April 14, 1857. My mother’s name was Sarah Hunt and her master’s name was Taz Hunt. I did not know who my father was until after the war. When I was about 11 years old I went to work on a farm for Thomas Williams and he told me he was my father. When I was born he was a slave on the plantation next to Hunt’s place and was owned by John Jefferson. Jefferson sold my father after I was born but I do not know his last master’s name. My father and mother were never married. They just had the permission of the two slave owners to live together and I became the property of my father’s master, John Jefferson until I was sold. After the war my mother joined my father on his little farm and it was then I first learned he was my father. I was sold when I was 3 years old but I don’t remember the name of the man that bought me. After the war my father got 100 acres and a team of mules to farm on shares, the master furnishing the food for the first year and at the end of the second year he had...

Slave Narrative of Susan Bledsoe

Interviewer: Chas. McCullough Person Interviewed: Susan Bledsoe Location: 12th St. S. E., Canton, Ohio Place of Birth: Gilee County TN Date of Birth: August 15, 1845 “I was born on a plantation in Gilee County, near the town of Elkton, in Tennessee, on August 15, 1845. My father’s name was Shedrick Daley and he was owned by Tom Daley and my mother’s name was Rhedia Jenkins and her master’s name was Silas Jenkins. I was owned by my mother’s master but some of my brothers and sisters I had six brothers and six sisters were owned by Tom Daley. I always worked in the fields with the men except when I was called to the house to do work there. ‘Masse’ Jenkins was good and kind to all us slaves and we had good times in the evening after work. We got in groups in front of the cabins and sang and danced to the music of banjoes until the overseer would come along and make us go to bed. No, I don’t remember what the songs were, nothing in particular, I guess, just some we made up and we would sing a line or two over and over again. We were not allowed to work on Sunday but we could go to church if we wanted to. There wasn’t any colored church but we could go to the white folks church if we went with our overseer. His name was Charlie Bull and he was good to all of us. Yes, they had to whip a slave sometimes, but only the bad ones, and they deserved it. No,...

Biography of William A. Myers

One of the well known and highly regarded citizens of Topeka, Kansas, with which state he had been practically continuously identified since 1888, is William A. Myers, who is a leading factor in and a probable candidate of the republican forces in Shawnee County. For twenty-eight years he had been a competent and faithful employe of the State of Kansas, in the state printing department, is a man of property and of personal high standing. William A. Myers was born in 1856, in Saint Joseph County, Indiana, and is a son of Andrew and Ellen (Oliver) Myers, and a grandson of Jacob Myers, the family history extending no farther back than the Pennsylvania Dutch antecedents of the latter. Jacob Myers was born in Pennsylvania and as he married in Stark County, Ohio, it is probable that he went there in early manhood. He continued in Stark County until in early middle age, when he removed to Elkhart County, Indiana, that section then being pioncer land, almost a wilderness. He reared a family of thirteen children to maturity. Andrew Myers, father of William A., was young when his parents settled in Elkhart County and there grew up. He learned the milling business and coutinued in the same line as long as he was active in affairs, earning the respect of all with whom he had business relations because of his industry and personal integrity. Mr. Myers still survives, bearing well the weight of eighty-one years, and makes his home with his daughter, Mrs. Ida Mather, at Westherford, Oklahoma. In 1855 he was married to Ellen Oliver, who was born in...

Biography of John Welker

John Welker, a prominent notary of Billings, has made his home in that town for over ten years, and his career presents an example of industry, perseverance and good management rewarded by substantial results. Like other representative men of the county, he is a native of the Buckeye State, being born in Stark County May 8, 1838. He has inherited his push and energy from his German ancestors. He is a son of John and Mary (Eply) Welker, and grandson of John Welker, who was born in Pennsylvania of old German stock. The father of our subject was also a native of the Keystone State, but at an early day moved to Stark County, Ohio, and thence to Cumberland County, Illinois, about 1842. He is still living near Hazel Dell, but is eighty-four years of age, having been born in February, 1809. The mother of our subject died in the Prairie State in 1855. To this estimable couple were born these children: James, Samuel, Jacob, John, William, Joseph, Elijah, Edward and Mary A. By the father’s second marriage there were two children: Harry and Sarah. Mr. Welker was formerly a Whig, but became a Republican in his political views, and in religion was a United Brethren. By occupation he was a farmer and millwright, and became a man of some means. He had four sons in the Rebellion: William, John, Joseph and Elijah. Joseph was killed in the battle of Perryville, Kentucky; William was wounded at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, but survived, and is now living at Hazel Dell, Illinois; and Elijah is living at Yale, Illinois. John Welker, our...

Biography of William Munks

WILLIAM MUNKS. – Mr. Munks, an excellent portrait of whom is placed in this history, is a veteran of several wars, as well as a pioneer, trapper and scout in the early days of the Pacific coast. He is to-day one of the most widely known men on Puget Sound, being often called “king of the Fidalgo Island” as he was the first white man to locate on its shores. It was then a part of Whatcom County, Washington Territory, but is now included in the boundary of Skagit. Mr. Munk was the first white man that lived within the present confines of the latter county, and was born in Canton, Ohio. At the early age of six years he suffered the loss, by death, of his father. Upon the breaking out of the war with Mexico, he enlisted in the Fifteenth Infantry, United States volunteers, under General (then Colonel) George W. Morgan, with whom he remained until the close of hostilities. The military record of the family is rather bright, his grandfather having served in the war for independence, his father in the war of 1812, and his only brother following the fortunes of Sherman on his march to the sea. In 1849 he left the East to seek his fortune in the far West. After hunting and trapping for a time on the western slope of the Rocky Mountains, he came onto Oregon, and then proceeded to the mines of Northern California, where he followed mining with good success until 1855, during which time he took part in two Indian wars, and had many skirmishes with the...

Biography of Joseph E. Lowery, M. D.

Joseph E. Lowery, M. D. As a competent physician and surgeon Doctor Lowery has been known in Champaign County for a number of years. He began practice over thirty years ago, his early experience in the profession being in the State of Iowa. Doctor Lowery is a native of Stark County, Ohio, where he was born November 13, 1861. His parents, Joseph and Mary (Simmons) Lowery, were natives of Pennsylvania. His father was a farmer and school teacher. In 1869 the family located in McLean County, Illinois, and in 1882 went to Greene County, Iowa, where Joseph Lowery died in 1888 and his wife 1893. They were the parents of eight children: Frances, Wesley W. and Warren W., all deceased; Walter W., a farmer at Oxford, Nebraska; Nancy, wife of William Fleetwood, of Nebraska; Alice, wife of Dr. A. C. Allbright, of Danville, Illinois; Joseph E.; and Minnie Florence, deceased. Doctor Lowery spent most of his early life on his father’s farm in McLean County, Illinois. Besides the advantages of the country schools he attended the high school at Lexington, Illinois, and subsequently took up the study of medicine in the State University of Iowa City. He was graduated M. D. from Drake University at Des Moines in 1885, and the following year he practiced at Waukee and another year at Rippy, Iowa. Returning to Illinois, Doctor Lowery practiced five years in McLean County, and after that was identified with a growing professional business at Foosland in Champaign County. In 1902 he removed to Homer, where he has had a large general practice as a physician and surgeon for...
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