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Arosaguntacook Tribe

Arosaguntacook Indians: A tribe of the Abnaki confederacy, formerly living in Androscoggin County, Maine. Their village, which bore the same name, was on Androscoggin River, probably near Lewiston. The various names used indiscriminately for the tribe and the river may be resolved into the forms Ammoscoggin and Arosaguntacook, which have received different interpretations, all seeming to refer to the presence of fish in the stream . The name seems to have been used only for the part of the river in Androscoggin County between the falls near Jay and those near Lewiston. The present name was obtained by changing the first part of the word to Andros in compliment to Gov. Andros. The Arosaguntacook lived on the edge of the first English settlements in Maine, and consequently suffered much in the various Indian wars, in which they took a prominent part from 1675 until their removal to Canada. Their town was burned by the English in 1690. As the settlements pushed into the interior the Wawenoc, at the mouth of the river, moved up and joined the Arosaguntacook, and at a later period the combined tribes moved still farther up and joined the Rocameca. These movements led to much confusion in the statements of writers, as the united tribes were commonly known by the name of the leading one, the Arosaguntacook or Androscoggin. These tribes, together with the Pigwacket, removed to St. Francis, Canada, soon after the defeat of the Pequawket by Lovewell in 1725. Here the Arosaguntacook were still the principal tribe and their dialect (Abnaki) was adopted by all the inhabitants of the village, who were frequently...

Pennacook Tribe

Pennacook Indians (cognate with Abnaki pěnâ-kuk, or penankuk, ‘at the bottom of the of hill or highland.’ Gerard). A confederacy of Algonquian tribes that occupied the basin of Merrimac river and the adjacent region in New Hampshire, northeast Massachusetts, and the extreme south part of Maine. They had an intermediate position between the southern New England tribes, with whom the English were most directly interested, and the Abnaki and others farther north, who were under French influence. Their alliances were generally with the northern tribes, and later with the French. It has been supposed that they were an offshoot of the southern tribes, as they spoke substantially the same language as the Massachusetts and Rhode Island Indians, and are generally classed with the Mahican. We know the confederacy only as constituted under the influence and control of Passaconaway, who probably brought into it elements from various tribes of the same general stock. The tribes directly composing the confederacy were: Agawam, Wamesit, Nashua, Souhegan, Amoskeag, Pennacook proper, and Winnipesaukee. The first three of these were in Massachusetts, the others in New Hampshire. The Accominta of Maine and the Naumkeag of Essex County, Massachusetts, were merged in larger tribes and disappeared at an early period. Besides these, the following tribes were more or less connected with the confederacy and usually considered a part of it: Wachuset, Coosuc, Squamscot, Winnecowet, Piscataqua, and Newichawanoc. Some writers also include the Ossipee, Sokoki, Pequawket, and Arosaguntacook, but these four tribes had their closest relations with the Abnaki group. The Arosaguntacook were certainly connected with the Abnaki confederacy. Pentucket village also belonged to the Pennacook confederacy,...

Pocomtuc Tribe

Pocomtuc Indians, Deerfield Indians. A tribe formerly living on Deerfield and Connecticut rivers, in Franklin County, Massachusetts. Their principal village, of the same name, was near the present Deerfield, and they were frequently known as Deerfield Indians. They had a fort on Fort Dill in the same vicinity, which was destroyed by the Mohawk after a hard battle in 1666. They were an important tribe, and seem to have ruled overall the other Indians of the Connecticut Valley within the limits of Massachusetts, including those at Agawam, Nonotue, and Squawkeag. They combined with the Narraganset and Tunxis in the attacks on Uncas, the Mohegan chief. All these joined the hostile Indians under King Philip in 1675, and at the close of the war in the following year fled to Scaticook, on the Hudson, where some of them remained until about 1754, when they joined the Indians in the French interest at St Francis,...

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